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I searched Google for and was shown this "snippet" at the top:

Enter image description here

I quickly realized this was one of the lowest-scoring answers on that SO question.

Enter image description here

The accepted answer has 14 upvotes and no downvotes. Why doesn't Google pick either the answer with the highest votes or the accepted answer?

The broader/ancillary question here is: is Google's algorithm for picking SO answers completely developed and controlled by Google, or does Stack Exchange provide an API and thus control the logic for picking the best answer for Google's snippets?

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    Because it determined that it was what people who are searching for that most often want. The scores are pretty meaningless to google
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 16:44
  • "it" (who) "that most often want" (how do they figure that?)
    – rory.ap
    Jan 24 at 16:45
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    "it" being the Google hive mind. "How", roll a few D20's and see what hits.
    – Larnu
    Jan 24 at 16:46
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    magic, ;) though i'd assume instead it's a case of they try various bits of text and use the one that most often results in a click
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 16:46
  • Yeah but you can't click on that answer. Only on the question.
    – rory.ap
    Jan 24 at 16:47
  • Right, but it's about the search result, the page you're goign to, not the elements on the page that differentiate between the source text being a question or answer.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 16:49
  • The page you're going to has half a dozen answers. Why does it pick that ONE answer? You clicked on the link that brought you to the QUESTION, not a particular answer.
    – rory.ap
    Jan 24 at 16:50
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    i don't think that's relevant. google doesn't care that it's a question with a list of answers. To google it's just a page with content.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 16:51
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    Okay then back to my question. Why did it pick that one answer to display? The commenters here are stating that "it's the answer that people most often choose". If it's only a page with content, then how does google pick that one answer as the "snippet"? How does google know "which answer they most often choose". Where does it get that information?
    – rory.ap
    Jan 24 at 16:53
  • that's not relevant for an SO Meta question is it?
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 16:54
  • FWIW i get a very different listing, that focuses more on the question and links to the top answer.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 16:55
  • There are no "links to the top answer". It doesn't link to answers. It links to questions.
    – rory.ap
    Jan 24 at 16:56
  • Mine does, "5 answers Top answer: Use the ParallelLoopState.Break method: Parallel.ForEach(list, (i, state) ..."
    – Kevin B
    Jan 24 at 16:58
  • Dupe on main Meta: Bad information in google snippets
    – Andrew T.
    Jan 24 at 23:16
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    "The commenters here are stating that "it's the answer that people most often choose"" No comment here states that. The most specific thing said was that Google treats it like any other page. Which it does. It doesn't check the page, then understand there are different answers, scan through the answers, and choose the one it most likes. It just checks the text on the page. Most of it is part of posts, so it's highly likely you'd get part of a question or an answer, however, it can also give you something from the HNQ.
    – VLAZ
    Jan 25 at 7:26

2 Answers 2

14

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Although I'll say this - if someone clicking a link on Google only looks at the first thing they see and they just roll with that...then there's really not a whole lot any of us can do about this.

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  • And remember: That anonymous clicker-accepter can probably vote. Jan 24 at 21:27
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Google doesn't share the exact algorithm it uses to select snippets, but it is an automated process and AI can be influenced in many unexpected ways. SO is a popular enough site I would think their algorithm should include checking which answer was deemed the most helpful, but apparently it doesn't. One thing that is known about their algorithm is that it tends to favor smaller snippets. Perhaps the accepted answer was longer so the algorithm didn't like it.

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    Re "tends to favor smaller snippets": Yes, that is also my leading theory why Google Search refuses to return the canonical questions from 2008 and 2009 (too long and too comprehensive), but instead returns low-scored duplicate questions with "try this" (code dump without any explanation) answers from, say, 2015. Jan 25 at 16:53

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