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I recently received a warning that I was close to losing the ability to ask questions on SO some time after a particular question received a large amount of negative score (-6) and was deleted for "detail/clarity" reasons.

I've read the guide for this sort of question ban (among quite a few others), but I would like more advice as to how some questions can be improved at all. I would like to improve my deleted questions (the noted one was particularly bad), but the question topic itself is problematic.

I was informed in a comment that I should generally only post images when they greatly simplify the explanation of my problem, but I took this as a general "for the future" piece of advice and didn't change the question itself.

Thanks to the comments on this question, I'm now aware that this is a serious issue and wish to convert the image to text.

However, I struggle to improve that question or my others any further, as, aside from an off-topic question, the questions were fundamentally about specific topics which apparently just aren't popular.

For instance, one of them was about how a product's advertised Bluetooth feature could be physically possible, and it didn't get any attention. Others are about similarly specific items (saving data in text write buffers on receipt of a Ctrl + C in Python). My latest question featured several flawed assumptions (such as that C++ is a superset of C, which I'd been told by two different college professors), leading to a rather bad question even once other issues are fixed.

What should I do to improve a question's topic if it's either simply so specific that no one seems able to answer it or if the concepts upon which it was asked were invalid?

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    How does the warning not tell you what to do? PS The warning is about more than that post.
    – philipxy
    Nov 15 at 2:37
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    'I took this as a general "for the future"' No sound reason for that. 'did not come with any comments' But there is downvote arrow mouseover text. Quote what is relevant from elsewhere in your post. What is the result of your research?--How are you unable to determine the C & C++ specified behaviours or 'difference? But anyway how is one language even relevant to the other? "under the impression that C++ is a superset of C" No research. PS Deleted posts count more towards limits than non-deleted posts. PS Images of text are bad. Photos of images of text are really bad.
    – philipxy
    Nov 15 at 2:38
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    The way your question here is phrased, you seem to be more concerned about your fears and anxieties, focusing on them. Don't do that. Focus instead on improving the quality of your question - all that anxious energy and emotional drive-to-worry can be put to good use in learning good practice. Nov 15 at 2:44
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    Also, since you didn't delete the question yourself, you can't undelete it all by yourself. You'll have to ask for it to be undeleted on Meta SO linked above.
    – gparyani
    Nov 15 at 3:28
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    In general, advice given on a question is an explicit request to alter the question to address the issue. Negative vote are some times give and retracted when advice is acted upon by OP. You said 'I took this as a general "for the future"'. I have not voted on any of your questions, but I have downvoted image only code with note "replace image with text" (or similar) then upvoted when the OP does so. Nov 15 at 13:10
  • Thank you all, I have addressed your comments and flagged this question for migration. Nov 15 at 13:33
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    I do have to wonder why you never appeared to have followed the suggestions given to you in comments, in particular, converting the image of code into code-formatted text. Nov 15 at 14:45
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    Regarding the C vs C++ thing, any decent tag on SO has tag usage guidance. If you hover the mouse over either tag, it will explain briefly what the tag is for. Both of these tags tell you not to combine them unless you have specific reasons. If you click on a tag and then "learn more", you land in the "tag wiki" where the tag posting rules should be explained more in detail. Using the wrong tags isn't usually a reason for having a question closed, but it might piss off people needlessly and attract down votes.
    – Lundin
    Nov 15 at 15:26
  • @HovercraftFullOfEels I was unsure if editing the question would just attract more negative attention by updating it, since there were other issues with my question. That was one of the reasons for this post - did that get lost in editing? Nov 15 at 15:29
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    It's a moot point now, but at the time between when you asked the question and it was deleted, addressing any and all serious concerns over question quality would likely result in more positive and less negative attention to the question. Nov 15 at 15:30
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    Also, that particular question looks to be an updated version of a previous question, since the title stated, "(updated question)" (title text which was correctly removed by another user's edit), one that I'm guessing was poorly received and one that you possibly deleted. If so, then that action might increase your risk of entering a question ban, since now you would have two poorly received and deleted question. Better, for question ban avoidance purposes, would be to fix the original question as best possible. Nov 15 at 15:32
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    I had asked a somewhat similar question before, but it was Arduino-specific. This was a new example of a mechanism I not only didn't understand, but was told was impossible and wanted to see how this one worked. Nov 15 at 15:40
  • I have edited the linked question to be more clear and removed the code image. I still feel somewhat bad about the misunderstandings involved in my original statements, but a lot of them were directly from my programming classes, including that C++ is fancier C. I've removed all of those, although I'm still not sure what to do about the tags. Nov 15 at 22:28
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    When you are looking to improve question linked from the meta the bar is really high. Wording like "some said X" without links to reputable source (product/language reference is ideal) will not work, anything that you can try yourself ("Does a similar behavior also exist in C++") should be done and results added to the question (if it is still relevant to the one question that is being asked). Ideally you work out MRE that does not need any extra files (all those .h files are plain text and you can cut and paste till you get working code with just enough lines that show behavior). Nov 15 at 22:52
  • Still 3 question marks in that post. And a vague title that isn't one of their questions. Also 2 are yes or no questions--do you want yes or no as answer? Ask 1 specific researched non-duplicate question. There still seems to be no reason why you mention C or give C code. "similar" means nothing in particular & adding it to a prior description even with an example is vaguer, not clearer. What is stopping you from seeing yourself from the includes? PS Standard #include files are implementation-specific & moreover including one needn't include anything--compiled code must just act right.
    – philipxy
    Nov 16 at 0:09

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