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I added a bounty to "draw more attention" to a question and answer(s), but instead it just attracted a bunch of downvotes.

Was there something wrong with this question? Are there any clarifications needed or improvements to be made? I've reviewed it again carefully and tried to make some edits, but I can't see anything obviously missing.

Link: Local variable 'result' might be referenced before assignment

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    unfortunately... by posting to meta you're further attracting more attention to it, and by complaining about downvotes as part of the question... you're likely to attract more of them, whether warranted or not.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 22 at 19:44
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    It's not complain about downvotes, just stated as fact. I am even happy to collect more downvotes, as long as they come with comments about what is unclear or could be improved in the question Nov 22 at 19:47
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    I think your question is fine, but disagree that the original answer didn't answer it. Both the original answer and the new one cover the same ground, and come to the conclusion that the operable word "might" in the warning is key.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 22 at 19:48
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    Please edit this question to clarify what you actually interested in - clearly asking for attention means more voting (up or down, and you seem to be fine with that). So it looks like the title of this post is unrelated to what you want answers/help with. It is probably also should be tagged with "specific question" if indeed you need help with that question. Nov 22 at 19:50
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    The warning is there to tell you that the logic that generates warnings found a possible problem. that doesn't mean it is a problem, it means it might be a problem. You could probably write the code in such a way that it is more clear to that logic that it isn't a problem, but if your code is already safeguarding against it... Both answers already explain effectively the same conclusion you came to when you asked: You've coded around the warning, preventing what the warning was meant to protect against.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 22 at 19:52
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    Put another way, it's a false positive, but one you could potentially change your code such that the warning doesn't happen. But your question isn't asking for that
    – Kevin B
    Nov 22 at 19:56
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    @KevinB If it's a false positive (i.e. the warning is bogus) then that's a valid answer, but I don't think that's what the current answers are claiming at all Nov 22 at 20:08
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    @cafce25 Because it misreads the question and is talking about a different situation entirely. Nov 22 at 20:15
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    It still fails to explain how that other hypothetical example is relevant. Nov 22 at 20:22
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    “Was there something wrong with this question?” - At least 4 users did indeed find something lacking with the question. I find the answers you’re receiving are actually answering your question. “If fails to explain …” - If the finally clause executes a return, break or continue statement, the saved exception is discarded seems crystal clear to me. Nov 22 at 20:38
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    @nooboverflow meta (and especially comments) is not the place to provide additional information to the question on main site. Please try to keep comments on-topic: if this meta question need some sort of improvment/clarification. If you have clarifications to either main or meta questions pleas edit the corresponding question instead of adding comments. Nov 22 at 20:51
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    "as long as they come with comments" But voting does not have to involve comments, so you are just being obstinately contrary to site conventions.
    – philipxy
    Nov 23 at 9:00
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    Three recent answers were deleted, likely due to the incoming downvotes. Nov 23 at 15:31
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    Use of an image is borderline. I think it is OK in this case (all the text is provided), but readers in a hurry may overlook that the text is actually provided. The image is also quite visually dominant. The busy readers are used to the text never ever (a typical sign of minimum-effort users) being provided (not even after several pretty pleases in comments). Thus an image of code may provoke an instinctive downvote and stop reading altogether. The image could be de-emphasised by moving it to the end, as supporting material. Nov 23 at 15:49
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    @philipxy Voting does not have to involve comments, and neither should it be compulsory, but it seems to be fairly commonplace on stack exchange for users to add some explanation when voting down. It is helpful when a downvoter leaves a courtesy comment, so that the author can edit if they choose. Nov 23 at 18:02

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