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This question came from the following use case:

  1. I post a question on Stack Overflow
  2. Sometime later (with the question still unanswered), I find the solution to my problem and post an answer myself.
  3. Sometimes, while the posted solution will work for me, I may still be unsure if it follows best practices, is the most efficient, etc. This is especially the case for security-specific questions (e.g., web authentication, data protection,...), for example - just because it works doesn't necessarily mean it is a good solution.

Usually, an answered question won't attract many new readers. Is there is a way to mark my answer, such that readers see that I'm interested in a review?

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    No, there is not
    – Zoe Mod
    Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 12:51
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    when you say review, do you mean a formatting review like we already do, or do you mean a code optimisation review? if the latter, then you could benefit from codereview.stackexchange.com but make sure you read their help pages to make sure your question is a good question Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 12:52
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    @WhatsThePoint More a review in terms of code optimization, best practices. Not so much formatting the answer. Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 12:54
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    Code Review .......? Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 13:57
  • I don't know about others, but I usually visit both unanswered and answered questions in the tags I'm interested in. Sometimes I may skip an answered question after a quick review (if for example the answerer is known for good answers and the answer looks correct and I don't have time/energy to review it throughly) but I may also skip unanswered questions after a quick review if I find them uninteresting... Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 17:42

1 Answer 1

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Sometime later (with the question still unanswered), I find the solution to my problem and post an answer myself.

For self-answered questions, try to make the question as high-quality as possible first. Put serious, conscious effort into making a proper MRE - one that demonstrates the appropriately decontextualized problem, not simply the task that motivated you to ask. Usually this will end up short enough that the code needed for an answer will also be fairly short. The less code there is, the less opportunity for style issues.

Usually, an answered question won't attract many new readers.

I think this is incorrect. Answered questions aren't filtered out of default views, and answering them makes them "active" which puts them at the top of views sorted by activity. Aside from that, the kinds of people who would skip a question simply because it is answered are probably not the ones you want reviewing your answer anyway; they are, overwhelmingly, the crowd that is trying to get in the first answer on easy questions for a quick +25 from the OP (regardless if the question or answer are beneficial to the site).

Answers are constantly available for review by the entire community, and a significant body of higher-rep users can edit them for you as well if there are writing or style issues. Many more people will feel comfortable leaving a comment suggesting an improvement or indicating where the answer falls short - most notably, the OP, who is most motivated to try the solution in the specific context that prompted the question.

If you seek critique on code that you wrote for an answer because it is code that you wrote and are not confident about (and not out of concern for how well it answers the question), that is why Code Review exists. Be sure to read their rules and guidelines before posting there, just as you would here.

If you really care about getting a high quality answer, consider placing a bounty. However, you might first want to consider the importance of your question. (Have others been upvoting it? Are there comments indicating that people find the question interesting? Are there other attempts to answer it?)

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    "they are, overwhelmingly, the crowd that is trying to get in the first answer on easy questions for a quick +25 from the OP (regardless if the question or answer are beneficial to the site)" Excuse me, it's not that outrageous to focus on unanswered questions -- they are the questions that most need answers!, But even with the wriggle room you give yourself with "overwhelmingly" it is beyond what you can possibly know to be sure that such people only care about quick reputation again. Snide asides distract and detract from an otherwise helpful answer.
    – Nick Cox
    Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 18:57
  • "Excuse me, it's not that outrageous to focus on unanswered questions -- they are the questions that most need answers!" No; in 90+% of cases, they are the questions that most need to be closed as quickly as possible before anyone can attempt to answer them. If I had my druthers, questions would start in a closed stated and have to be approved for opening. Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 19:25
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    I wasn't clear enough if you gathered that I think that all questions deserve answers. If you look closely, you will find that in my own way I am vigorous in downvoting and/or voting to close poor questions and in explaining why questions are weak or inappropriate. I maintain that people's motives can and do vary and that speculation on why people act as they do is at best irrelevant and at worst offensive, unless they say so themselves.
    – Nick Cox
    Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 20:54

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