95

Do we need to consider, however remote, the possibility that the sites will be unfeasible to moderate in the near future unless we transition to a stricter trust model? ChatGPT is banned, but can we actually deal with this new type of generated content? Since it's statistically close to "real" content it means several indicators of low effort are no longer usable on such content:

  • Trivially incorrect spelling, grammar, and structure are usually absent.
  • Drive-by, single-sentence answers can trivially be padded into technobabble so dense that it would take a long time to discern the actual point.
  • Any objections to the Q/A can be response-bombed to the point where the humans in the conversation just can't be bothered.

Basically, writing and moderation both used to be O(N). If writing ends up being O(1) or perhaps O(log(N)), moderation can't keep up with even a small number of unconscientious users.

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    The sad truth is that moderation didn't keep up even before this. The mod flag queue has been swamped with plagiarism flags, for example. There have been other abuses of the system that are hard to root out like voting fraud. That's on top of just content moderation - there is plenty of terrible answers on the site. And a big influx of questions of which a large portion shouldn't have been asked. The close review queue has some 3k items in it. A lot of CVs simply get ejected from the queue and age out because we can't handle all of this. First questions is at 8k items right now.
    – VLAZ
    Dec 5, 2022 at 10:25
  • 21
    "Do we need to consider, however remote, the possibility that the sites will be unfeasible to moderate in the near future" - IMO... the site already is and has been for years. Doesn't stop it from chugging along anyway even though the garbage pile is growing. We're just going to have to suffer through more "why was I banned" and "Stack Overflow is toxic!" meta posts as the pile grows and people keep being automatically banned for contributing to it blissfully ignorant of what they should post on Stack Overflow and what they should post literally anywhere else on the web.
    – Gimby
    Dec 5, 2022 at 10:30
  • 27
    In that chain... we need what we've always needed; more people doing moderation, better tools to assist people doing moderation, and automation in whatever areas can be automated to reduce the amount of people required for doing moderation. Sadly, the company is allergic to both the latter options (though mainly the automation one, tooling is allegedly being worked on, just really slowly). The former is not really in their control, and it's really hard to produce that interest in the first place Dec 5, 2022 at 10:36
  • 1
    Hopefully some of stuff proposed here, if implemented, will help the moderators, as trusted™ community members will be more empowered to help them for some tasks.
    – Larnu
    Dec 5, 2022 at 10:56
  • 6
    @Larnu I suspect they're going to implement something, but we'll have to wait and see if they actually implement roles of value to moderation. But again, "just really slowly" -- SE isn't known for their rapid response times to problems in need of a technical solution. We might be looking at anywhere from 3-4 months to a full year (and based on their history, probably siding on the longer side) before it's fully rolled out. More if you count the obligatory dev-on-prod phase Dec 5, 2022 at 10:59
  • 9
    That's a pretty big ‘as long as’, and it is pretty much already not true. Dec 5, 2022 at 13:03
  • 25
    @Trilarion we already failed on that front. There are plenty of answers that are incorrect or harmful. And they receive upvotes just because they look nice. It's very hard to deal with a post that has multiple upvotes. You need n+1 users to downvote it. And that just systematically doesn't happen. A wrong answer can have dozens of upvotes and the tendency to attract more. A couple of downvotes make zero impact. That's just wrong ones. Plenty of answers are simply not needed because they are the fifth repetition of a solution on a question from 10 years ago. Also hard to deal with.
    – VLAZ
    Dec 5, 2022 at 14:47
  • 11
    All that also is without mentioning the bazillion dupes we get all the time. And that get answered all the time. Which dilutes or outright destroys the value of these questions. Because there is no way to produce a canonical without MAJOR effort. Which is constantly being undermined anyway.
    – VLAZ
    Dec 5, 2022 at 14:49
  • 2
    @camille the concern is that if you write a comment to explain what is wrong with a question or answer and request improvement, an AI could be configured (maliciously) to respond by spamming the comments with equally nonsensical (but surface-level valid) text pretending to justify the question/answer. This would waste the time of moderators and curators trying to verify whether the complaint is legitimate. Dec 5, 2022 at 15:26
  • 2
    "The close review queue has some 3k items in it." I feel like pointing out that this is less than half a day's worth of questions - which is very close to "half a day's worth of questions that ought to be closed". Dec 5, 2022 at 15:28
  • 7
    @VLAZ The custom flag queue is backed-up because we've got a couple thousand plagiarism flags, many of which take a long time to handle. The reason for the existence of those flags is that rampant plagiarism is a problem which just hasn't been effectively dealt with on the site, basically since its inception. So, those flags represent fairly close to a decade and a half of curation-debt. If plagiarism had been more actively handled over that time, we wouldn't have anywhere close to the size of issue we have now and the total volume would be much lower (caught early, it's prevented).
    – Makyen Mod
    Dec 5, 2022 at 15:31
  • 9
    @ZoestandswithUkraine Both the Staging Ground (my team) and Mod Tooling teams are under the Public Platform umbrella. We've grown from one single public platform team into 3 separate sub-teams focusing on different areas of the platform. Staging Ground Beta is launching this week, which I'm really looking forward to. It has taken a bit longer than initially planned, but trust that we've been working diligently on it.
    – Tyler McEntee StaffMod
    Dec 5, 2022 at 20:45
  • 8
    @user4581301 The problem is that a confidently asserted, well formatted, and highly articulate useless answer often still gets a lot of votes. I've had this problem more times than I care to count, where I've asked a thing, someone asserts something irrelevant confidently, I downvote and explain, the answerer doesn't fix anything, and they get several upvotes. And, of course, since a question with an existing answer gets much less attention, the chance of a useful answer all but disappeared.
    – l0b0
    Dec 7, 2022 at 0:01
  • 5
    Sadly, my typical response to problems like this is frowned on by society in general. But seriously, people need to start exercising their right to downvote. We shouldn't have to nag moderators to remove crap because that's not moderating. Maybe a Stack Overflow Bot Post Review chatroom is in order. Dec 7, 2022 at 0:11
  • 7
    What good would a captcha do when real users are the ones posting the generated garbage for self gain?
    – Kevin B
    Dec 7, 2022 at 20:45

3 Answers 3

78

As others have noted (mostly in comments...), none of these problems are exactly new. In particular, floods of superficially plausible answers with reasonable grammar have cropped up repeatedly for ages: even without advanced generators, folks have managed to make a go of this with various combinations of more traditional generators and good old-fashioned plagiarism.

Many have flown under the radar for months or even years. Papers have been written about it.

I say this not to brush off your concerns, but rather to emphasize that these are real, persistent problems and they're only going to get worse. Just as these GPT generators have made the existing issues with SEO spam a bigger issue for folks using search engines, so will they intensify existing issues with worthless and misleading answers here.

Answers must be tested, by folks qualified to evaluate the results and report back. Failing that, they will always be a minefield for the unwary reader, and an annoyance for even the savvy.

So vote, comment, delete... And when that is insufficient, we will continue to see this site decline in utility, just as those before it did in the face of other forms of this problem.

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    Since this is mostly about answers, it is also relevant that something that barely qualifies as an answer can be posted by a 1-rep user, but cannot be deleted by review queues and requires downvotes (that cost rep for the voting users) and multiple delete votes from users with over 10K rep to be deleted. Answers can't get closed for being a "try this: thing the OP said he tried" or being barely comprehensible and don't roomba. It takes a lot more work to delete an answer than to post one. Existing efforts mainly focus on questions, and that's a way easier problem.
    – Erik A
    Dec 5, 2022 at 20:30
  • 24
    The downvote cost issue is almost entirely psychological, @erik - which is still an issue, but one we could and should solve instead of continuing to ignore. I proposed two approaches four years ago but SO, Inc didn't do jack with them because they were still terrified that folks would think downvotes were mean and stop using SO instead of stopping using the site because it was clogged with nonsense. I do hope they wise up before the latter is irreversible.
    – Shog9
    Dec 5, 2022 at 21:04
  • 3
    @Shog9 my voting stats suggest that I voted down at least 38,000 answers (more likely, twice as much). Are you sure that downvote cost is entirely psychological in my case
    – gnat
    Dec 6, 2022 at 14:06
  • 9
    Whatever psychology is applicable in your case, I think it's safe to say it's not an issue here @gnat. You're just maybe a bit of an outlier in this regard though.
    – Shog9
    Dec 6, 2022 at 18:38
  • 4
    Holy <expletive deleted>! That community dude is hard core! Time to up my game. I barely even made the list. Dec 7, 2022 at 0:20
  • 4
    Hey, neat, I'm in the 95th percentile of downvoters on the site.
    – TylerH
    Dec 7, 2022 at 19:02
  • 1
    @gnat that depends on whether or not you care about the cost you've sunk into it. I'd probably be 100k by now if I hadn't had my downvoting record... but what does it matter?
    – Kevin B
    Dec 7, 2022 at 19:12
  • 3
    It's really sad that someone like me, who basically only ever uses this site nowadays to post on Meta, is in that top 250 downvoters list. Really goes to show just how few truly conscientious curators there are.
    – Ian Kemp
    Dec 7, 2022 at 21:56
  • 3
    Do we need to most forthcoming about the valid reasons to upvote posts? Right now, users who I refer to as "Upvote Pixies" are upvoting answers that look like good answers and who have quickly answered a new question. It is, IMO, the Upvote Pixies that are a major impediment to curating bad content -- I cannot cast delete votes on posts which are upvoted. Dec 8, 2022 at 3:21
  • 1
    @mickmackusa in addition, upvote pixies will some times try to "negate" a downvote. Which paradoxically means the content was "good" just because it's "bad". Rather than qualitative assessment of the content. And I gather this from actual comments I've seen where users have directly stated they'd upvote posts that have "downvotes without explanation".
    – VLAZ
    Dec 8, 2022 at 10:49
  • So maybe upvotes should have the -1 penalty? C'mon. I'm trying to be kinder than my usual, 'Kill them." Dec 8, 2022 at 19:38
43

Someone has to say this,

answer downvotes should be free.

There should be no rep penalty for downvoting the answer (at least when voter has no skin in the game).

This looks like the most basic and natural way to establish trust model, proven to work reasonably well on questions and well integrated into the system (rate limits etc). This is what we miss for answers.

The original reason for keeping rep penalty for answers was to prevent (or more precisely tame) and I believe that this reason still holds. I think that if penalty for downvoting competing answers disappears this will eventually lead to too much abuse. "This is why we can't have nice things."

But thing is, it is not necessary for rep penalty to be applied as indiscriminately as it was originally designed. Back then this way was chosen for being the simplest solution that does the job and (and this is a very VERY big "and") doesn't have too much undesirable side effects.

Things have changed and flood of low quality answers now makes mentioned undesirable side effects too much harmful. And because of that I suggest to change the system to slightly more complicated solution which will better reflect current situation.

Specifically, answer downvotes should be free unless these are cast on competing answers (ie on other answers in the question you answered). Downvoting competing answers should carry same rep penalty as before (or maybe even slightly increased one, I honestly don't care).

This approach will prevent tactical downvoting the same way as originally intended and in the same time allow people more freely rate content in the questions they didn't answer.

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  • 11
    @Rubén to start with, multiple downvoted answers will throttle low quality posters (bot or not) - this is embedded in the system of rate limits. Besides, all the usual quality mechanisms associated with downvotes and negative score will start working at last: option of 20K-deletion votes, roomba etc etc. The last but not the least, people will just start feeling better getting the ability to rate content as they want and there will be less of bitter feelings (I believe this is very important)
    – gnat
    Dec 5, 2022 at 23:58
  • 1
    I don't think that the penalty will stop people from downvote really bad posts, specially knowing that the penalty will be reverted when the post be deleted.
    – Rubén
    Dec 6, 2022 at 0:03
  • 1
    @Rubén there is no knowing that post will be deleted in this case, not for a casual reader / voter unfamiliar with our obscure meta discussions
    – gnat
    Dec 6, 2022 at 0:03
  • 31
    I think it's safe to say the cost does discourage downvoting, and that most folks don't know they get the "price" back upon deletion. Furthermore, I strongly suspect most folks don't see their rep as a privilege to be used in service to the public in this manner. But... I also don't think making them free would significantly change any of this soon; in a generation, maybe.
    – Shog9
    Dec 6, 2022 at 1:10
  • 15
    (fwiw, the "price" of downvotes predates concerns over tactical voting. It was added explicitly to discourage downvoting, very early on - podcast discussion here if you're interested: stackoverflow.fogbugz.com/default.asp?W24213)
    – Shog9
    Dec 6, 2022 at 1:22
  • 5
    @user253751 Have you looked how much gnat downvoted? I would call that kind of loss of rep, from answer downvoting, far from free. It cost them delete vote privileges.
    – gre_gor
    Dec 6, 2022 at 5:20
  • 1
    @user253751 Look at the bottom. You won't see an exact number of answer downvotes, but you can make a guess.
    – gre_gor
    Dec 6, 2022 at 5:40
  • 1
    @Shog9 I omitted this oldest part of the history for simplicity. Tactical voting on answers was major concern when original rep penalty was discarded for questions and as I wrote I believe it still holds. However, over 10 years of free downvotes on questions suggest that this is likely the only concern worth worrying about (besides system complication, but as I mentioned flood of low quality answers led us to the point when it looks OK to complicate system a bit)...
    – gnat
    Dec 6, 2022 at 7:19
  • 2
    ...you made a good point that it may take some time for this change to start making a substantial impact. Guess we need some patience waiting for this to happen... although active and experienced voters who already know how it works on questions may make this waiting time shorter that we expect. The sooner we make this change the sooner it will start solving the problem
    – gnat
    Dec 6, 2022 at 7:19
  • 3
    Well now that the AI exists... yes please. Whatever the doctrine was, it has to change. So we need to be open to change.
    – Gimby
    Dec 6, 2022 at 12:55
  • 14
    I avoid downvoting answers because of the rep penalty and didn't know that the rep was returned if an answer was deleted. If the penalty wasn't there, I'd downvote a lot more answers (as I currently do questions, which have no penalty).
    – TarHalda
    Dec 6, 2022 at 15:20
  • 4
    involving active tag regulars in moderation would be natural (maybe even necessary) complement to above. Piles of unmoderated low quality questions hanging around make wide open door for hundreds... thousands bot generated low quality answers - so that even free downvoting won't suffice to handle that. System should change to help tag regulars moderate in their tags without bothering them with stuff "outside". This can spread moderation load from O(N) to O(log(N))
    – gnat
    Dec 7, 2022 at 9:39
  • 15
    Related: downvotes should weigh just as heavily as upvotes. Each should give -10 +10 respectively and not -2 +10 as the system works currently. As a bonus, this would also block the worst rep chasers from endlessly answering the same beginner FAQ over and over instead of closing them as duplicates.
    – Lundin
    Dec 7, 2022 at 15:37
  • 1
    My position is that downvoting should ONLY be free if the downvote is accompanied by a comment, an upvoted comment, or a flag. This makes the action "constructive"/"progressive". If the flag is declined, then the downvote would then incur the original -1 rep penalty. If the all comments and upvoted comments associated with the downvoter are removed, then the -1 rep penalty is applied. Otherwise, the relevant comment or helpful flag validates the downvote. This solves multiple painpoints that users experience in the Stack Exchange Network. Dec 8, 2022 at 3:18
  • 1
    @Lundin Now that you mentioned it, it is well known in game theory that people in a community will willingly pay a price to punish free-riders, and said punishment effectively curbs free-riding. I think if downvotes are on par or perhaps even harsher than upvotes, people would downvote regardless of the rep penalty.
    – Passer By
    Dec 8, 2022 at 6:53
37

Shog probably put it more eloquently than I did, but I'll take a more blunt rationale to this.

Everything you've said to this point has been going on for more than ten years. Suddenly we throw Skynet into the mix, and now is the time for us to have a come-to-Jesus reckoning about the quality of Q&A on the site??

Something specific that I take umbrage to:

Basically, writing and moderation both used to be O(N). If writing ends up being O(1) or perhaps O(log(N)), moderation can't keep up with even a small number of unconscientious users.

...this is just patently false. Moderation has been sorely lagging behind users for a lot of factors.

The biggest one is that there are a lot of questions that get re-asked. This is what closing as a duplicate is meant to address, but even that can get contentious.

Then you have the philosophical perspective of downvoting a question. Believe it or not, there are a lot of people who view downvoting as an attack on a person, and choose not to downvote for that reason. This means that our ability to rank content is sorely lacking for the simple reason that users just choose not to participate.

Don't even get me started on the audit queues. By and large people would last long enough to get the badge and then halt participation. But even if that weren't the case, the sheer scale of reviews that even a small handful of users do could be thrown into question if they're not doing a very good job of reviewing in the first place (e.g. getting tripped up by audits).

So, do we have a moderation problem? Yes, but it's nothing new. Does AI enhance the problem? No, it really doesn't, but it does bring it to light, so perhaps it's best to not waste a perfectly good crisis and get the company to see that what curators have been asking for help with for years really needs to get addressed.

6
  • 4
    Good answer. Heh... I almost lead mine with, "we should consider the possibility that moderation is infeasible now", but that seemed a bit mean; still, I wrote about this problem at length almost nine years ago, comparing it at the time to the difficulties in maintaining a stable orbit - forget solving it, mitigation consumes vast amounts of energy on an ongoing basis.
    – Shog9
    Dec 5, 2022 at 18:46
  • 21
    Your final paragraph assumes that SE Inc. will see AI-generated content as a problem. But SE Inc. has already demonstrated they don't care about the quality of content posted here, only that said content is posted, so why would they care if more low-quality content is posted? At the end of the day, regardless of who or (as in this case) what is posting that content, the pointless metrics for "growth" continue to increase - and that's all their shareholders care about.
    – Ian Kemp
    Dec 5, 2022 at 20:18
  • 2
    @IanKemp I think they'll recognize that if all the good content is completely overwhelmed by garbage (yes one can already say we're overwhelmed, but these AI models open the flood gates to make it way worse), then the site will cease to attract real people, and thus its value for advertising drops significantly and there goes their profits.
    – mason
    Dec 6, 2022 at 1:12
  • 6
    @mason "then the site will cease to attract real people" - don't think so. Before the AI real people were already perfectly capable of flooding the knowledge base with not-so-useful material. From a curation standpoint quality is priority. But from a consumption perspective? Nah. The world of software is littered with permanent temporary solutions.
    – Gimby
    Dec 6, 2022 at 12:53
  • 5
    @mason You're ascribing the ability for rational thought to a company that has repeatedly demonstrated it lacks that capability. Let me know how that works out for you.
    – Ian Kemp
    Dec 6, 2022 at 16:32
  • 5
    Exactly this. The diamond mods have my respect and sympathy as always, but I can't help but chuckle. These chickens are coming home to roost in a coop that SE has built board by board over years of refusing to recognize the volume problem or to provide sufficiently powerful tools for invested site members to help maintain answer quality.
    – jscs
    Dec 7, 2022 at 1:43

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