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Moderator Note: This post has been locked to prevent comments because people have been using them for protracted debate and discussion (we've deleted over 300 comments on this post alone, not even including its answers).

The comment lock is not meant to suppress discussion or prevent users from expressing their opinions. You are (as always) encouraged to vote on this post to express your agreement/disagreement. If you want to discuss this policy further, or suggest other related changes, please Ask a New Question and use the tag.

All use of generative AI (e.g., ChatGPT1 and other LLMs) is banned when posting content on Stack Overflow.

This includes "asking" the question to an AI generator then copy-pasting its output as well as using an AI generator to "reword" your answers.

Please see the Help Center article: What is this site’s policy on content generated by generative artificial intelligence tools?

Overall, because the average rate of getting correct answers from ChatGPT and other generative AI technologies is too low, the posting of content created by ChatGPT and other generative AI technologies is substantially harmful to the site and to users who are asking questions and looking for correct answers.

The primary problem is that while the answers which ChatGPT and other generative AI technologies produce have a high rate of being incorrect, they typically look like the answers might be good and the answers are very easy to produce. There are also many people trying out ChatGPT and other generative AI technologies to create answers, without the expertise or willingness to verify that the answer is correct prior to posting. Because such answers are so easy to produce, a large number of people are posting a lot of answers. The volume of these answers (thousands) and the fact that the answers often require a detailed read by someone with significant subject matter expertise in order to determine that the answer is actually bad has effectively swamped our volunteer-based quality curation infrastructure.

As such, we need to reduce the volume of these posts and we need to be able to deal with the ones which are posted quickly, which means dealing with users, rather than individual posts.

So, the use of ChatGPT or other generative AI technologies to create posts or other content here on Stack Overflow is not permitted. If a user is believed to have used ChatGPT or other generative AI technologies after the posting of this policy, sanctions will be imposed to prevent them from continuing to post such content, even if the posts would otherwise be acceptable.

NOTE: While the above text focuses on answers, because that's where we're experiencing the largest volume of such content, the ban applies to all content on Stack Overflow, except each user's profile content (e.g., your "About me" text).


Historical context of this ban originally being "temporary"

When this ban was originally posted on 2022-12-05, it was explicitly stated as a "Temporary policy". It was specifically "temporary", because it was, at that time, a policy which was being imposed by the subset of moderators who were present on the site over the weekend after the announcement of ChatGPT's public release, 2022-11-30, through the Monday, 2022-12-05, when this question was posted. The moderators involved strongly felt that we didn't have the right to impose a permanent policy in this manner upon the site, but did have a responsibility to impose a temporary policy that was necessary in order for the site to remain functioning while discussion was had, consensus reached, and also allowed Stack Overflow, the company, time to have internal discussions to see what policies they would adopt network wide. So, after consultation with the company, the moderators present at that time chose to implement this as a "temporary" policy.

Since then, quite a lot has happened. Based on the voting for this question, it's clear that there's an overwhelming consensus for this policy. The company has chosen that the specific policy on AI-generated content will be up to individual sites (list of per-site policies), but that even on sites which permit AI-generated content, such AI-generated content is considered "not your own work" and must follow the referencing requirements. The requirement for following the referencing requirements was, later, put into the Code of Conduct: Inauthentic usage policy. There's a lot more that's gone on with respect to AI-generated content. So much has happened such that it's not reasonable to try to summarize all of it here.


1. ChatGPT is an Artificial Intelligence based chat bot by OpenAI, which was announced on 2022-11-30. Use of ChatGPT is currently available to the public without monetary payment.

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    Comments have been moved to chat; please do not continue the discussion here. Before posting a comment below this one, please review the purposes of comments. Comments that do not request clarification or suggest improvements usually belong as an answer, or in Stack Overflow Chat. Comments continuing discussion may be removed. Commented Feb 26, 2023 at 7:28

68 Answers 68

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I am shocked today to get presented a banner “Learn more about AI on Stack Overflow”.

I very much hope and expect the ban on using ML/LLM (so-called “AI”) on writing on SO/SE will continue.

Do we have any updates on that?

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    We should soon, for better or worse
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:15
  • 1
    I got "New! OverflowAI: Where Community & AI Come Together" (linking to Stack Overflow Labs) Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 22:54
  • 1
    If you click the banner, you will learn that it doesn't have much to do with human users posting LLM-generated answers. The timing might not be great, but the ideas they are presenting do have some merit.
    – user8681
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 13:31
  • The terms Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange have become blurred as to their scope. On SE here is one site for starters ... genai.stackexchange.com
    – MT1
    Commented Aug 27, 2023 at 7:17
  • @mirabilos meta.stackexchange.com/questions/79593/…
    – MT1
    Commented Aug 27, 2023 at 7:21
  • @user10186832 totally irrelevant
    – mirabilos
    Commented Aug 27, 2023 at 13:40
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I believe that AI answers should not be allowed on Stack Overflow. Stack Overflow is a repository of user experience and knowledge. ChatGPT uses such data to train but it does not create new knowledge. Beyond the fact that ChatGPT produces many errors and presents them as correct, it can bring no new information or experience to bear to create an answer.

I believe it has some value in the correct context, but not in the context of Stack Overflow. If a person wants an AI answer experience they can use the AI directly; there isn't any need to use Stack Overflow as a proxy.

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    I’m not so sure that it can’t bring new knowledge in the context of SO, or even generally. Such an AI is trained on much larger data set than just SO, and it can at least combine existing information to adjust it to new context (both inter- and extrapolation cover more than the training set). Both of these could add to SO - at least in principle if the output were factually reliable. Commented Feb 22, 2023 at 6:00
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    My point is that all of the knowledge is created by people. ChatGPT doesn't create knowledge. SO and ChatGPT are two different ways of accessing that knowledge. They each have a distinct place; we should NOT homogenize them. What we need is knowledgeable people to contribute to SO; turning SO into a static repository of AI answers will discourage that.
    – Ezward
    Commented Feb 22, 2023 at 18:33
  • This sounded like a ChatGPT answer!!!
    – sudo soul
    Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 0:31
  • It's quite simple: If you want ChatGPT, you know where to find it. Commented Sep 28, 2023 at 17:49
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LLM generated answers should always be banned and the reason has nothing to do with whether LLM answers are low or high quality. It beggars belief that some people think LLM answers are worth posting here when every person and their dog can generate literally hundreds of them with minimal effort. I come to Stack Overflow because I am after a human answer. If I wanted an LLM answer, I could have just entered my question into an LLM myself!

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    If LLM answers were of a quality indistinguishable from human answers, they'd be fine. But they're not, and that is why they're not allowed. Quality has everything to do with this.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 28 at 9:23
  • 4
    @Cerbrus If LLMs could reliably produce the exact same content as human answerers in every single case, we wouldn't need Stack Overflow at all - you could just consult ChatGPT yourself in every case and get the answers much faster. However, given that LLMs are just synthesizing existing human content, their capacity to generate novel content and new information will necessarily lag behind humans - if no human has written something related to that, they would have no way to know about it. I think that there will always be advantages to human answers, so I agree with the basic point here. Commented Mar 28 at 14:59
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    Well, sure, that as well, but the flood of low quality content is what initially triggered this ban.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 28 at 15:38
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What if we fend off AI-generated content with AI-assisted moderation?

The video sharing service I use the most often in China - BiliBili, has an AI-based moderation bot called Avalon, and it monitors for harmful content, makes automatic decisions when harm score is high, and defers to human moderators when it's lacking confidence. It's constantly improving itself based on the evolution of contents and input from human moderators. (Of course, being in China, we also use it for censorship in addition to day-to-day moderation).

This is just my personal opinion, but I think investing in an AI-assisted moderation system is worth it in the long term.

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    The current situation with moderation bots on Quora (with unspecified IQ) is a complete disaster. Though detection of text as images could be a useful addition here. Commented Dec 8, 2022 at 22:57
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    There was the unfriendly comments detector robot where they used AI-assisted moderation already with moderators being the final decision makers but an AI model was used for automated flagging. The same could probably be done for a "really bad answer" category. However, it's kind of sad to see that this basically results in a technology battle between spammers and cleaners, instead of humans learning how to improve their skills. Commented Dec 9, 2022 at 9:35
  • 4
    This isn't up to SO moderation but rather up to the company behind SO. Good luck convincing them. Commented Dec 10, 2022 at 21:15
  • I like the idea of AI-assisted moderation. Humans still making the final decisions, but automation providing tools to make their job easier/quicker. Still, banning people from posting ChatGPT answers as their own answers seems like an obvious no-brainer to me...
    – mdmay74
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 4:01
  • 2
    I don't know. I've been flagged on MSN.com numerous times for stating various things such as: political views; religious views; and, I believe sometimes just simply stating facts. The problem is the algorithm on MSN.com has a notable liberal bias and Microsoft doesn't seem to have any intention of correcting that. This actually goes against Microsoft's core principles of: inclusiveness, fairness, transparency and in some cases even safety...
    – Shawn Eary
    Commented Feb 28, 2023 at 20:40
  • This is a contradiction. You want to ban AI with the very same technology that you are banning? This sounds like the old computer science problem of a program that debugs itself - not possible.
    – Catriel
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 16:02
  • What if INDEED - stackoverflow.co/teams/ai
    – bmike
    Commented Jan 9 at 14:26
  • 2
    @bmike OverflowAI is not "AI-assisted moderation"
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jan 9 at 14:29
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I agree with the ban. Stack Overflow is for questions that the author researched and tried to find an answer for and is still stumped. Questions that require a decent level of expertise to answer appropriately.

If an answerer can paste the question into ChatGPT and get an answer, so can the asker. If a question could have been answered correctly by ChatGPT, then probably the question was poorly researched anyway.

But high quality questions deserve high quality answers. A good asker would have already put their question through ChatGPT and not have gotten a satisfactory answer, and are asking on Stack Overflow for a human expert written answer.

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The spirit of Stack Overflow is that it's from developers to developers, which is quite more than a question-answer site.

While generative AI can often give right answers, especially for simple-to-medium questions, there is a billion questions on Stack Overflow which are more helpful already than their answers. This spirit needs to be preserved.

And why would someone use an LLM to automate answering? I don't see any other reason, except abuse of the rating system. Abuse should be banned.

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    There are 23,975,364 questions on Stack Overflow. Commented Nov 1, 2023 at 15:38
  • 1
    In what way are questions more helpful than answers? Commented Nov 1, 2023 at 15:38
  • 4
    @PeterMortensen there are plenty of questions which show almost working solution to a problem, but require a tweak, which an author won't know. It's a well-known phenomenon of SO that sometimes questions are more helpful than answers. Another way how questions can be helpful is getting to know things you never imagined exist or are a problem, just by scrolling through them. And of course, figuratively speaking, there is a billion helpful questions, sorry for confusion, won't edit.
    – TEH EMPRAH
    Commented Nov 1, 2023 at 21:31
-4

I've given a lot of time before writing this because I think at this point we all have been able to digest and rationalize what is happening around this phenomena.

First of all, I fully agree with the temporary policy, and I am in favor that it becomes a "permanent temporary" one.

The main reason I'm on that opinion is not the fact of the tool being available, but the way so many people were using it: as a copy-pastable BS generator for social networking engagement (in our case, SO reputation). This alone spawns several reasons for why it should be banned, but I don't have to point them out anymore, as it should be common knowledge right now.

I am not in favour of computer-aided code writing as a tool to show examples of how a particular question can be solved. That is a job for GitHub Copilot or other places, not for this website. People can go straight to GPT-3's playground and ask the program to write code for them as an additional reference, but Stack Overflow should remain as human-aided different points of view in a given problem in the form of a question.


On the other hand:

I would like to add to the debate "legitimate" use of the technology. Consider some people who are savvy on the topic of the community (in our case, programming), but they are not proficient in the use of English or in a general sense, for whatever reason, haven't developed very good communication abilities.

Would you consider the potential contributions of such a person less valuable than another one who can express themselves "better" (in the sense of getting their point across close to the most optimal possible way)?

Now take the conclusion you've reached by reading the last two paragraphs and let's see what professionals of the marketing area are doing. They're using ChatGPT as a tool for computer-aided writing. Sure, the lazy ones are just copying and pasting whatever the program spits out, but in the hands of a capable professional, ChatGPT is much more powerful and is faster than hours of googling, which is what they were doing until now.

Also, that is what we programmers were doing until now. Of course, our main sources of inspiration are probably Stack Overflow, but there's a lot of forums around. Just like Server Fault users rely mostly on Server Fault, but the ArchWiki is still a reliable curated source of information, among other wikis and forums. But we all became dependent on search engines like Google Search.

Come to think about it, it came as no particular surprise to me that Microsoft decided to integrate ChatGPT into the Bing search engine.

There is a specific ELI5 prompt on the ChatGPT API examples page that try to show how to use the power of synthetic dialectics to further clarify a subject. The job of a communicator is to find the best words in the best order to exchange an idea to a specific target group. And in that field, ChatGPT is not a terrific tool, but it can aid many people as it is right now.


My point is that computer-assisted writing is a beneficial thing. People can use it to write better questions primarily, but also improve their answers' wording. This is specially useful for the handful of people I've described earlier: the ones proficient in programming, but not as much in writing English, or in communicating in general.

The distinction between computer-assisted writing and copy pasting from a BS generator should be obvious.

I could send this whole answer to proof reading humans or ChatGPT and bet excellent feedback from the humans, but reasonable good feedback from the program. It would look less like I'm the author of it, but in both cases, you, the reader, would struggle less to understand what I want to tell you. DISCLAIMER: I did neither. This is 100% my first take on writing the answer, without revision.

Finally, my opinion is that people should somehow feel that it's ok to use computer programs to aid their writing. I'm not sure how the anti GPT policy could be further improved to include this, or if is it even necessary.

I will repeat this paragraph from the beginning, now that the reader has a new perspective:

I am not in favour of computer-aided code writing as a tool to show examples of how a particular question can be solved. That is a job for GitHub Copilot or other places, not for this website. People can go straight to GPT-3's playground and ask the program to write code for them as an additional reference, but Stack Overflow should remain as human-aided different points of view in a given problem in the form of a question.

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    Why use ChatGPT for computer-aided writing? Why not use translators and/or Grammarly and/or other tools that fill this niche? Honestly, the most likely outcomes I can see from using ChatGPT to "aide" writing is a) copy/paste. So pretty much exactly the same as now. But the user can claim "me not good speaker, used ChatGPT to aide". b) ChatGPT fumbles the writing and does not represent the idea the user wanted to put across correctly. There is also a chance that it's OK, however, what are the chances that a user needs tool assist will recognise bad output?
    – VLAZ
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 18:44
  • @VLAZ looks like ChatGPT agrees with you: platform.openai.com/playground/p/… Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 19:12
  • 13
    Code completion isn't a substitute for professional engineering. Using code completion tools doesn't make you an engineer, let alone a good engineer. Code completion tools optimize an expert's workflow, but it's not the workflow unto itself.
    – Makoto
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 19:21
  • 3
    @Makoto I stated two times the exact same paragraph in my original unedited text arguing against code completion on SO Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 19:44
  • 3
    Then you've used a whole lot of words to simply say that you agree with this. There's been plenty of prose on this matter and there's really not a lot of value to keep adding to it unless you're offering a completely unique take on it.
    – Makoto
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 19:49
  • 7
    I'm sympathetic to the concept of using LLM-based tools (not necessarily ChatGPT) to clean up one's writing. But there's a danger that the tool will say something different to what the writer intends, especially if their English skills aren't strong. That could lead to greater misunderstanding. If I see clear confident English I tend to assume the author knows what they're talking about. If the writing has a few flaws I can tell the author is struggling to express themself, so I might not have the correct interpretation, and I may need to post a comment for clarification.
    – PM 2Ring
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 19:50
  • 5
    @PM2Ring fun fact - you can interact with ChatGPT in languages other than English. For example, you can instruct it to translate something in English. However, the training it has had other than English is a bit hit and miss. I have no confidence whatsoever it will be able to correctly pick up the meaning in another language. I've seen it very badly misinterpreting rather simple prompts when not in English.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 19:58
  • 8
    I’m really not a fan for using ChatGPT to translate or significantly brush up technical writing. Since the tool basically makes up stuff, it is absolutely vital that the posting user can verify all of its output; if that output is much more sophisticated or even entirely unintelligible to the posting user, they can’t do that. Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 20:29
  • @Makoto agree with what? Your wording makes me think that you think I'm either agreeing or disagreeing with the anti ChatGPT policy, which is not the point of my answer whatsoever. Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 23:51
  • @PM2Ring that is a fair point, but in this circumstance people are already struggling with tools like Google Translate and getting worse results. If they include the customary disclaimer that they're not proficient in English and they're being aided by online tools, they'll be fine as always Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 23:53
  • @VLAZ I happen to use ChatGPT exclusively on Brazilian Portuguese and I though that was the same output I'd get from English. Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 23:55
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    Even during translation or editing, ChatGPT is prone to introducing falsehoods or misstating facts to the level that they become incorrect. Often this creates the appearance of lying from the author, when the intent was simply to address any grammar or spelling issues. The tool really causes more harm than good, and that is why it is banned.
    – Travis J
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 23:55
-6

LLMs are trained on data from sites like SO. What do you think is going to happen when they're going to train LLMs on content created by LLM? That can only create a self-reinforcing loop of generating incorrect nonsense and therefore completely damaging the usefulness of both SO and LLM itself.

LLMs do not really understand the topic. They only understand relations between words. They don't really have insight in the subjects described by the text. If we're going to post LLM-generated content here on SO, over years it will lead to the latest more advanced LLMs being trained on data produced by early simple LLMs (potentially without being verified by someone with actual insight).

Some might argue it's possible to prevent this using voting for/against the posts. But how can you be sure the LLMs are not voting as well? Also casting a vote does not require the voter to explain why he/she votes the way he/she does, nor to prove his/her insight.

For this reason, I think the policy to ban AI-generated content is correct.

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    This doesn't in any way answer the policy, or comment on it...
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Apr 3 at 12:59
  • 5
    "But how can you be sure the LLMs are not voting as well?" That's not a feature LLMs have... Language models generate text. They don't interact with websites.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Apr 3 at 13:02
  • "Language models generate text. They don't interact with websites." oh really? how does the LLM generated content gets posted then? obviously someone needs to copypaste or write script to do that. based on LLM output. I think this is beyond scope of my argument. you can present LLM with post from SO, let it decide and then vote on its behalf. obviously.
    – Harvie.CZ
    Commented Apr 3 at 13:02
  • 8
    That's... Wat... Look, if a user decides to copy a post into a LLM and vote on that post according to what the LLM says the user should do, then that user is free to do so. That's not the LLM voting, that's just the user using a convoluted process. If someone were to automate that, they'd get banned very quickly, as you're not allowed to automate voting. None of that has anything to do with an LLM ban.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Apr 3 at 13:12
  • 5
    Today's ChatGPT fail ("principal" is the exact same as, well, "principal") Commented Apr 4 at 0:38
-7

It's 2024. I visited 3 pages of answers. None contains the buzzword "copyright".

I'm just trying to contribute in the first message of this thread, to try to add a mention that this is not "just" a community policy about being precise or not; the ban reasons should also stress more about being a needed moral and legal proactive measure, to avoid additional plagiarisms and copyright infringements.


LLMs causes extra Copyright and Credit Nightmares

Popular large language models are like Pandora's pots, trained over millions and millions of obscure copyrighted materials, and this can surely cause extra potential copyright violations and plagiarism that can be tricky to be proactively identified, to assure long life to the Stack Exchange network, distant from boring extra lawsuits and extra mass "content takedown" requests.

Because LLMs Do Not Give Authorship Credits

Even taking copyright apart; popular LLMs do not mention the author, so they do not respect moral rights, and they do not fulfill our sane referencing standards.

https://meta.stackexchange.com/help/referencing

...for Technical Reasons

No known popular large language model was currently designed to give you the original sources. A "generic human" can tell you who taught to sum 1 plus 1: they can find their early Math school book and find out which page of that book says so. LLMs, instead, are trained differently, and cannot just give references in the expected way.

Some advanced LLMs acts like are able to give you references, but if you pay attention, even these are "just" capable to share "further information", and only after whatever text is generated (e.g. Microsoft Copilot, ...).

...for Political Reasons

Moreover, popular LLMs usually do not even share the original dataset on their website (and this is a political issue, not a technical issue; as the dataset can be shared in whatever moment, especially from organizations that have "Open" and "AI" in their official name).

Indeed this practice of closing the dataset does not simplify the backward work of finding the right credit to a generated text.

Because we are supposed to release in CC BY-SA 4.0

Premising that, as I hope everyone already noted, in every single page of the Stack Exchange Network, there is this phrase at the footer of the website:

Site design / logo © 2024 Stack Exchange Inc; user contributions licensed under CC BY-SA.

Please take 60 seconds to read this page, if it's your first time:

https://stackoverflow.com/help/licensing

It just means that new contents must be covered by these terms:

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/

(Again please take additional 60 seconds to read this ↑)

Also note that there is not any "unless otherwise noted" in the above SE copyright terms.

TL;DR

Both the Stack Exchange Inc. and the SE community have probably no sufficient time to fight this additional copyright risk, and moral risks, of giving no sufficient credits to original content authors.

The potentially high benefits do not outweigh the potentially very very very high risks, especially without enforcing an extra care and awareness.

Next Steps?

  1. SE policy lacks an "unless otherwise noted"
    • At the moment the copyright terms of SE does not mention the phrase "unless otherwise noted". That phrase is quite useful, since our planet has billions of contents under thousands of licenses, and very often answers are like "«bla bla bla» very long snippet citation1 citation2 citation3" and indeed this kind of answers are not content under CC BY-SA 4.0, but are instead contents released under the terms of the upstream copyright holder. Usually, official code snippets are pasted here on Stack Overflow as answer but just as mention, to quickly find that upstream documentation. So indeed, with or without AI-generated contents, a global "unless otherwise noted" would probably help in quoting external contents (ChatGPT included I guess...).
  2. Evaluate "fair use" policies
    • If you know what you are doing, small use of proprietary sources can be used even if they are "all rights reserved". But, you must clarify that the content is not yours, and you should clarify the reasons why you believe that the content can be shared in "fair use". Note that the Wikipedia community has interesting "fair use" policies. Instead the community of Wikimedia Commons does not generally include contents in fair use. But clarifying such policy in our website may be necessary, sooner or later, with ad without AI; and with and without AI contents that are assumed under "all rights reserved" as default.
  3. Evaluate big disclaimers about AI-generated contents
    • Basically stuff like https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Template:PD-algorithm that it's currently embedded in some multimedia files, to say that «This file is in the public domain because it is the work of a computer algorithm or artificial intelligence and does not contain sufficient human authorship to support a copyright claim. The United Kingdom and Hong Kong provide a limited term of copyright protection for computer-generated works of 50 years from creation. 1 2».

So, I think the current ban is OK. Before even discussing a re-activation, we should at least afford the above points, to improve the legal safe space for editors but also readers, and use this kind of tools in a legal way.

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    This point is kinda moot, since posting AI-generated content as if you wrote it yourself is more or less plagiarism, any way, regardless of if the content in and of itself is plagiarism.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jun 20 at 23:16
  • (What does "moot" means? urbandictionary does not help me. Thanks @Cerbrus) Commented Jun 20 at 23:50
  • 1
    2nd definition in this context: en.wiktionary.org/wiki/moot_point
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jun 21 at 0:00
  • Ah thanks. I wonder if at least a small little additional stress about potential copyright issues and plagiarism could be added in meta.stackoverflow.com/q/421831/3451846 in a short phrase (avoiding my late wall of text indeed). Also maybe stackoverflow.com/help/referencing - since they seems a bit somewhat related to community standards (variable) and not so much to laws (not easily variable) Commented Jun 21 at 0:39
  • 1
    My point is that the copyright argument is irrelevant, since even if the generated content didn't have any copyright issues, it's still a form of plagiarism, as the user does not write AI-generated text themselves.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jun 21 at 7:21
  • (Premising that, generally, plagiarism is not a copyright infringement, and so a plagiarism does not necessarily causes legal penalties) I'm just trying to contribute in the first message of this thread, to try to add a mention that this is not "just" a community policy about being precise or not; the ban should be shared mainly as a moral and legal proactive measure. Unfortunately, comments in the first thread are blocked and I cannot say that. But that's my small scope: give these two strong reasons to the current ban. Commented Jun 21 at 7:41
  • 2
    The reason for the ban is the low quality of the content, though. SE was being flooded by good-looking nonsense. Whether or not AI-generated content even qualifies as copyright infringement is still up for debate. I mean, I get what you're suggesting here, but I don't think SE needs to "dilute" the reasoning for the ban.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jun 21 at 7:45
  • Dilute? I'm not talking about removing any reason. I'm just trying to add 1 o 2 (still strong) additional reasons. Commented Jun 21 at 7:51
  • 1
    The "moral" issue is a red herring. A huge amount of answers copy information directly from official sources like learn.microsoft.com. That particular site specifically states that user's may not copy content. So given the moral issue isn't enforced for humans, why would it be any more burdensome to not enforce it for LLMs?
    – Ian Newson
    Commented Jun 24 at 11:50
  • @IanNewson premising that quoting somebody is generally allowed by right of citation (fair use, out of copyright) and that mentioning "learn.microsoft.com" is already respecting moral rights, since there is attribution. Instead, LLMs do not generally respect these. "ChatGPT said" indeed is misleading citation, and just potential plagiarism. Commented Jun 25 at 8:23
  • @ValerioBozz I don't understand your point. The copyright holder determines what is allowed, not StackOverflow or contributors here. If the copyright holder determines that attribution is acceptable to meet their terms then that's great. However that's never been enforced on SO so trying to say it's morally wrong if ChatGPT does it but not if a human does is obviously inconsistent.
    – Ian Newson
    Commented Jun 25 at 23:18
  • @IanNewson I agree when you say, copyright holder determines what is acceptable: about ChatGPT, it's all rights reserved, by the way. The thing is, we cannot even use it by some fair uses, since the right of citation in ChatGPT has no sense: it's not a source of information (contrary to any other author, documentation, source of truth, included learn.microsoft.com, following your example). That is why, it would still be useful to better mention in our policies that LLMs are also causes of additional troubles about copyright and moral rights, since they were not designed to respect these. Commented Jun 26 at 8:02
  • 1
    @IanNewson "However that's never been enforced on SO" - if you mean that we don't require attribution of quoted content, that's not true, and we do enforce that. See How to reference material written by others.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Jun 26 at 8:32
  • @ValerioBozz What do you mean by "about ChatGPT, it's all rights reserved"?
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Jun 26 at 8:33
  • @RyanM Premising that the default copyright for general worldwide creative creations is en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_rights_reserved and premising that all footers of their websites have "OpenAI ©" without further indications mentioning the word "copyright" and premising that the material with which they feed their LLM is not theirs (much of which is indeed all rights reserved; and they cannot remove these materials as they clarified in multiple occasions), it is not crazy to assume that our worldwide legal framework is just not ready to adopt that LLM without additional copyright risks.. Commented Jun 26 at 9:36
-11

I see things differently.

1. We all gain from using AI tools

We all know that AI tools are created by developers like us, not only for the end user, but also for the developers. Even an expert prefers an editor with colored code rather than a black-on-white editor.

The world of AI is developing rapidly and we all benefit from finding cases where tools like ChatGPT will be useful for our community and how to use them instead of acting like it's some weird tool that we don't know how it works.

Having tested ChatGPT, I find it to be a very good tool for general knowledge. Like other testers, I found a lot of mistakes in the answers when I ask technical questions, but it is still a great tool that we should use in the community.

2. The ban should be permanent for answers generated from any resource.

I personally use Stack Overflow since I'm a novice and it helps me and helped me a lot especially when I started: it was my first search engine and I think it's not about ChatGPT or other tools, but about developers who copy and paste answers from resources without being able to validate or explain them in context.

ChatGPT just increased the priority of problems we've already had.

While AI is getting more and more accurate, it's not very efficient for us to allow an AI-generated response in a response thread, because our human response (even if incorrect) is an information about how we are thinking (in a computer context) and that's useful data in analysis.

Allowing AI-generated responses will corrupt this data set. Simple example: without AI responses, we are currently able to say "According to Stack Overflow data, developers learn 2 more languages and 5 more frameworks every 5 years". This kind of information is useful and it's just one of thousands of cases. So I think we definitely need to ban AI-generated responses in our current response thread.

It takes time to write a good response and I don't think people who know what they are talking about should want to copy and paste responses from a resource. So I suggest adding some new features to the reply editor:

  • Disable copy and paste as clean text: The developer should write everything in their own words, and even if there is a typo, it is not a problem. We can have tools that clone and correct the written response before publishing the correction.

  • We need to highlight all the pasted data and it should not be editable. A more powerful change would be to manage it as a resource that should have a link and a description of how to find (or generate) that resource.

3. AI should be used in Stack Overflow

As I said, I really think ChatGPT is a good tool and that's why I suggest the community train its own model for a text-based bot that will be more accurate in the computing context and integrated into our search bar. That way we give the developer the choice when searching for something to go through the bot generated answers or explore solutions provided by other developers.

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  • It's not clear to me what your proposal is for using AI in the site (is it only to improve the search functionality?), and it seems way off on a tangent anyway. If your proposal is that the site should run questions through ChatGPT first before offering a submit button, that has already been roundly rejected: it risks a flood of people leaving with broken code that we don't know anything about. Commented Jan 6, 2023 at 23:12
  • "We need to highlight all the pasted data and it should not be editable. A more powerful change would be to manage it as a resource that should have a link and a description of how to find (or generate) that resource." Aside from being absurd, this would be trivially circumvented by anyone who knew about it, by just doing the copying and pasting in a separate program. I am generally against putting arbitrary speed bumps like that into the UI, especially if they are not very explicitly explained. Commented Jan 6, 2023 at 23:14
  • seems kinda odd to expect a language model to be able to link user search queries with accurate search results. Wouldn't any other "AI" built for search indexing serve that purpose better?
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 6, 2023 at 23:15
-15

I feel the ban is good and should be permanent because we have to remember that ChatGPT is really just a more interactive search engine and its results, whilst clever, are still the result of scraping existing web pages - just like any other search engine.

By allowing ChatGPT answers on Stack Overflow (and other sites), we'd be creating an echo chamber whereby the answers it generates are simply based on its previous answers, which may not have been right in the first place.

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    Chat GPT is an AI Chatbot that got trained a while ago with large amounts of data from websites/books etc. It isn't a search engine and it doesn't scrape existing websites. It would probably be more accurate if it just copied code from a website. Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 12:31
  • 6
    @PhobosFerro You comment contradicts itself. If it was trained with data from websites then it's still dependent on the content of websites and will have to be updated to keep relevant. How it actually gets the new data may not be scraping but it will still be reading its own answers. Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 12:52
  • 5
    Do you have first-hand experience using it as an interactive search engine (not a rhetorical question)? Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 22:12
  • 1
    @PeterMortensen the branded "new Bing" does that. What it does is: user makes a search query, Microsoft does a regular Bing search, send parsed results as part o a prompt to OpenAI's GPT4, and finally it answers as an interactive chat search. Commented Mar 13, 2023 at 14:38
-16

Possible Improvement Idea - Improve how we humans upvote answers.

From reading the previous answers to this thread, it seems a lot of the motivation for the bad behavior of posting non-validated answers quickly, regardless of whether they were generated by ChatGPT, is motivated by "point farming". One way that users like us can help "fix" the problem is to not upvote nice and shiny looking answers and comments that we have not validated.

... We should only upvote answers that we have actually validated.

We should not upvote a response that we haven't tested and proved to work just because it looks like they know what they are talking about or just because it sounds good. That means I should first test whether the proposed answer is actually a valid answer and then come back to the answer and upvote it.

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    Specify "validated". How would you enforce this? How would you change hoe people vote?
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Dec 8, 2023 at 11:56
  • 11
    "One way we that users like us can help "fix" the problem is to not upvote answers and comments that look nice and shiny but which we have not validated." The past over a decade of this site existing has shown this is not how users vote. A more interesting looking solution often gets more upvotes than a more thorough or even more correct one. I don't see how you expect the voting for all users to change. Saying "let's do it this way instead" doesn't actually accomplish that.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Dec 8, 2023 at 12:12
  • What do you mean by "One way we that users" (seems incomprehensible)? Commented Dec 9, 2023 at 0:02
  • 5
    Re "first test whether the proposed answer is actually a valid answer and then come back to the answer and upvote it": That would be great. No, really. It didn't happen before ChatGPT (there are likely a lot of undetected completely bogus answers on Stack Overflow posted before December 2022. For instance, the many code dumps without any explanation whatsoever. Say, copied from other completely unrelated answers on Stack Overflow or copied from elsewhere on the Internet (say, from the official documentation)) Commented Dec 9, 2023 at 0:05
  • 5
    I fully agree that is how it ideally should be. Yet I don’t see how it practically could be. Commented Dec 9, 2023 at 6:12
-17

I'm curious how this policy can co-exist with the now public stance that Stack Overflow is going to be training AI models on content here.

I understand a lot of work and thought have gone into this policy as there were significant negative repercussions, but "AI for me, and not for thee" seems a bit too much on the nose to be sustainable.

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    Posting of generated content is still banned. OverflowAI is not in conflict with this, since it's not about posting anything. With that said, it's widely agreed that the company has made poor choices in what projects they pursue.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jan 9 at 14:28
  • 1
    Isn’t it pretty normal that the provider has more privileges than the users? Commented Jan 9 at 14:57
  • @VLAZ I head you, however no one should ignore the implied judgement the company has announced: We will make good use of AI tools. You will not make good use of AI tools. Over the next several quarters we all will see what really happens, but as an observer from another site, I felt the need to speak up when got news in a 2 week period of "put this banner up saying NO AI followed by a featured post COME GET AI".
    – bmike
    Commented Jan 9 at 16:28
  • @bmike again, I'm telling you the company has not been ignored.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jan 9 at 16:37
  • @bmike because user input has never been the problem, right?
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jan 9 at 19:10
  • 6
    @bmike Except that a lot of the people posting AI content weren't making good use of it. Commented Jan 9 at 19:10
-17

Preface

In the past when searching for the answer to some problem with your favorite search engine, you could easily find the same answer many times, even though it was obviously wrong (not working).

That was (I suspect) due to the fact that many users just copied answers from elsewhere without citing where they got it from, or due to "re-framing", that is, some site just placed a new frame and some advertising around another site. Fortunately, the latter have vanished mostly meanwhile.

ChatGPT

I think ChatGPT and alike are impressive, but there are still severe problems: I have a (seemingly simple) programming problem that I couldn’t solve myself reading the documentation, so I used Google to search for solutions. I had tried a few, but none worked, so I tried ChatGPT.

ChatGPT provided a "solution" that looked similar to the ones I had seen before, but actually it didn't work either. So I told it that the solution did not work, and ChatGPT provided me with another "solution" (that also did not work).

I think the above clearly shows the problem with ChatGPT: It cannot tell where it got its wisdom from, and the answers may be incorrect without ChatGPT knowing.

Any use?

Still, I could imagine (monetary and legal issues left aside) that SO integrates ChatGPT for newly asked (or to be asked) questions:

  • It could be used to find similar (equivalent) questions before posting the question. I saw many questions about the same problem (like "find string X in input Y"), where the posters were unable to abstract the problem to the root problem, not even partially.
  • It could suggest an "answer" before posting the question: If ChatGPT could provide a correct answer, there isn't any need to post the question on SO (maybe because the question is rather trivial also).
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  • 12
    You can already sign up to AI search. What's the point in having an AI suggested answer if your experience suggests that it simply doesn't work. Isn't that just a waste of their time? Commented Feb 7 at 11:10
  • There's no guarantee that answers do work, but there also is no guarantee that answers do not work. So the OP could give it a try.
    – U. Windl
    Commented Feb 7 at 11:41
  • 9
    Erm, but you did give it a try and it wasted your time. Commented Feb 7 at 13:02
  • 3
    "you could easily find the same answer many times, even though it was obviously wrong" i mean... if every answer you tried that worked for someone else doesn't work for you, isn't it more likely that means something is different in your environment or your implementation rather than what worked for n other people was also a wrong answer?
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 7 at 15:44
  • 3
    Overflow AI isn't supposed to generate new answers, it's supposed to present existing ones. So if your problem is all existing answers are solving a problem differently than you need them to... having Overflow AI find the answers for you isn't going to be any better than standard search.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 7 at 15:49
  • 2
    The experience you describe is the exact reason ChatGPT answers are not allowed. They are almost always wrong. Essentially if you don’t have the knowledge necessary to validate them which is almost always true for anyone using ChatGPT to submit an answer to a question they cannot author themselves Commented Feb 8 at 14:13
  • @Kevin B No there actually exist nonsense answers that cannot work, but still people copy them. I once (in the times of MS-DOS) I knew someone swearing the command to start Turbo Pascal is exit, because when he had started a shell from Turbos Pascal, exit seemingly started Turbos Pascal from there seemingly. OK, this is an extreme example...
    – U. Windl
    Commented Feb 9 at 6:50
  • I'm not quite sure where you got the impression that i don't think nonsense answers exist. What I'm saying is if every answer you find is nonsense... there's another common denominator there that could be the actual problem.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 9 at 6:52
  • I completely disagree with the last point of this answer: since this generated answer might very well contain absolute nonsense, nothing like this should be shown. Answer without this part, answer is not related to the ban: we already have suggested similar questions (however crappy they are), and changing algorithm of their suggestion is out of the scope here.
    – markalex
    Commented Feb 10 at 8:47
  • ChatGPT works as a highly unreliable, but sometimes useful, advisor. For example, it is good at guessing typos and SIAs (if you don't have the imagination for the guessing game) which otherwise makes something on the Internet incomprehensible. Commented Mar 3 at 0:18
-18

I can totally understand that AI generated answers bring up potential risks in terms of correctness and useful content, since, especially in the universe of developers, answers of AIs are very often not only wrong, but also do not show best practices.

The view changes for me when it comes to the notion of banning AI from "enhancing" posts. Using AIs on comments which are intellectual source of individuals could potentially improve the vocabulary and grammar of many questions and answers on Stack Overflow. So it would in my opinion make more sense to encourage people to prepare questions/answers and assess improvements with AIs, rather than risking negative feedback due to misunderstandings or bad expressions.

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    The ban is a blanket ban because it is not feasible to distinguish generated from "enhanced" content. From that standpoint it simply didn’t matter how good the good case is, as long as the bad case is bad enough. Commented Jan 2 at 15:27
  • 2
    If you have a proposal for how we can tell "enhanced" posts from generated ones, with minimal human labor, then add that your answer, I'm sure the community would be interested to hear it. Until we have such a mechanism, we have to treat both the same. Commented Jan 3 at 0:29
  • Well, I think it is less "a thing" that needs control, but rather more important to raise awareness in how to use such tools. Using AIs can bring also positive impact and is not only a risk factor as long as people are aware about how to use it. I think Stackoverflow, as the worldwide leading platform for the development industry has an obligation to act as a role model since banning in general terms and "marking" AIs as evil is easy (with questionable outcome), but the more courageous approach would be in explaining, how such tools could be integrated into workflows and the community.
    – Emad Easa
    Commented Jan 3 at 0:54
  • 2
    "could potentially improve the vocabulary and grammar" there are already tools out there for this which don't use generative AI... Commented Jan 3 at 6:47
  • 3
    @EmadEasa Feel free to explain or explore that in an appropriate format, perhaps a separate meta-Q&A. This Q&A is about the ban itself and not the appropriate place to raise awareness for what you have in mind. Commented Jan 3 at 9:16
  • Stack Overflow's purpose is to serve as a repository of high quality Q&A. I'm not sure why you think we're obligated to serve as an AI advocate on top of that, especially when doing so would compromise our actual purpose. Commented Jan 4 at 23:10
-19

The more tricky question is: should paraphrases of GPT-whatsit-generated verbiage be banned?

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    Yes, just like with plagiarism, direct paraphrasing of AI generated content isn't permitted. We've detected and appropriately handled a substantial number of posts and users where there was considerable effort made to hide/obfuscate that the post content was AI generated. Is detection of such posts perfect? Of course, not. However, moderators are likely going to be less lenient for a user that has clearly demonstrated, by trying to hide/obfuscate, that they know they are doing something that's against the rules and at the same time caused moderators and users doing curation to spend more time.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Mar 29, 2023 at 17:43
  • 4
    whatsit: "(chiefly UK) A thing (used in a vague way to refer to something whose name one cannot recall, or that one is embarrassed to say)" Commented Mar 29, 2023 at 18:14
-22

In your reasoning for the general ban on "All use of generative AI", you have not explained how it could be "harmful" to the website if a user verifies an AI-generated answer for correctness before posting it (for example by testing the code), or partially uses it in reaching their own correct answer.

In other words, if the problem is the curation and moderation of bad answers, why limit the ways good answers can be generated? With the AI-generated content becoming more accurate every day, (a) even human experts are more likely to provide better and quicker answers if they use AI for assistance, (b) it will be increasingly hard to detect AI use in part or all of an answer, and (c) it will be easier for this platform to actually use AI to find and flag potentially bad/incorrect answers, whether generated by humans or AI, for human experts to review.

Therefore it seems more logical to help the "swamped volunteer-based quality curation infrastructure" by actually using AI to prioritize the reviewed content, and to utilize other hard solutions such as limiting the posting frequency, rather than announcing general bans that could end up being hypocritical and impossible to enforce.

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    There is no logic here to counter. The ban makes it clear it is a blanket ban because AI generated answers look correct no matter if they are. There is no harm assigned to verified answers, and the magical tooling by which you want verified and unverified answers to be separated simply does not exist. Commented Feb 10 at 5:03
  • 11
    Do you understand that LLMs do not and will not understand meaning of the text? And if you do, how you imagine "actually use AI to find and flag potentially bad/incorrect answers"?
    – markalex
    Commented Feb 10 at 8:38
  • @MisterMiyagi, AI generated answers "look correct" and are a lot of times correct. Of course not always, but that's true for human answers too. That's why you verify them! "There is no harm assigned to verified answers," There is a ban placed on them presumably because of a harm assigned to them. And there is no "magical tooling" that claim to exist.
    – FNia
    Commented Feb 14 at 23:41
  • 9
    The problem with "verify them" is that the amount of time, effort, and expertise it takes to verify an answer is often multiple orders of magnitude greater than the 10 seconds the poster spent blindly copy-pasting the question into ChatGPT. It's not sustainable to spend that much more effort removing bad content than it takes to create it, particularly when there are more people creating it than trying to remove it.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Feb 14 at 23:55
  • @markalex Do you understand what it means to "understand", before making any claim about LLMs' understanding? And does it matter if a calculator "understands" numbers, as long it produces correct answers? Depending on the model quality and task at hand, LLMs can be very likely to produce correct and useful outputs (so a blanket ban on them is nonsensical) and they can probabilistically classify other answers to be true or false. This can be used to increase the speed and accuracy of human validators, not to replace them.
    – FNia
    Commented Feb 14 at 23:57
  • 7
    @FNia Please cite sources for your claims (especially the claim that LLMs can probabilistically classify the truth of answers). Our overwhelming experience is that current LLM technology cannot reliably do any of those things, at least within the domain to which it's being applied here. If we enter a world in which the way people use LLMs does not generate large quantities of plausible-looking incorrect information, then we may reconsider the ban. That is not the world we live in, however; thus, the ban.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Feb 15 at 0:03
  • @RyanM The verification responsibility is on the poster. Yes, definitely ban the "10-second blind copy-pasted answers from ChatGPT", but that's not what this ban says. It simply doesn't care if you spent 10 seconds to paste it, or spent minutes or hours to verify and edit the answer before posting it. It bans all cases, which doesn't make sense.
    – FNia
    Commented Feb 15 at 0:08
  • 6
    Could you please explain how to tell whether a poster did verify it? (without verifying it ourselves; see my previous comment for why that doesn't work) Plenty of people claim to have verified their AI-generated answers, and yet their answers are still wrong.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Feb 15 at 0:12
  • There is no way to make sure the poster did verify it, and there is no way to make sure LLMs have not been used in part or all of the answer. You can only verify the answer itself for correctness, and LLMs can help with that. There are many studies on the use of LLMs for fact checking. It's definitely a new and evolving field, but the general understanding seems to be that "the best defense against [LLM] is [LLM] itself". I'll put some citations below.
    – FNia
    Commented Feb 15 at 1:01
  • 2
    - Defending Against Neural Fake News: arxiv.org/abs/1905.12616 - FACT-GPT: Fact-Checking Augmentation via Claim Matching with LLMs: arxiv.org/html/2402.05904v1 - Are Large Language Models Good Fact Checkers: A Preliminary Study: arxiv.org/abs/2311.17355 - The perils and promises of fact-checking with large language models: frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/frai.2024.1341697/full - (Probabilistic classification:) Generative AI Text Classification using Ensemble LLM Approaches: arxiv.org/pdf/2309.07755.pdf
    – FNia
    Commented Feb 15 at 1:16
  • These are of course not ready solutions to deploy on this platform, but are the general trends and approach to the matter of validity-checking human+AI-generated content. It's only a matter of time before we get there, and I believe the focus should be on going in that direction, rather than suppressing AI use altogether.
    – FNia
    Commented Feb 15 at 1:23
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    @FNia "These are of course not ready solutions to deploy on this platform" Exactly. The tooling required for the proposed policy change does not practically exist - for all intents and purposes, they are functionally magic in any policy. Mind, that does not mean it cannot exist in the future, but it means any policy that relies on it cannot work today. SO does not exist to provide the focus for future AI research, it exists to be SO today. Mind, AI research is well able to set their own focus and not affected by the ban here. Commented Feb 15 at 5:13
  • 1
    @FNia, if or when tooling to factually check answers will exist, this very much will be a reason to reconsider this policy (and I'd personally say reconsider existence of SO in its current form). Until then, in light of extreme abuse by the generatedanswers, threatening usability of the site, this ban deemed to be the only viable solution.
    – markalex
    Commented Feb 15 at 8:04
  • 5
    If you have proposition, how to workaround mentioned abuse with existing right now technologies, please share it: many people would like to here it. But be warned, simply saying "community should go and verify every answer" wouldn't cut it.
    – markalex
    Commented Feb 15 at 8:08
  • 1
    Bogus answers (for example, likely most code dumps (answers without any explanation whatsoever)) and plagiarised answers were already a problem before ChatGPT. ChatGPT made it orders of magnitude worse. Commented Mar 3 at 0:28
-22

I fully respect the rules of Stack Overflow, but I want to highlight how technology, including language models like LLMs, plays a crucial role in the empowerment of people with disabilities. The goal of rights and regulations should be to promote a positive evolution of society. As a proof of transparency, wouldn't it be better to specify that a response has been assisted by an LLM?

Could we not offer an honest prompt for all Dys for example?


Thank you all for your comments. You can understand that for those who don't grasp how generative intelligence offers a significant advantage in terms of compensation for language disorders, if in the future the major evolution of artificial intelligence does not allow a site like Stack Overflow to make a difference, it is necessary in my opinion to accompany the transition and make it as transparent as possible.

It is obvious that many developers use generative algorithms without saying so, and with their improvement, it is quite possible that it will be difficult to detect them. Note that the fact that you have used an artificial intelligence is important data for future algorithms that will use the data generated by Stack Overflow.

Moreover, in language disorders for example, the contribution of artificial intelligence, with tools like generative AI, allows for a great improvement in language quality. It should be noted that many people in the world of science have this type of disorder, from Moses to Thomas Edison to Leonardo da Vinci, Einstein.

For this reason, I think it is not good to prohibit the use of generative artificial intelligence, particularly for disability and for the future evolution of this type of technology, and that it is more judicious to mention it. I understand that some people will never do it, but ethics is an individual question. Should everyone be punished for the fault of some and not others?

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    How can we trust users to add that "This is AI-generated" disclaimer to their answers? We can't. This has been suggested a lot, already, and frankly, just isn't reliable.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 24 at 9:12
  • 9
    Yes, it would be better. But people don't do it. We could have a lot of nice things if people wouldn't sabotage things... Commented Mar 24 at 9:17
  • I understand your concerns regarding the reliability of AI assistance disclosures. However, with technological advancements, it will become increasingly difficult to differentiate between contributions generated by AI and those created by humans. This is also an issue of accessibility for some people.
    – gregory l
    Commented Mar 24 at 9:38
  • 6
    AI has a distinguishable writing style, one that's not very common in how you'd normally answer on SO. That said, if an answer is of such (writing and factual) quality that it is indistinguishable from a completely human-written answer, there's not much of a problem.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 24 at 12:45
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    I don't doubt that ChatGPT is helpful to some people with disabilities, but that doesn't change the fact that the answers it generates aren't reliable enough to be allowed on the site.
    – F1Krazy
    Commented Mar 24 at 12:56
  • 9
    We understand that you think allowing generative AI is useful. However, there are many issues with generative AI that aren't solved yet, such as its factual inaccuracy. A lot of these concerns have been discussed in-depth on answers on this question, so I'd strongly suggest you read through that first. Your suggestion is far from new, but nobody came up with a viable way to make it workable, yet.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 24 at 13:37
  • 5
    "It should be noted that many people in the world of science have this type of disorder, from Moses to Thomas Edison to Leonardo da Vinci, Einstein." Flat what. Commented Mar 24 at 13:40
  • 1
    Sorry, @MisterMiyagi, I don't understand where you're going with this ?
    – gregory l
    Commented Mar 24 at 13:44
  • 3
    @gregoryl That's fitting, because I didn't understand where you were going with this. My comment was supposed to express that with quoting the most (but not only) outlandish and tangential part of the content you recently added. I'm literally unable to put my confusion into words, hence a flat what. Commented Mar 24 at 14:12
  • 1
    OK :-), I understand, but please realize that for me, it's complicated to explain without going into too much detail, a topic that you seem not to be familiar with, regarding health and the impact that AI can have on this issue.
    – gregory l
    Commented Mar 24 at 14:21
  • 12
    @gregoryl Point is, your new content isn't going into detail but into meaningless (and questionable) tangents. You aren't actually explaining anything this way. If this is what AI writes for you, this is a good sign you should not use it. True, it may be difficult for some of us to express ourselves, but do not be fooled into thinking AI expresses yourself better than you do. It just seems fancier. Commented Mar 24 at 14:37
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    @gregoryl MisterMiyagi is trying to explain to you why this answer is poorly received. From "our" perspective, it looks like you're the one who doesn't want to hear that, do you understand that? Your suggestion is clear, but how that would work, with the issues LLMs have in mind, is something you need to explain. It's irrelevant what historical figures might have had some disability. Again, please read through the other suggestions on here. It's a lot, but that also means there's a lot of research and debate that has already gone into this.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 24 at 15:11
  • "I fully respect the rules of Stack Overflow" No, you don't. As you have been posting AI answers even after you have been informed that it is not allowed. "...wouldn't it be better to specify that a response has been assisted by an LLM" Why didn't you specify that this answer is LLM assisted then?
    – Dalija Prasnikar Mod
    Commented May 21 at 12:04
-23

I, personally, think that there's not much we, as a community, can do to stop AI-generated content from being used on the site in the long term. Furthermore, I think that the long-term is what we should be focusing on.

The future of AI in a different timeline

The current banhammer stopgap may work for now, but it's a simple solution requiring manpower, and it won't be viable forever. Who here remembers when Dragon Naturally Speaking came out on CD in the 90s? I was 8 or 9 when my grandfather got us a copy. We had an old beige microphone, and my friends and family were absolutely amazed at the speech recognition capability. They could dictate documents directly into Microsoft Works, and I could.... Well... Do what 9-year-olds do best: See how many curse words it could recognize... Even if you had to enunciate them.

Fast forward a couple of years and the same software could recognize multiple individuals in a single conversation and create a transcript including respective speakers. Fast forward a few more years and Microsoft has added "Train your computer to better understand you"1, so enunciation is no longer an obstacle.

That 10-year timespan I just covered would be easy to react to as a community. The problem is AI doesn't take 10 years, it takes 10 hours2. It's easy to spot right now (question rephrased to statement followed by bullet points for your vanilla ChatGPT) but what happens when we get the option to "Train your computer to better type like you"? The Insider Build of Windows 11 (Dev Channel) currently has a Copilot preview that can access your active tab3. I'm certain Microsoft Office access will be next, so It's only a few steps away at most in my opinion.

My opinion moving forward

My thought is this... The banhammer on AI-generated content that isn't cited should continue. However, we should move towards a system that accepts it, so long as it's clearly marked/cited as machine generated4 and there should rarely, if ever, be a top answer marked that is wholly AI-generated. As we move towards that system, the 30-day bans need to turn into 90-day bans. If we incorporate automated detection at some point, it should be human-reviewed, and 90 days should turn into 180 days. I do not see this as too harsh of a punishment so long as users have been explicitly warned.

I believe that if history (as a whole) has shown us anything, it's that we cannot simply ignore a problem, sweep it under the run, and expect it to go away. Band-aids are temporary, but AI is not. Humans have suppressed so many different things over the years... Catholics persecuted Presbyterians as heretics in the Middle Ages, Americans in the land of the free bought and sold black slaves to tend their households and farmlands, women were expected to quietly obey their husbands without a voice to vote until the 1900s, and Jews... Well, Jews have gotten the shaft since the dawn of time.

I'm not saying that AI deserves citizenship or human rights[5]. But as widespread as AI will inevitably become, and as integrated into our lives as it will we need to treat it that way.

TLDR:

We should standardize a boilerplate for AI content and require anyone incorporating it into their content to use it. We should continue the 30-day ban stopgap until a point where it's no longer needed. We should work towards a way of automating the recognition of AI-generated content that isn't cited, always require human review of this automation's output to reduce false positives and implement very steep consequences for those who violate the rules.

Again, all of this is just my opinion. I've been a lurker for 7 years, but as you can see from my reputation, I haven't been active until this past week (I've started to enjoy teaching and tutoring in IT). So, in the grand scheme of things, my 2 cents is literally just that, 2 cents. But I hope that at least a few of you will share somewhat similar opinions. Thanks for your time :)

Clarification on long-term viability and manpower

I do not necessarily think there will be a need to patrol AI-generated content forever. At least, I hope there isn't... However, dumping everything into implementing 30-day bans as stopgaps can't be the answer. Because if we're relying on humans to recognize AI-generated content, we will fail no matter what. I'm not necessarily saying we should absolutely do anything specific. I'm only saying that we need to look much further ahead than much of the discussion going on here.

I do not know what technology drives Stack Exchange on the backend. But the technology has to move forward to account for AI content. Whether you call this a forum, a wiki, an image board, a social media network, or anything else... The technology underneath needs to move forward. To stress this point again if we're relying on humans to recognize AI-generated content, we're going to fail no matter what

What's stopping users from simply not adding the boilerplate?

As Stack Overflow is built on a foundation of user trust, there's nothing that can be done to prevent this except moderating content. Though, in my opinion, adding the boilerplate at least lets the userbase know it's expected. I found out via a comment warning when skimming through questions.

But AI content can't reliably be detected?

I'm not asking for someone to look into this or share information related to site analytics or any other privileged information. However, I would postulate that greater than 65% of users who have been banned for posting AI generated content are newer users trying to boost their reputation. Furthermore, I would estimate that greater than 80% of those are using a vanilla ChatGPT based AI, of which greater than 95% are "non-precise" style (This high percentage is based on the difficulty of getting a reliable output to open ended questions.)

I want to point out an assumption in my argument. I'm looking at this from the point of view that if you know enough about AI to use anything outside of what's available on the mainstream channels, you likely have the experience to answer the questions without using AI content or to examine the content for accuracy before posting it. As mentioned in the previous section, I am basing this assumption off the foundation of trust.

If those numbers are remotely close, then the additional review queue should not require much additional overhead to patrol a large portion of violations. I can quite easily imagine a natural language string analysis algorithm combined with a user event timing algorithm that could pick out a relatively high percentage of violations. I'm sure there are many users way more talented than myself who could imagine the same in a far more optimized and efficient way.

An alternative

If patrolling content and review queues are too far-fetched, then maybe instead of targeting users, we should target posts (I thought this was mentioned in one of the comment threads, but I couldn't find it on a second look). Automated boilerplate addition to user posts if they are flagged as AI generated by an algorithm. A certain reputation level allows an individual to remove the boilerplate. A higher reputation level will automatically bypass the check on their posts.


If policing content isn't the answer, then decriminalization and regulation is.


[1] There was a step in between, where Microsoft let you correct its understanding with input rather than via prompt; See This MiPad Research Article

[2] Keep in mind that AI can't just pick up any task and do it quicker and better. Take for instance the following study in which it took an AI 924 hours to learn a game that would take humans less than 30 minutes:

  • Lake, Brenden & Ullman, Tomer & Tenenbaum, Joshua & Gershman, Samuel. (2016). Building Machines That Learn and Think Like People. CBMM Memo No. 046.

[3] Verified the knowledge is public before posting, See This Public Blog Post on Windows.com

[4] We should probably require citing the exact AI that generated it. I foresee that as an upcoming IP battle in the near future. Plus, as always, there are going to be biases on AI sources that could affect the community as a whole if we don't.

[5] Yet... But I can't convince myself to rule that out at some point in the future, the human brain is only so complex, and technology is surely, albeit slowly, getting there.

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    "We should standardize a boilerplate for AI content and require anyone incorporating it into their content to use it." and...if somebody doesn't? We'd still need the manpower that the start of your post claims is not viable forever. So...you want AI generated output to be embraced but we should still pour the same amount of effort into detecting "illegitimate" usage of AI generated content?
    – VLAZ
    Commented Aug 27, 2023 at 12:11
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    As with many other proposals to integrate/accommodate GenAI answers, I’m still missing the "why". What’s the point building a repository of things we can just generate? If GenAI reaches a point at which it can reliably generate answers then SO is obsolete and we - the users - can do better things with our time than nanny some algorithm that far outscales us anyway. Commented Aug 27, 2023 at 15:14
  • @VLAZ Edited for clarification of my stance. Commented Aug 27, 2023 at 15:25
  • 8
    Nothing you suggest is feasible. AI content can't reliably be detected, and yet another review queue isn't a solution either. Also, what's to prevent users from just not adding the "This is AI-generated" boilerplate?
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Aug 27, 2023 at 18:19
  • @Cerbrus Updated answer to address your concerns, including an alternative to policing content. Commented Aug 28, 2023 at 0:13
  • Also, thank you to both of you who edited my answer. I am terrible with grammar and consistency in voice. I also didn't know that blockquotes were considered abusive when used for formatting. I always read through edits and try to learn from them, I really appreciate it. Commented Aug 28, 2023 at 0:15
  • 1
    I don't think your edits answer the questions above :(
    – M--
    Commented Aug 28, 2023 at 0:43
  • 2
    Your edits don't answer my concerns... At all...
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Aug 28, 2023 at 7:50
-25

On the flipside?

I would like to argue that there is one class of AI writing that should be explicitly allowed.

Specifically, when an AI like ChatGPT gets a series of questions for which it cannot produce adequate answers, the AI should produce a composite question about it. This should also include statements of why it doesn't consider its own answers adequate. This should then be asked here, as an official post from the AI (as in the user might be "ChatGPT" or the like).

The point here is to increase the corpus of knowledge.


Having said all that, I do believe that answers or questions pasted from ChatGPT or the like should be banned.

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    And how exactly would an AI chatbot know it doesn't know something? Or why it doesn't know it? Often enough it just hallucinates an answer. The way to figure out it doesn't work is for an expert to have a look at it. If the expert finds the answer is nonsense, then they can write a question instead. Although, with that said - just because an AI tool is unable to properly answer a question, it does not mean the question is unique and never before seen.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jan 29 at 18:34
  • Nothing of this seems to be suitable for SO with current quality of "understanding" provided by any of the models. What you describe sounds like human powered correction mechanism for models, and I don't see why this should be a part of SO or wider SE network.
    – markalex
    Commented Jan 29 at 18:47
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    Ironically that's what OverflowAI search is designed to do, isn't it? Find/summarize existing answers, and if there are none help you generate a question.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 29 at 19:51
  • @VLAZ it would obviously require the AI have a fair bit of self-monitoring included in it. They may or may not be able to at this point. In any case, it's not for StackExchange / SO to do, but for the AI writers. The only part for StackExchange / SO is allowing the relevant user to exist and question.
    – David G.
    Commented Jan 29 at 22:32
  • Self-monitoring? you mean using an LLM to determine if an LLM is accurate?
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 29 at 22:33
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    @DavidG. There's no "May or may not". LLMs do not have any idea of the concept of "truth". They're utterly clueless. What you suggest it beyond impossible, as LLMs are simply not capable of interpreting "truth".
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jan 30 at 8:17
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    So, what you're suggesting doesn't match up with the current reality. You want AI generated questions to be allowed conditioned on the AI tool working not at all how it works as of today. You're free to suggest to all AI tool makers they should change their products to be able to do the introspection you expect of them. Once that is done, we can discuss changing what we do and do not allow for AI generated questions.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jan 30 at 8:21
  • @Cerbrus Completely wrong. AIs do have an idea of "truth". With SO as a source, an accepted answer is more likely "truth" than a non-accepted one. An answer from a high status poster is more likely "truth" than from a low status poster. I suspect this is already used. Having said that, it probably doesn't know truth in the real world, so it shouldn't be trained on an RPG corpus to answer medical questions.
    – David G.
    Commented Jan 30 at 16:51
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    i mean, no, lol, there's a reason accepted answers are no longer pinned to the top.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 30 at 17:00
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    I mean, no, lol, there's plenty of highly scored answers that are wrong.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 30 at 17:03
  • 1
    The point is there is no idea of truth that can be trusted to just be correct, even for human provided content the viewer is responsible for determining that. Having the AI rely on metrics humans provided in the past but no longer are because the AI replaced the process that resulted in that feedback will be stale immediately.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 30 at 17:06
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    An AI summary of an answer is an AI answer.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 30 at 17:16
  • 4
    @DavidG. No. LLMs don't have a concept of truth. Don't strawman me with theories about AI in general. LLMs like ChatGPT don't comprehend. They don't understand, they don's interpret. There is literally no concept of technical accuracy in their process. That's the entire problem with LLMs! They can't know if what they generate is true or not. That's simply not part of how they work. [1/2]
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jan 30 at 22:13
  • 3
    @DavidG. LLMs like ChatGPT don't "do" "source". They can't weigh different training data differently unless explicitly trained to do so. It would make no sense for a generic LLM like ChatGPT to put excessive weight on SO sources, as that would result in lower quality output when generating stories. It doesn't have live access to data. It doesn't know who posted what. It doesn't know anything about scores. You're making so many incorrect assumptions about how LLMs work... Please look into how they generate output. [2/2]
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jan 30 at 22:16
  • 2
    "AI" solutions that are capable of citing sources aren't working like your standard LLM prompt. They start with a different kind of AI, not an LLM, to perform a more typical search before sending the results into an LLM as a prompt to generate the response. It'd be incorrect to claim the LLM is sourcing it's data, since the data that is allowing it to do the work it's doing isn't just the content in the prompt that the initial search found.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 30 at 22:20
-27

I think Peter's answer has the right spirit, but the wrong implementation. We might need to get comfortable with this technology being around in the long term, and one way to stop the abuse it might generate is to build it into the system with the necessary precautions and abuse prevention mechanisms.

Make no mistake: the genie is out of the bottle. You can't put it back in. You can't wish it away. This is going to be a thing going forward, and it doesn't even have to be a problem.

Basically, you create some kind of system user that posts an AI-generated answer to ~every question. (Maybe ask the bot if this looks like the sort of question that belongs on Stack Overflow first, so you don't start automatically answering obviously-off-topic questions like "How is babby formed?", although that can be gamed and that's a concern.) You mark it as a bot. You surround the answer with the necessary warnings. Its answers are all community wiki, meaning the bot never gains any reputation and users are encouraged to edit the answer if it's only slightly wrong. The bot automatically deletes its own answers if they get a low enough score. Other people trying to run a ChatGPT Stack Overflow gold rush for Internet brownie points would find themselves unable to keep up with this system user, and would stop trying.

You run this for a while, determine if it's successful or not, and... if I was your CFO, I'd better hope it's not, because as other comments show, this might not be a very cheap model to run (even if you had a license from the creators to run it for $0). I can't imagine Stack Overflow staying sustainable as a commercial entity if it has to pay an AI tax on every single question on the website.

The good news is that, if this does become too expensive for Stack Overflow, it's gonna also be too expensive for random Joe's trying to gain cheap reputation this way — and that probably also means the end of the gold rush of people who just want to write "make number go up with AI" blog posts.

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    I'd like to point out that OpenAI probably pays big time right now for the server, GPU and memory and electricity it uses, not even considering the training costs (these typically range in the lower single-digit millions for complex language models). An OpenAI-paid-for ChatGPT answer is going to be really expensive if someone actually needs to pay for it. (We're talking spacefaring carbuilding lunatic billionaire-sized venture capital being burnt here.) Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 11:37
  • 3
    Yes, I addressed that point towards the end. It's possible that, even if successful, this trial can't work for financial reasons. The good news is that, if this does become too expensive for Stack Overflow, it's gonna also be too expensive for random Joe's trying to gain cheap reputation this way. My understanding is that the problem, for now, is the gold rush of random Joe's trying to get a number to go up.
    – badp
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 11:40
  • 6
    ChatGPT does not give a canonical answer to a certain question. If you ask the same question multiple times, you will get multiple different answers that sometimes even make conflicting statements. There seems to be a random element used when the AI generates its answer.
    – NineBerry
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 11:55
  • 4
    So an automated bot dumps crap answers on questions... You're missing one glaring problem: ChatGPT doesn't return the same answer for the exact same question twice, so any user that probably also doesn't use the exact same input will absolutely get a different answer... This solution can't solve anything, other than a overflowing wallet.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 11:55
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    "if this does become too expensive for Stack Overflow, it's gonna also be too expensive for random Joe's trying to gain cheap reputation this way" A thousand users with a thousand free / trial accounts can posts tens of thousands of generated answers... SE, a single entity, will have to fork over cash for every single answer they automatically generate. You can't compare corporate usage with individual usage.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 12:01
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    This would defeat the purpose of Stack Overflow. It actually sounds like a completely different service. GH Copilot is doing something like that already, doesn't it?
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 12:25
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    @badp No, I am saying that the purpose of Stack Overflow is to provide quality answers to common problems. These answers can then be found by humans searching for the same issues. A bot answering every question on Stack Overflow would go against the purpose of the site. We already have this issue with some users who add a code-only answer or repeat the same solution on multiple questions.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 12:32
  • 4
    @badp Because they looked for it already on Google. Asking a question on Stack Overflow is the last resort. It means that a question like that hasn't been asked by anyone else yet.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 12:39
  • 3
    @Dharman that's desired user behaviour, not actual user behaviour. If things were that easy, we'd never need to close questions as duplicate.
    – badp
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 12:40
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    The problem this ban is meant to solve is that ChatGPT can produce answers in seconds which require minutes of multiple people's time to verify if they are worth having on the site or not, and that is a waste of time when a large proportion of such answers are not worth having on the site. If every question automatically received an answer like that, it would make the problem worse, not better, by requiring more people to spend more time verifying and voting on those answers.
    – kaya3
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 13:09
  • 4
    There are many questions on Stack Overflow which the person asking cannot try out first hand and see if they are correct. Consider a question like "will a linked list be more efficient than an array in this case?" with an answer like "a linked list will be more efficient because most of the operations are at the start of the list". If the OP was able to try it out and see which was more efficient then they wouldn't have asked the question, and the answer doesn't tell them how to try it out. "What is the time complexity of this algorithm?" is another class of such questions, which ...
    – kaya3
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 14:05
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    ... Stack Overflow already has a lot of users posting (non-AI-written) answers that "seem right", that the OP may be satisfied with, but are wrong in ways which cannot be demonstrated by "trying them out" (and this often makes it hard to convince the person who wrote the answer that they are wrong, too). Bad answers like that waste a lot of people's time, the site needs less of them, not more. As for "voting is integral to the site", of course it is, but the site is better off if experts spend their time writing good answers, instead of checking and downvoting rubbish answers.
    – kaya3
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 14:08
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    That presupposes that there are rubbish answers which need to be downvoted in order to be removed from sight. But what you're proposing is to create those rubbish answers, automatically, en masse.
    – kaya3
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 14:37
  • 4
    @badp If the answers weren't rubbish, this wouldn't have been a problem in the first place. Duh. The whole entire friggin issue here is users posting AI-generated content en masse, without checking the answers.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 14:43
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    A super power people crave is being able to express themselves better. I think you're right in that this isn't going away, and if implemented as assistive instead of prescriptive, could result in people writing way better questions. I also see the potential to help people write answers too, but perhaps as a coach and not a co-author. I think it could do what guided "wizards" just don't do very well.
    – user50049
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 18:41
-28

It's just a suggestion. People will keep posting ChatGPT answers anyway. The problem is now that a user can't really differentiate them.

A solution I would suggest which is already mentioned here, but different, is not only to proactively post an answer from ChatGPT (or other models), but intentionally ranks them lower and banner them clearly that this answer is not yet checked by a human. Then a person can confirm, edits, or reject the answer, which will change the rating of the answer itself (this ChatGPT answer have been reviewed by X and rated as correct).

If an open source model is used, then Stack Overflow have even more data to train their own model which will beat all other AI models...

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    I think you're massively underestimating the effort that goes into training this kind of model... Also, why does the generated answer need te be on SO? Why can't a user that wants an AI-generated answer just go to said AI?
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 13:52
  • 4
    If the AI reliably produces correct answers - why build a library of them at all? If the AI does not reliably produce correct answers - how many and which answers should be posted? Critically, how should volunteers deal with the required massive content volume when we already have too few people for the fewer human generated answers? Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 19:52
  • Re "not yet checked by a human": This doesn't (and didn't) even happen with human-generated answers to any significant extend. Why would anyone spend time checking a code dump answer (no explanation whatsoever)? Yes, that is a rhetorical question. A code dump answer may be completely bogus or brilliant. It is difficult to judge unless significant time is spend to actual run and test the code. Commented Sep 20, 2023 at 21:03
  • I must admit I do not actually dislike this idea as much as most other suggestions at face-value. I mean it's not what I would like, but if a compromise had to be struck, in the event where we cannot absolutely reliably ban ai generated answers, I would choose a somewhat "site-approved" or even better, "site-trained" ai answer generator. Commented Sep 21, 2023 at 0:34
  • Like let's see how good exactly can we train a model exclusively on SO content to answer duplicates. Commented Sep 21, 2023 at 0:34
  • @Cerbrus, the second question in your comment isn’t a relevant as it may seem. You ask why something can’, while of course an asker can and is not prevented from doing so regardless. Just as the asker could rtfm or get an answer elsewhere. It’s however about answerers using AI, who do that regardless of what the asker could do.
    – Xartec
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 12:35
  • 3
    @Xartec Rowanto is arguing that SO should implement GPT to automate answers. That's what my "Why" is asking about. Why do we need to invest time in implementing generated crappy answers, when users can get that nonsense at the source, instead?
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 13:13
  • @Xartec "It’s however about answerers using AI" To the contrary. This answer is about SO itself using AI, which then - somehow - removes the issue/occurrence of answerers using AI and - somehow - offers a benefit to askers. Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 13:24
  • @MisterMiyagi that’s what his proposed solution is about. His answer is a solution adressing the problem as layed out in the second sentence.
    – Xartec
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 20:57
  • @Cerberus “ Why do we need to invest time in implementing generated crappy answers, when users can get that nonsense at the source, instead?” This, again, relies solely on the false idea AI generated answers are crappy and nonsense. Which is is like building a house on quicksand, as chat gpt would say. The quality of the answers can be heavily improved by prompt engineering which would discourage answerers from using the same ai to produce sub par results. It would be a sensible way to introduce AI, an inevitable situation.
    – Xartec
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 21:03
  • 3
    @Xartec they've already tried that, it failed spectacularly. Many other sites are similarly trying this, such as quora, and are having similarly questionable results. Why must SO include AI generated answers? What value would that provide? Surely the best person to have a conversation with a chatbot and weed out poor results is the person with the problem being solved, not some rep hunter on SO or SO itself.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 21:06
  • 2
    @Xartec Yes, and we've been routinely deleting said answers for nearly a year now. Yes, we haven't gotten all of them, but we've gotten enough, and enough accounts are actioned against to keep the problem at bay. Your assertion that we cannot discern whether or not content was written by AI is quite provably false.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 21:19
  • 2
    There is no magic prompt engineering masterpiece that will suddenly make any current or near release version of gpt capable of producing answers to new questions. At best it can summarize an existing answer to an already answered question, however even that becomes more likely to hallucinate than to provide an accurate answer the more you allow it to modify the content it is summarizing to fit the person looking for an answer. The user would be better off just getting the existing answer.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 27, 2023 at 21:34
  • 2
    "The problem is now that a user can't really differentiate them." - It's trivial to identify ChatGPT generated content. The only way to handle ChatGPT content is to ban it. Commented Nov 1, 2023 at 13:44
-30

I honestly believe ChatGPT is a powerful tool, but in reality it doesn't give exactly what we want. All the answers posted are from real legends who put their hands on the code and tried the solution. I would say it would be disrespectful to mix AI answers with human answers because the AI is trained from human answers.

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    ChatGPT is insanely great and is a powerful tool, but it will also produce answers that are totally wrong and/or made up. It can not be trusted. Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 13:33
-31

Instead of banning ChatGPT, Stack Overflow could consider adding a new button "Show AI Generated Answer(s)" to each question page. Such answers should be hidden by default, but if anybody is curious about what ChatGPT (or any other future AI tool of the day) has to say about it, they can check it out.

Also, such AI-generated answers could be compared to the "human"-generated answers with another AI tool to compute a similarity score, and if a "human"-generated answer is too similar to an AI-generated one, then such an answer should be banned (since the probability that such "human" answer has actually been produced using an AI tool would be high) and the user who posted it could be given some penalty.

So, this approach would kill two birds with one stone - people would be much less likely to post AI-generated answers since such answers would already be there automatically, and Stack Overflow would get an automated tool for detecting AI-generated answers and for punishing users who abuse the "no AI-generated answers" policy.

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    No? People aren't going to go through the rigor of ensuring that the answer they see or read is comprehensible or useful for their use case. We already have cases of people copying code from Stack Overflow and putting it into production. This doesn't make that better; it actually makes it orders of magnitude worse.
    – Makoto
    Commented Feb 1, 2023 at 21:47
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    People already barely follow instructions like How to Ask and How to Answer. The problem we see with lots of AI-generated answers is that the people who post them do so blindly, without verifying that it answers the question or testing for bugs. I doubt asking these low-effort posters to put in more effort to self-identify (even though it's barely any effort to check a box) is going to have the effect you desire. Until such time as AI-generated answers are reliably correct, if people are interested in what the AI has to say, they can go talk to it at the AI's website.
    – pho
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 0:08
  • I don't think this is a bad idea. You cannot stop anyone from looking for AI-generated answers. The point is not to be vindictive of AI generate responses but to let others decide if those are accurate or even helpful. In my experience apart from answering basic questions, pre-2021, ChatGTP has not provided any relevance. This data can also be useful in future to train better models.
    – Rahul
    Commented Feb 7, 2023 at 22:37
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    if people want AI generated answers, there's a place for that. (it isn't here)
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 7, 2023 at 22:52
  • Not sure why this was downvoted but i can understand why when everyone are so angry and ban-happy already... This is the least-effort and also most realistic way of fixing the problem now and forever. It will always work too, because chatgpt will always produce grammatically correct answers(even if completely wrong) and a similarity algo should be feasible to implement(ie: not too complex). It is also the only answer where it saves SO users from cleaning up and saves SO from becoming more authoritarian(it already is too authoritarian for many users...)
    – n00p
    Commented Feb 24, 2023 at 7:30
  • This is a great suggestion. I wrote an answer similar to yours but with the added usage of a tag to help StackOverflow filter out or correct AI generated answers. Unfortunately, the senior members of this forum do not encourage any type of interaction with known AI answers. I understand their reasoning. The big question is how will they be able to tell the difference otherwise? More AI detection? Is OK to use AI to "detect" AI generated answers, but it's not OK to submit AI generated answers? Seems like a paradox to me.
    – Catriel
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 15:03
-34

Yes, it should be banned. To the question of "How do we identify those posts?", it should be considered that this problem is not new or unique to Stack Overflow. Plagiarism is a concern that spans broadly. An answer found in academia is to copy/paste answers back into ChatGPT and see if it responds to it as a continuation of a conversation; if it does, then flag it as AI-generated.

This is a potential technique, and one that scales. Multiple suggestions here imply that "you can tell it by looking at it", which isn't all that helpful because we can't expect people to reliably keep up with the potentially exponential flow of spam answers.

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    No, that's not at all accurate. ChatGPT just pretends. It can't recognize its own output.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jan 18, 2023 at 1:07
  • 14
    The conversation chains in ChatGPT are separate. Every time you start a new chat, it keeps that session for that session only. I've seen nothing to imply that it persists any information cross-sessions. In fact, what I do for amusement is ask ChatGPT where my hometown is located and it gives me a new, amusing, and mostly wrong information every time. You can try to correct it but if I start a new session it goes back to the nonsensical information again.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jan 18, 2023 at 7:38
  • 1
    Re "...is to copy/paste answers back into ChatGPT and it will respond to it as a continuation of the conversation": Interesting. Do you have some examples and/or references for that? Commented Jan 18, 2023 at 18:55
  • @PeterMortensen openai-openai-detector.hf.space
    – n8.
    Commented Jan 19, 2023 at 16:40
  • Also this: nypost.com/2022/12/26/…
    – n8.
    Commented Jan 19, 2023 at 16:42
  • My main point is that SO isn't the only one suffering from this issue, and to try and concoct a solution internally is wacky. Smart people are already very far down this road, we have search engines to identify who they are.
    – n8.
    Commented Jan 19, 2023 at 16:43
  • 7
    this just isn't really relevant to the conversation, tbh. We aren't expecting users to go out and look for chatgpt answers to report. That's not what this is about. Mods and other involved users are already on the case and already know how to find such answers and deal with them. Obviously, report things you think are chatgpt answers, but we don't need this to be a witch hunt.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jan 19, 2023 at 16:51
  • 8
    @n8. If that is your main point, you might want to edit your answer to actually say so. Right now the prominent focus is on a single suggestion that doesn’t actually work as described. Commented Jan 19, 2023 at 18:35
  • To test this, I pasted one of my own more extensive answers into ChatGPT and asked if it was ChatGPT's? It said it was. So the problem remains the same as always, ChatGPT confidently lies when it answers questions -- any and all questions. Commented Mar 25 at 0:57
-36

Banning all ChatGPT answers is a good temporary move, as it opens a time window where it could be discussed thoroughly, but it, IMO, shouldn't be permanent, as it could also help if used according to its capabilities and by acknowledging its limitations.

Consider the following situation:

Someone sees a question they know the answer to.

They don't want to worry about the structure of the answer, so they use ChatGPT with a prompt that directs it towards the correct answer of the problem (for example, if the question is "How do I remove and get the last element of an array?", a possible prompt might be "Using the array.pop method, write a Stack Overflow answer to the question ..."

They then check and verify the answer to see if ChatGPT has done any mistakes, and either direct ChatGPT to correct the answer, or correct it themselves.

They then post the answer.

Is this helpful to SO? I would assume it is as the user who asked their question gets an answer that works, and the answerer spends less time formulating and explaining the answer and more time worrying about the correctness of the answer. As ChatGPT is a language model, here it would have been used correctly according to its capabilities (language and not programming - the programming knowledge comes from the answerer).

Should this be banned permanently? Permanently banning all ChatGPT answers means this should be banned as well, even though it actually is helpful to the Q&A format we have going on here.

Bad ChatGPT answers are just bad answers, and I don't think we should have another rule specifically for ChatGPT. Spamming good-looking but bad answers with AI tools and abandoning them to "see the numbers go up" should be the behavior that is banned.

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    The problem is that users have been proven to be untrustworthy, and have been going for quantity over quality when using the AI to generate answers. Besides, answers that are simple enough for the AI to consistently answer correctly, generally have excellent due targets on SO... TL;DR: There's nothing of value to SO, generated from CGPT.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 16:44
  • 4
    The use-case described by this answer would be a great way to use ChatGPT. Unfortunately, it's not how it's currently used. On the long run, we have to find a way how responsible use of AI can be allowed while still having methods to prevent flooding the site with garbage.
    – BDL
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 17:41
  • 1
    I had a similar thought: What if you have the skills and willingness to validate the AI-generated answer, even if you didn't come up with it? Such good-faith use of a chat AI by an actual expert would be completely indistinguishable from a human answer, and such use would be unenforceable. We're being asked here to self-enforce this ban on ourselves. If you don't want to self-enforce this ban on yourself, others may never notice, but you're crossing a different line here by publicly advocating that others not self-enforce themselves.
    – durette
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 18:36
  • 11
    There really isn't much value in carving out an exception for cases where the tool is used in a way such that it won't be recognizable as chatgpt and is actually producing valuable content, people using it have already proven that they're overwhelmingly unwilling to take those steps. People who are takin those steps aren't spamming the site with nonsense posts, but they're still potentially posting plagiarized content.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 18:45
  • 1
    "Is this helpful to SO?" To answer the question in the answer: Yes it is helpful. Caveat: only a minority will actually do it like this. But otherwhise it's a valid idea. Commented Dec 13, 2022 at 19:48
  • 2
    The main problem though, with this suggestion of augmented answering, is that you never know when the chat bot will randomly introduce fake or false information to support its possibly correct larger point. These nuanced false points might seem harmless if for example we are talking about resolving the argument of who won the last World Cup. The chat bot would perhaps make a comment like "Argentina won the 2022 World Cup. It was their third time matching up against France in the finals, and only the second time Messi won". That last part, unless you are truly informed, may seem real.
    – Travis J
    Commented Dec 24, 2022 at 7:28
  • 4
    In code, it can be dangerous to use those extra parts, especially since nuance is often very important (for example a wrong conversion to let's say, oh I don't know, feet to meters #mars). Perhaps with things of a more lenient nature, these white lies don't particularly harm anything, but when people's savings, kids, or lives are at stake, we can't just lightly gloss over such glaring inaccuracy.
    – Travis J
    Commented Dec 24, 2022 at 7:28
  • @TravisJ of course I am not suggesting people to blindly copy and paste those answers directly from ChatGPT, rather here, the tool would be used just as a glorified sentence generator, and the output it generates should then be left to the human operator to check. Commented Dec 27, 2022 at 22:25
  • 4
    @kahveciderin - Unfortunately a very large sample size of the minority have proven they cannot be trusted to use ChartGPT to help them submit an answer. They have proven they do not have the knowledge to confirm the answer content is (correct, accurate, ect.). That sample size has been extrapolated across multiple communities. Commented Dec 28, 2022 at 12:31
  • Main Problem with this Scenario I think, ... is that 'ChatGPT' doesn't check for DUPLICATES, oops...!
    – chivracq
    Commented Jan 15, 2023 at 3:17
  • I am against permanent ban, but not for the reasons given here. Everyone should be allowed to learn from their mistakes. It is as simple as that. Banning for a long time - sure. It needs to hurt to sink in. Permanent banning is needlessly extreme.
    – Gimby
    Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 14:20
-38

TL;DR: assimilate, don't exterminate!

I would like to see a separate section for AI-generated answers, i.e. why not just embrace it by retaining AI-generated answers but keeping them separate from human answers?

That serves two purposes:

  1. AI can distinguish AI-generated answers so that it doesn't feed them back into itself when they no doubt use ordered site content like this to generate answers.
  2. AI answers can still be viewed and voted on, and maybe some will even become the accepted answer.
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  • 13
    Why create more work, which will in turn create more work? A feature like what you suggest requires time to be put into implementing it, and then once the feature is made, it will require even more time by curators to confirm the content is not invalid. What is the benefit?
    – Daedalus
    Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 3:11
  • 22
    Specifically, following up on @Daedalus's comment, what is the benefit of integrating an AI service like ChatGPT directly into SO? People who want AI-generated responses can just ask the AI. That service already exists. People who want answers written by human experts can come to SO. We already provide that service. Why mix them? Beyond that, the reason we don't have a section for AI generated answers is the same reason we don't have a section for answers written by monkeys with typewriters: those answers are terrible. They don't meet our minimum quality standards. Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 6:00
  • 3
    Who's gonna pay for that? At the rate SO is getting questions, this would get very expensive very quickly.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 13:00
  • Who said the answers needed to be curated? And who said ChatGPT is the only AI? Come on people, this technology is only going to get better. Where's your imagination?
    – racitup
    Commented Feb 18, 2023 at 4:36
  • 20
    We don't create policies based on our imagination. We create them based on the reality that is in front of us, that we're dealing with right now. (As for who said the answers needed to be curated: that's the whole design principle/goal of this site.) Commented Feb 18, 2023 at 5:45
  • Okay, give it a year or two and let's see how SO is doing with your policy...
    – racitup
    Commented Mar 6, 2023 at 18:56
  • 9
    And why do you care about how SO will do in a year or two, with this or any other policy? just use whatever tool that works for you. that was true in the past, it's true now, and will be true in The Future (tm). if SO dies because something else replaces it... so be it. I don't get all these answers worried about "SO should adapt, or it will be replaced by something else!!!". Commented Mar 21, 2023 at 15:30
-39

Why not have all new questions include an automated answer by an official Stack Overflow ChatGPT account, with a clear indication that this is the ChatGPT response? Maybe even show the user the ChatGPT answer before the question is posted, to reduce duplicate/low-quality questions.

This way, it just gets the ChatGPT controversy out of the way... ironically, by embracing it. If the answer works, then great. If it doesn't work, well now at least there is a Stack Overflow sanctioned answer written by ChatGPT to compare new answers against. But if there's already a ChatGPT answer, why would anyone answer it with another ChatGPT answer?

If the problem is users abusing questions with quick, low quality answers... well that's a different problem; those users will always exist.

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    Because, to quote the question post: Overall, because the average rate of getting correct answers from ChatGPT is too low, the posting of answers created by ChatGPT is substantially harmful to the site and to users who are asking and looking for correct answers. Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 0:50
  • 27
    I don't get where you people are getting "the ChatGPT answer". There are multiple requests for this but they all fail at that point because ChatGPT doesn't give one answer. It generates statistically plausible text which can be different answers. Even if we assume that SO will show a ChatGPT answer at asking time and/or after posting a question, that answer need not be the same as you'd get from generating again. The claim that it would discourage others from posting a ChatGPT generated answer is basically unbacked by anything as it's not just the same text spewed out.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 4:44
  • 12
    For instance, here are two different ChatGPT responses to your suggestion. They're similar-ish, but about 20 seconds of editing could eliminate the most obvious parts. Also, an answer being posted already definitely doesn't stop people from posting the same general idea again.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 4:52
  • 14
    Self-contradictory (and wrong) within the same sentence: "Is the correct spelling "StackOverflow"?". Response: "Yes, that is correct. "Stack Overflow" is a popular question and answer website for programmers, and the correct spelling is "StackOverflow."" Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 13:40
  • 3
    And it only wants to please you (right or wrong): "Are you sure about the spelling?". Response: "I apologize for the confusion. While "StackOverflow" is a common way of writing the name of the website, the correct spelling is actually "Stack Overflow" with a space between the two words. Thank you for bringing this to my attention." Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 14:03
  • 1
    I'd support this. Seeing a GPT generated "here is an AI's best attempt" next to user created content would be good for the site. Commented May 3, 2023 at 19:56
  • 1
    @Yakk-AdamNevraumont Good, how? Users asking questions generally don't have the best understanding of the subject, and a convincingly written wrong answer would do more harm that good.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 14:10
  • @Cerbrus 1. It sometimes isn't wrong, 2. It competes with non-official AI answers, 3. It can provide a basis for someone's correct answer. Also, labeling it as "AI's best guess" also gives a comparison between what humans answer and what AIs answer. Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 15:56
  • 1
    @Yakk-AdamNevraumont if one wants AI's best guess, they can go to a resource that already provides that. It makes no sense to add a limited version of that to SO.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 15:59
  • I like this idea. Having an AI user who would answer questions would be a fine way of training a model. The model could be refined by using up/down votes and commenting on its answers. Users could allow or ban the AI account from providing answers.
    – Catriel
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 16:40
  • @KevinB Except, why not keep the eyeballs here? Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 17:03
  • The solution existing here would be half baked compared to a tool made for such use
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5, 2023 at 17:51
  • 3
    "It sometimes isn't wrong" Well isn't that great! Dude, that's not even close to being good enough.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jun 6, 2023 at 7:22
  • 2
    I would support an experiment to provide a ChatGPT-generated answer on the site as an option for the asker, but that doesn't mean it should be posted as an actual answer for future visitors to the question. When it works, it would probably help reduce the number of trivial and duplicate questions. (Flabbergastingly, that's apparently not what the company wants, probably because that would reduce advertising revenue; but it would help maintain the quality of the site, and reduce the need for manual administration.)
    – tripleee
    Commented Jun 13, 2023 at 6:13
-39

Reading through the answers and comments, I can't help but detect a lot of bias, seemingly out of fear for the unknown or potential competitor.

This line in the OP is telling:

in order to determine that the answer is actually bad has effectively swamped our volunteer-based quality curation infrastructure.

Why set out to determine it 'is actually bad' instead of good. In my experience, it's usually correct (because I ask the right questions). In the cases it's not, it's useful to discuss with ChatGPT where the mistake lies. With some frequency I ask it to reread its reply and whether it is sure that's correct.

Similar in many comments, where people clearly show bias without supporting or even convincing arguments. Comments like "it is stupid" and "it's a good joke generator". The main argument seems to be "it's not always correct". Yes, neither are all (or even most?) human answers, but that aside, if that's your main argument, what will you do in 6 months or 2 years?

Personally I think ChatGPT is hands down the most productive assistant / near-coworker I ever had (in 30+ years IT and coding) and anyone not adapting it ASAP to gain at least experience with it is contributing to their own demise.

Important to understand is that it's an assistant, a tool, not a substitute. AI won't replace developers; developers who use AI will replace developers. Pick a side that suits you and your family. Sticking your head in the sand isn't a fruitful approach to AI, embrace it, control it, use it to increase productivity.

Posting answers or questions written by ChatGPT straight to SO is like copying and pasting from another site, but banning questions and answers ChatGPT assisted in writing just seems wrong. It's almost like banning a spell/grammar checker.

I learned never to complain without offering alternatives. People posting answers should be held accountable for bad answers. That way they'll put in the extra effort to make sure the AI-assistant answer is useful to the one asking the question. Whether it's text, questions and answers, or code, everything an AI produces should be considered a draft. Perhaps a test section limited to certain topics, or show the ChatGPT-assisted answers (allow answerers to mark them as such) at the bottom of the answer list, collapsed and hidden till the reader opens them. Anything that doesn't involve throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

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    "seemingly out of fear for the unknown or potential competitor." Wrong. This bias is based on a understanding of how LLMs work, and what their limitations are.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 14:38
  • 13
    "Actually bad" vs "Actually good" doesn't matter. The same level of effort is required to validate it.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 14:39
  • 7
    "what will you do in 6 months or 2 years." We'll cross that bridge when we get to it.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 14:39
  • 28
    You're missing the point that GPT was causing a flood of low-effort generated copy-pasted content. There was no way to accurately moderate all of it. Your last paragraph assumes users are honest. They're not. They're just dumping AI-generated text on the site and seeing what sticks.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 14:41
  • 14
    Seems like you're missing the point here. We're not banning chatgpt due to fear of being replaced... banning it in that case would have no effect on the outcome anyway. Instead, it's banned for the reasons outlined in the question: the success rate is too low. Yes, you using it yourself can poke and prod chatgpt enough to end up at a valid answer, however, that doesn't work for generating long-term useful content, particularly when answerers use it as a fire and forget tool for farming reputation rather than for producing high quality content.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 14:44
  • 11
    "Important to understand is that it's an assistant, a tool, not a substitute." That's why it is banned as a substitute for manually writing answers, not as an assistant, a tool. This answers seems to be missing what the ban is about: People are still free to use ChatGPT themselves. As many (all?) of the positives mentioned here require interacting with ChatGPT, it is not suitable for a Q&A format where answers are fixed and discussion is intentionally kept to a minimum. Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 14:58
  • 3
    @Xartec Clearly the latter, however the former is a mixed bag. It's difficult to ban the one without also banning the other.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 15:05
  • 8
    Let me put it this way. Users who properly use chatgpt to assist creating their answer are creating answers that are indistinguishable from answers that aren't assisted by GPT at all. if they're indistinguishable we clearly can't do anything about them.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 15:08
  • 5
    If users need to be told how to use chatgpt to write their answers they're clearly using it for the wrong reasons. I don't think a guide would help, given the existing guidance we have for writing questions and answers is largely ignored anyway.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 15:16
  • 5
    I mean, you're missing the point, as i expected, ;) the correct use of chatgpt is as a research assistant or a last resort at getting ideas, not a code-writing service or debugging tool. It shouldn't be used to explain what code does or why it was written in the way it is without heavy work from the user in improving the output, given most of the time the output is full of useless or irrelevant information such as "how an if statement works".
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 15:23
  • 6
    @Xartec If someone treats ChatGPT as a draft and then improves on that draft manually their answer is not the output of ChatGPT rewording it and not covered by the ban. The point of treating any verbatim output of ChatGPT as banned is that one cannot efficiently tell the difference between "small rewrite" and "complete rewrite" (or supervised/unsupervised, or whatever you want to call responsible versus irresponsible use) since ChatGPT by its nature always rewrites. Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 15:26
  • 2
    @Xartec fair, however, it's still a solution that doesn't solve the problem at hand. (this ban, on the other hand, does.)
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 15:38
  • 5
    To put a counterpoint into context: You don't become an expert at programming by using autocomplete or an IDE. Those who contextualize this can do OK with AI-derived tools since they know that it's not a panacea. The problem is that around the world, there are a lot of terrible engineers that treat AI as the solution. This is why it has to be banned; a lot of people who copy-paste from this site don't get that they still have to validate what it is they're doing.
    – Makoto
    Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 15:56
  • 7
    @Xartec - ". In which case it's my opinion ..." - It's not our responsibility as a community to teach users how to effectively use ChatGPT as a tool. In fact, Stack Overflow is NOT a learning resource, or more specifically not a replacement for adequate learning from other resources on the user's part. For every "good" output you have been able to be generated with ChatGPT I can show you 30 outputs that appear right but were actually factually incorrect. They appeared to an individual with zero domain knowledge to be correct but in reality, were factually and technically incorrect. Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 17:38
  • 6
    @Xartec - Users already don't follow those guidelines. Given the amount of inaccuracy with regards to ChatGPT I don't believe it's worth the squeeze. Commented Sep 5, 2023 at 19:52
-40

A Solution?

I agree to most other answers, except the "but there is no solution" part. Also, I believe not all posters here understand that we're just at the beginning.

Hence, my proposal would be to attack, instead of defend.

Why not enable a feature that sends all questions to ChatGPT right after posting and display the result alongside the answer? It should be marked as the ChatGPT answer and users could opt to not display it.

  • This would immediately stop people from abusing ChatGPT to farm reputation. The similarity would be too obvious, at least for the case where the question is just copy-pasted. If ChatGPT users enhance the question to improve the response, they already added some value and would not be in rapid fire mode anymore.

  • It would give the benefit of the doubt that an AI answer might actually be valuable. By rating those answers the same way as rating human answers, we can see how they rank with others.

  • Humans who write answers can refer to it and agree or disagree, if that makes any sense. They can point out whether there is only a minor mistake in the AI answer or whether the answer is based on a misunderstanding or predominant misconception on the internet (as the source of information).

I think this solution would scale for some time to come, but I am not sure, how feasible that is. Will Stack Overflow be charged, or can Stack Overflow sell this to OpenAI as a marketing hack? I don't know.

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  • 22
    No. This has been suggested plenty of times already. Look at the other answers here as to why this can't work.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 17:07
  • would you care to point me at it, because I didn't see it.
    – Ingo
    Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 17:10
  • @Cerbrus, just found it on the next side, sorry for not being thorough in the first place. It seems indeed, that the solution could be difficult, but I am not entirely on your side. In the long run, ChatGPT will become less expensive and in the short term, it may wish to run this as advertisment the same way I can go there and ask questions to it.
    – Ingo
    Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 17:20
  • For the point with repeated questions yield different answers: I would assume that the different answer will be somewhat suffering from the same problem. Might be difficult to compare word by word, but might be good enough to discourage abuse.
    – Ingo
    Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 17:22
  • 21
    ChatGPT can offer completely different answers to the same question, including absolute contradictions of what it said mere seconds ago. The similarities between pairs of ChatGPT answers are structural in nature, not content based; there is no use in having a "reference answer" to spot other generated answers for the same question. Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 17:39
  • 8
    "… in the short term, it may wish to run this as advertisment the same way I can go there and ask questions to it." That would be a rather poor advertisement. ChatGPT isn’t made nor meant for the kind of questions SO is made for. Expecting experts to waste their time trying to curate a stream of technical nonsense isn’t a winning story… (This is in essence something this very meta-question already said - there is just no capacity to manually vet all the content that ChatGPT has generated, let alone could generate, for SO.) Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 17:46
  • 2
    gotcha, and to be honest, I didn't expect the answers would be 'contradicting' and that sounds like a general flaw to me. It would at least make sense, if ChatGPT would enhance itself based on the content it receives, but I was not able to observe any valuable learning, based on my feedback. Even in the most stupid way.
    – Ingo
    Commented Mar 6, 2023 at 16:50
  • 11
    @Ingo ChatGPT doesn't "remember" the conversations it has. As I said here "ChatGPT generates plausible text, consistent with its training data and the prompt, but it doesn't know what it's talking about, and it has no way of representing or evaluating the truth of its utterances. Yes, it can say true things, but it can also say complete nonsense, and it can't tell the difference". It's designed to manipulate syntax, not semantics. Stephen Wolfram gives a good outline of how it works in the first of his articles linked in my answer.
    – PM 2Ring
    Commented Mar 8, 2023 at 14:20
  • 1
    See also now the train wreck at meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/425162/…
    – tripleee
    Commented Jun 19, 2023 at 3:43

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