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I've just posted this question. Within minutes, it was closed, no explanation given, with just a link to another question.

I'm not sure this is a good policy.

  1. There's no explanation of why someone thought that link had an answer to my question. How would they know that I have the necessary knowledge to understand whether the link has that knowledge or not? Shouldn't they at least justify why they think the link has some connection to my problem?
  2. I ask for options regarding data structures that could keep some of the search efficiency and with a small RAM footprint. The link only gives me 1, and as if it were the only sensible choice. Seems to me like very poor moderation... Nobody asked for more details on the type of data I'm using, or if we could structure it in a different way... nothing!
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    This isn't a chat room; it's a Q&A site. People aren't supposed to chat with you or give extended explanations. The blue banner gives explicit instructions on what to do if you don't think that the linked question contains the answer to your question.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jan 8 at 10:14
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    There's no need to justify the chosen links. If the person who closed it got it wrong, it's the author's responsibility to clarify the question so that the links no longer apply.
    – Dharman Mod
    Jan 8 at 10:17
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    We can only answer on the basis of what you provide. If you think that details on the type of data or how it's structured are key things to know in order to properly answer the question then provide that information in the question. Jan 8 at 10:18
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    @CodyGray Have you read the content of my question, and the accepted answers (or most of the answers) in the links provided? It seems as if the moderators only read the title of my question, and then looked at the title of other questions. I wonder whether they actually read the content... Jan 8 at 10:22
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    In regards to your knowledge to understand it, it's beyond our control. Nobody here will guide you into understanding what has been written. You need to get a tutor, start a course, or do some self-study.
    – Dharman Mod
    Jan 8 at 10:23
  • (resuming my previous comment) Here's an example in stackoverflow.com/questions/18614982/… The accepted answer uses a numerical indexing, and then states that the user could use a list. This is not possible in my case... The assumptions made to think that it's possible go against the content in my question Jan 8 at 10:23
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    Side note: please don't call people who voted to close your question moderators. They're not moderators.
    – Dharman Mod
    Jan 8 at 10:24
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    Your question is well outside of my subject-matter expertise. I wouldn't know the correct duplicate for a Python question if it coiled up around me and began squeezing so tightly that I couldn't breathe. Therefore, I am not attempting to defend the correctness of the duplicate that was specifically chosen. It's possible that it is wrong. I am only trying to explain the process, and why it works the way it does. If the suggested question doesn't answer yours, then you should explain why (not here, but in your original question), and then it can be re-opened.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jan 8 at 10:28
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    Note that the same people who can close-as-duplicate can also answer. If you think people lack information to accurately close as duplicate, how do you expect them to accurately answer? Jan 8 at 10:29
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    FWIW, the question seems to be a textbook example of asking for recommendations. The requirements are very vague and cover basically nothing but "has keys and values" with an implication that keys are strings; the description even contradicts your comment here ("I thought of an ordered list" vs "states that the user could use a list. This is not possible in my case"). In essence, it's asking people to collect random guesses what might be suitable. The question surely needs editing. Jan 8 at 10:43
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    @MisterMiyagi your first comment - Because I was only made aware of it by the closing of the question. Initially I thought that it was enough... If it isn't, why not close it by asking for more info, instead of stating that it's a duplicate? Jan 8 at 10:46
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    @Anoldmaninthesea. People don't know whether there is more information. If the information as-is fits an answer or a duplicate, that's what you get. Would you expect people to comment akin to "I could answer this right now but I won't; can you add more information that might invalidate my answer?"? Jan 8 at 10:50
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    @Anoldmaninthesea. There is no standard "ordered list in python" as you describe here. Unless the question provides additional context, I don't see how anyone can be expected to read it other than a list containing items in a specific order. Jan 8 at 10:53
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    @Anoldmaninthesea. bisect implements an algorithm that commonly works on ordered lists... Jan 8 at 11:07
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There's no explanation of why someone thought that link had an answer to my question.

The explanation is always the same: because the person or people who voted for that link, believe they understand the underlying problem in your code example, understand the Q&A at the link, and recognize that the problem matches the Q and the solution matches the A.

How would they know that I have the necessary knowledge to understand whether the link has that knowledge or not?

They wouldn't. This is also irrelevant. Since Stack Overflow is not a discussion forum, the purpose of questions is not to help the person who asked out of a jam, but to build a searchable knowledge base.

Repeated questions motivated by the same underlying problem, with the same solution, do not add knowledge to the knowledge base.

When someone finds a question like this with a search engine, we want to direct them to the "canonical" duplicate, where we have focused our effort on providing the highest-quality version of the question and answers. Thus, we close questions as duplicates, which puts a link right there in everyone's face, and prevents users from putting new answers in the wrong place.

When we fail to close questions as duplicates, someone who finds the new question may end up confused because the duplicate question is a) not clear or explicit; b) not focused specifically on the problem; and/or c) not previously subjected to years of random editors stopping by and contributing minor improvements. Thus, the duplicate isn't just taking up space, but can worsen the presentation of the knowledge.

Shouldn't they at least justify why they think the link has some connection to my problem?

This is a nice courtesy in many cases, but not at all required by site policy. Stack Overflow is about the questions, not the users.

We try to tailor the writing in each Q&A to the apparent essential difficulty of the material; that is, we want to give a basic, easily-understood explanation for problems that beginners will commonly encounter, not because a beginner asked (in fact, it will often be better if an expert asks), but because the question will be searched for by beginners.

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