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I came across How to test private members and methods of classes? which is tagged . It was closed about 4 years ago as a duplicate of How do I test a class that has private methods, fields or inner classes? which is tagged . These are not the same and the techniques suggested are very different (for example, most of the C++ examples involve the preprocessor.) This is a good, useful question that I would like to see continue to evolve with new ideas.

How do I go about getting the attention of those who can fix this?

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    Closed by a moderator, referencing a completely different question. Interesting decision.. Nov 17 at 13:19
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    @MichaelSzczesny Calling them "completely different question(s)" is also an "Interesting decision". They are the same question with the same basic answer "you don't need to test private methods". They only differ in the explanation how to do that anyway.
    – Tom
    Nov 17 at 13:21
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    @Tom - I can see that. My point of view is: Finding the link to the java question, while googling for a c++ solution. Nov 17 at 13:27
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    Baum mit Augen wasn't a moderator at the time, for what it's worth, @MichaelSzczesny . They were el cited in 2019.
    – Larnu
    Nov 17 at 13:28
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    Most of the answers there seem to assume that it's my question, which it's not. It's just a question I'm interested in. One of the answers linked suggested "Create a question on Meta Stack Overflow (MSO) with the tags discussion, reopen-closed, and specific-question". I guess that's what I was trying to do. Nov 17 at 13:29
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    "One of the answers linked suggested "Create a question on Meta Stack Overflow (MSO) with the tags discussion, reopen-closed, and specific-question"" .... you mean the answer which said "and you've sufficiently edited and/or explained why this is incorrect and it cannot get enough reopen votes" ... accidentally missed that part, I guess?
    – Tom
    Nov 17 at 13:31
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    "It's not my question, so I can't edit it" this is not correct, everyone can edit posts which aren't locked. And this question isn't locked.
    – Tom
    Nov 17 at 13:37
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    Closing a highly-voted C++ question as a dupe of a Java question is bad. Period.
    – leonheess
    Nov 17 at 13:40
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    @leonheess No one is arguing against reopening that question, so whats the point of your remark?
    – Tom
    Nov 17 at 13:46
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    Thanks! Sorry if I didn't follow protocol very well. Nov 17 at 14:14
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    @EJoshuaS-StandwithUkraine this marked as "specific question" - so presumably OP should know that editing the question to clarify why it is not duplicate is the right approach (also based on comments OP does not even know they can edit at all)... I don't think this meta question should be closed as duplicate. Nov 17 at 17:12
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    @AlexeiLevenkov Perhaps you'd like to have a go at answering it then? Because as it is, the answers to the proposed duplicate answer this question as well, which is the definition of a duplicate. So if it shouldn't be closed as a duplicate, should we just copy an answer from that other question here? Nov 17 at 19:25
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    When I closed this, the target had no language tag at all. It was a language agnostic question about how to unit test private method, and the answers along the line of "you don't" and "it's a sign for bad code" do apply accordingly. Granted, the answer explaining how to do it anyway in Java does not. Probably would not close that today, unless I found a better target.
    – Baum mit Augen Mod
    Nov 17 at 22:05
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    @BaummitAugen The accepted answer on the target only had "java" added in 2017 by someone other than OP. Wouldn't these changes warrant rollbacks because they change the intent of the question and the answer(s)?
    – TylerH
    Nov 18 at 17:39
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    "Closing a highly-voted C++ question as a dupe of a Java question is bad. Period." Not if the question doesn't actually have anything to do with either language. This one doesn't appear to. The people asking are not necessarily in the best position to make this determination. Because the problem specification is so nonsensical, it shouldn't have been asked or answered in a Java-specific way in the first place. But such is our legacy. Nov 18 at 22:45

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