89

The purpose of this thread was to collect questions for the questionnaire. The questionnaire is now live, and you may find it here.


Stack Overflow is scheduled for an election next week, 2022-11-07. In connection with that, we will be holding a Q&A with the candidates. This will be an opportunity for members of the community to pose questions to the candidates on the topic of moderation. Participation is completely voluntary.

Here’s how it’ll work:

  • Until the nomination phase, (so, until 2022-11-07 at 20:00:00Z UTC, or 4:00 pm EDT on the same day, give or take time to arrive for closure), this question will be open to collect potential questions from the users of the site. Post answers to this question containing any questions you would like to ask the candidates. Please only post one question per answer.

  • If your question contains a link, please use the syntax of [text](link), as that will make it easier for transcribing for the finished questionnaire.

  • This is a perfect opportunity to voice questions that are specific to your community and issues that you are running into currently.

  • We, the Community Team, will be providing a small selection of generic questions. The following two questions are guaranteed to be included:

    • How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?
    • How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc. a question that you feel shouldn’t have been?
  • The community team may also include the following three questions if the community doesn’t supply enough questions.

    • In your opinion, what do moderators do?
    • A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?
    • In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?
  • At the start of the nomination phase, the Community Team will select up to 8 of the top voted questions submitted by the community provided in this thread, to use in addition to the aforementioned 2 guaranteed questions. We reserve some editorial control in the selection of the questions and may opt not to select a question that is tangential or irrelevant to moderation or the election. We exclude any suggested questions that are negatively scored.

    • We will post the final questionnaire on the Election page. Candidates will have the option to fill out the questionnaire, and their answers will appear beneath their intro statements.
    • This is not the only option that users have for gathering information on candidates. As a community, you are still free to, for example, hold a live chat session with your candidates to ask further questions, or perhaps clarifications from what is provided in the Q&A.

If you have any questions or feedback about this process, feel free to post as a comment here.

10
  • 67
    All the best to the future candidates. Oct 31 at 15:45
  • 8
    Is there a reason why these questions need to be changed from scratch every year? Can't we just grab the previous year's set of questions as a draft and have the community propose changes to it, if needed? Which shouldn't be necessary unless something about SO has radically changed in the past year, or in case someone comes up with a brilliant new question which nobody asked before in the past 10 years of elections.
    – Lundin
    Nov 2 at 15:17
  • 12
    Community elections represent a fun event in which users of all technical levels can engage. Elections can be a breath of fresh air to users that may be becoming jaded by regular routines. I welcome opportunities for users to think creatively (every year). I personally would not like to see historical questions banked up and rolled out every cycle -- that would feel boring and predictable to me. Something in me actually doesn't like how some of the questions below are copy-pastes from previous elections -- this allows prior candidates to paste their old responses ...not fun for readers. Nov 2 at 20:12
  • @Sayse I'm not sure what you mean. 4 out of the 5 eligible candidates from the last election are currently moderators, so the candidates this year will definitely be substantially different.
    – cigien
    Nov 4 at 7:43
  • 1
    @Sayse There were only 6 candidates last year. 2 were immediately appointed and the 2nd and 3rd were called up later. I don't think the problem is giving anyone unfair advantages, but rather finding (qualified) candidates in the first place. See meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/412695/…
    – Lundin
    Nov 4 at 9:23
  • @cigien There were actually 6 but one got disqualified. Which I assume is water under the bridge by now, so they can probably apply again.
    – Lundin
    Nov 4 at 9:25
  • 1
    @mickmackusa And it also means that all great questions people came up with during those past 10+ years are dismissed. I'm sure that there were lots of brilliant ones over the years, which will not get asked again unless someone remembers to dig them up and add them to this thread. Also, wise previous candidates who are running again might want to reconsider the answers given previously, since those answers didn't get them elected after all.
    – Lundin
    Nov 4 at 9:32
  • I have a question. For the CMs, not the candidates, so I'll leave it here instead of as an answer. SO currently has 25 moderators and it's common knowledge that the amount of work it takes to moderate SO is a lot. All previous elections were for at least 2 positions. The 2021 election was for 3 positions with a 4th being called up to meet additional demand. Why is the current election for only a single position? The whole idea behind having so many elections is you don't have to train 4 people at the same time, but a single one seems too low.
    – Mast
    Nov 5 at 10:00
  • 2
  • @cigien so basically you're saying I can't cut and paste. I'm taking this personally. :D Nov 6 at 1:01

17 Answers 17

62

Too often, comparing the metrics on the competing moderator candidate cards offers very little differentiation and total candidate reputation is a suboptimal/obtuse metric to break ties.

Do you have any particular philosophies on moderation/curation that will set you apart from the other candidates?

Please be compelling with your unique stance(s) so that voters are less likely to fallback to sorting candidates by reputation.

1
  • 34
    This is a good point, but also, if you want people to read it, put it in your introduction, not way down in the questionnaire.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Nov 1 at 0:31
57

Sometimes users with high reputation on Stack Overflow grow accustomed to their everyday privileges and lose perspective of the site experience for less-privileged users. This may present as being insensitive to the struggles / pain points of less veteran users.

Are you active on other Stack Exchange sites as a relatively low-reputation user? If so, how would that activity color the way that you will treat users/content if elected as a moderator on Stack Overflow?

2
  • 10
    That's a brilliant question! Wish I could give it a bounty!
    – Nike
    Nov 1 at 3:18
  • Well I can relate to this, but being a veteran on one site means that you quickly gain rep on other sites too, since the site culture isn't that much different across the network. So being a low rep user isn't exactly the same as being a beginner. Personally, I kind of think that having no privileges is bliss - you'd go: "Oh this is a such a crap question but I don't have to close/edit/salvage it because I don't have the privileges for it anyway. Let someone else deal with the crap while I go do something funnier instead."
    – Lundin
    Nov 2 at 15:26
55

As a regular user, your close and delete votes are non-binding, and become effective only when enough other users agree with you. This ensures more fairness and reduces the chance of making mistakes.

As a moderator, your close and delete votes are now immediately binding, but your perception of what is close- and delete-worthy likely is the same as before. If you are elected, will your voting patterns change in consideration of this, and why?

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  • 13
    Also, your delete votes cannot be undone, except by another diamond.
    – Machavity Mod
    Nov 2 at 16:11
  • 3
    I would add to this: "Every subject-matter comment, answer, or question you post will display your diamond-mod status. That makes your posts appear especially authoritative. But your subject-matter understanding likely is the same as before. If you are elected, will your posting patterns change in consideration of this, and why?"
    – O. Jones
    Nov 4 at 10:42
  • For future elections, I would recommend adjusting the opening of this post; regular users don't really have their close/delete votes "peer reviewed". That suggests other users are looking at the votes you cast and determining whether they are right. Overwhelmingly, it's actually just a case of needing a plurality of other users to agree with the decision you made. Someone disagreeing with my close vote cannot really dispute it or cancel it, which a peer reviewer in, e.g. an academic journal would be able to do... they can only disagree w/ the decision and abstain from also VTCing.
    – TylerH
    Nov 8 at 21:19
  • @TylerH thank you for this suggestion, do you have an alternative wording in mind that better fits the intent of the post? Or just remove that sentence altogether?
    – blackgreen
    Nov 8 at 23:18
  • 1
    I would just say "As a regular user, your close and delete votes are non-binding, and become effective only when enough other users agree with you."
    – TylerH
    Nov 9 at 13:52
46

As a regular Stack Overflow user who is running for moderator, you probably do your fair share of moderation work on the website. What is one issue that you encounter frequently that you think needs more moderator attention but, for whatever reason, doesn't and how will you approach this issue when you become a moderator?

3
  • 1
    Good question; I wonder how many candidates will give the right answer (closing questions)
    – TylerH
    Nov 1 at 14:15
  • 2
    Not sure if I'm misreading. Should "for whatever reason, doesn't and how will you" be "for whatever reason, doesn't get it, and how will you"?
    – starball
    Nov 4 at 3:19
  • @david-fong Technically, "doesn't" refers to the whole phrase "that you encounter frequently that needs more moderator attention". The sentence could be simplified by removing "that you encounter frequently", since it is implied (IMO) by "that needs more moderator attention", as issues that need more moderator attention presumably are encountered frequently (enough). Nov 4 at 16:55
36

Stack Overflow moderation is a nontrivial time investment due to its scale.

Do you think cleaning up Stack Overflow is an appealing way to spend your free time?

If so, why? If not, what makes you want to be a moderator anyway?

4
  • 7
    To be clear, does this mean you think 30 minutes a day is non-trivial? Or are you suggesting the moderator candidates be prepared to spend more time each day performing mod duties?
    – TylerH
    Nov 1 at 14:03
  • 11
    @TylerH while it's not difficult to spend more than 30 minutes a day moderating (and I surely have many times, as have others), I think 30 minutes a day is in fact non-trivial for a volunteer position like this, and I wouldn't want to raise that baseline expectation for a few reasons, including sustainability and burnout.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Nov 1 at 16:56
  • 5
    Thanks; FWIW I agree a sustained/consistent effort of 30min/day is not exactly trivial, but I also can see folks easily saying "wait, 30 minutes is nothing, what amount of time is he expecting?!"
    – TylerH
    Nov 1 at 19:38
  • 6
    This is also why we need to reduce the amount of busy-work or outsource it to user moderators. Diamond mods are just volunteers too and their time is best spent dealing with the most serious matters, rather than cleaning up "no longer needed" comments.
    – Lundin
    Nov 2 at 15:31
32

What is the non-diamond moderation activity you think matters the most? Would you still engage in it the same if you are elected or do you expect your priorities to shift?

1
  • Vote like the future of your site depends on it. Never stop voting.
    – Mast
    Nov 5 at 9:42
31

On Stack Overflow, you're going to get a decent number of users who believe that their rights are being violated by a moderation act. This could vary from a downvote to having their content or even account deleted.

In light of a lot of the perceptions around communication online - mostly in the United States and the notion of free speech - how would you go about handling, guiding, educating or correcting a user who has this conception? Do you believe that they have a valid point, or do you believe otherwise?

5
  • 27
  • 1
    @NickstandswithUkraine are you saying that the users complaining about downvotes should be shown the door, or people who believe that they have free speech to criticize them should be shown the door?
    – Nike
    Nov 1 at 3:17
  • 10
    @Nike: That's what makes this question a suitable one to ask a candidate moderator. There are a lot of opinions on this and a lot of people truly believe that the Internet at large is a bastion of free speech, without really...understanding...what that implies. So, should this question be chosen, you can vote for the candidate whose answer resonates best with your personal beliefs!
    – Makoto
    Nov 1 at 7:06
  • 1
    This question comes across to me as soapboxing about "those users" and the interaction of their putative political beliefs with site conduct. Nov 4 at 5:40
  • 4
    @KarlKnechtel: It's really more about a different situation that I see, since I leave my tower on at home, and I happen to have a tab open to Meta Stack Exchange. A lot of the deleted posts rant about this very thing, and they are largely dealt with by the community at large. Suppose then that a rant like this was happening in real time, and a moderator was going to deal with it. The easiest thing to do would be to just delete the post, but how does that guide and inform someone on appropriate usage of the site?
    – Makoto
    Nov 4 at 16:01
30

I'm gonna repost my question from last year:


Given that not everyone holds Meta discussions in the same regard, what do you base your moderation policy on when handling flags where the accused behavior isn't spelled out explicitly in the site rules?

And what if a flagger links to a Meta discussion in their flag where you don't agree with the outcome of that discussion?

Or, in short: how do you view the "unwritten" rules that are determined on Meta, and how do those influence your behavior, if at all?

28

A question from Code Golf's 2022 Question Collection Q&A proposed by @pxeger:

You've taken what you feel is a reasonable moderation action, but another user brings up an analogous situation in the past where an opposite action was taken, which was also reasonable at the time. How would you react to this user's complaint?

1
  • 2
    spicy. Are you sure you're not supposed to be called DialBurn?
    – starball
    Nov 4 at 3:21
25

There is a considerable backlog of custom moderator flags on Stack Overflow reporting plagiarism. Do you think plagiarism is a problem on Stack Overflow? How will you handle a flag reporting a plagiarized post for a user with dozens or hundreds of posts?

3
  • 6
    To further substantiate the backlog comment, apparently, The current size of the moderator flag queue is approximately 4000. Oct 31 at 17:28
  • 11
    I worry that this question either has an obviously correct answer that everyone will give for the first part, and/or that the second part is basically asking "do you know how Stack Overflow moderators handle plagiarism flags?"
    – Ryan M Mod
    Nov 1 at 1:26
  • 2
    @RyanM That’s a fair criticism. Although, if they don’t give the “right” answer, I’m not sure I want to vote for them. Nov 1 at 1:28
15

Question number 8 from last year's election (proposed by Jean-François Fabre) since I'm sure mods deal with this all the time:

Some actions (moderator messages, including suspension) are anonymous, so users cannot get back at the moderator who send the warning/sanction. Some others leave "breadcrumbs" (a few examples: deleting a NAA post, deleting a duplicate answer with a comment, nuking a potential spam post without applying the spam penalty, commenting to defuse a toxic comment thread instead of sending private messages...). Those actions can lead to users getting back at you personally with revenge downvotes for instance. If you process a lot of flags, you're not going to be able to make a relation with the serial downvoting. How would you handle such attacks if you'd decide to handle it? Would you rather not delete a post by fear of revenge / meta post that you'd possibly have to answer to (and possibly get a lot of downvotes, because, hey, this is meta)?

12

A post taken from last year's moderator election (2021) from @Machavity:

A question is asked in a fairly active tag about which you have no firsthand knowledge. A gold badge holder marks it duplicate and another comes along behind them and reopens it and answers it. The first user raises a moderator flag, complaining that the new answer is similar to (or the same as) those found in the duplicate. They want the question closed again. In the meantime, both people have rallied their friends/fellow users and have closed and reopened the question twice more, prompting more flags in both directions. How would you handle this?

6

As a moderator you walk into a chat room and find yourself in a heated debate about some curation policy for a post/group of posts. It becomes evident the current guidance in the Help, Meta, the Über-Meta or even (private) moderation guidance is lacking.

You do have a strong opinion and have no trouble expressing that opinion in lengthy monologues. Once done, there would be little room left for maneuvering or discussion as everything would be said. So you would have basically set the policy right there and then.

How do you proceed?

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  • 11
    How do they proceed?! Didn't they just set the policy there and then...? (Like in the second to last sentence.)
    – bad_coder
    Oct 31 at 18:22
  • 3
    @bad_coder well, they might, but did they?
    – rene
    Oct 31 at 18:23
  • 17
    I'm having a bit of trouble parsing what you're saying in the second paragraph. "Once done there is little room left for manouvering or discussion as everything is said. So you basically set the policy right there an then." Everything about what is said? Is this a question about "should moderators set policy in this manner"? Is this about how people perceive what a moderator says in chat as creating policy where there is none? Something else? Oct 31 at 18:26
  • 1
    rule with an iron fist
    – Kevin B
    Oct 31 at 18:27
  • 2
    @HenryEcker both interpretations are valid.
    – rene
    Oct 31 at 18:27
  • 16
    This question starts a lot like "A moderator walks into a bar" joke, and I've got to say, I need to see more of those.
    – Andy Mod
    Oct 31 at 21:01
  • 18
    I think this question is interesting but you should make it clearer what it's actually asking. I don't understand what the "How do you proceed?" at the end means. The first two paragraphs already describe the reader's actions as a moderator. What does "proceed" refer to?
    – blackgreen
    Oct 31 at 21:08
  • 5
    @Andy a moderator walks into a bar. It hurts.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 1 at 10:12
  • 1
    Would changing the sentence in the second paragraph to the following (emphasizing changed parts) be more clear in what you mean? "Once done, there would be little room left for maneuvering or discussion as everything would be said. So you would have basically set the policy right there and then." The changes are trying to imply that they haven't taken that action yet but can do so. Nov 1 at 11:48
  • 1
    Not sure how they are expected to answer this question... like bad_coder it sounds from your second paragraph like you've answered the question already. When a moderator says 'this is the way its gonna go', it's very difficult for a non-moderator to debate beyond that point... especially if the moderator threatens chat suspension or room deletion. So I think this is missing an action by the person the candidate would be talking to, in between the second paragraph and your final sentence/question.
    – TylerH
    Nov 1 at 14:06
  • 10
    @Andy A moderator walks into a bar, paints over the graffiti in the bathroom, throws out a bar patron for undisclosed self-promotion and two others for not attributing their sources.
    – Michael
    Nov 1 at 17:56
  • @AbdulAzizBarkat I have taken that suggestion and edit it in. I think that should be it. If a candidate can't proceed from here, well ... I dunno.
    – rene
    Nov 1 at 18:04
  • 5
    Let me add that the Python room doesn't get to set the community standards. So when a mod settles a debate there, that isn't the end of the story.
    – rene
    Nov 1 at 18:06
  • 6
    @Andy A moderator walks into a bar, and promptly closes it as a duplicate.
    – Cerbrus
    Nov 4 at 8:20
  • 2
    "Once done, there would be little room left for maneuvering or discussion as everything would be said." No one who thinks that could be the case should be a moderator or in any position of authority over others.
    – jpmc26
    Nov 5 at 19:17
2

As everybody has an ideal or at least an idea of what makes a good moderator.

What qualities, if any, do you think needs a moderator the most? And did an event occur, where you met or missed these qualities that have manifested your idea or even made you run for moderator? If yes, how would you handle this situation differently and why?

Note: Don't call someone out on this, just describe the important details of this situation.

-9

A decent on-topic question elicits some decent on-topic answers, but someone comments on an answer that a specific detail of the topic is negative (discriminatory or otherwise unfair to some). Another user replies that indeed it is their comment that is negative (-ophobic, -ist, anti-). The accusatory comment exchange then proceeds from there, never actually strictly wandering off-topic for the site, though there are a few injections about the posters' respective posting histories thrown in.

At what point do you step in? And, as a moderator, what position do you think you should try and take?

18
  • 2
    This question is based on a situation I've actually run into as a moderator.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 8:45
  • 5
    I guess you are referring to Expatriates.SE, but how would that be applicable to SO? Is there any hypothetical case in which the specific detail cannot just be edited out (and the comment chain deleted)? I don't see any reason why something sparking such a discussion would have any place in a post on a technical site like SO. Nov 1 at 9:22
  • @JeanneDark, It really depends on the topic, and what point was brought up. Obviously this question should remain generic. But there have been accusations of bias on this site before, and indeed some of the most iconic meta posts on this site deal with that. There is a reason why those elected have to agree to the Moderators Agreement. Even an apparently cold strictly technical site like Stack Overflow has had to handle these kind of issues.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 9:28
  • Can you link to some of those examples to show that this is a problem that a moderator could face on SO in practice and not solve trivially by editing the post and deleting the comments in question (you don't even need to be a mod to edit, and enough flags by regular users can also remove comments)? Nov 1 at 9:41
  • @JeanneDark, I'd prefer to link to the Meta discussions that have resulted as many will have links to actual questions. First though, StackOverflow's blog. Ex. 1, Ex. 2.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 9:56
  • @JeanneDark, And ofcourse the iconic Why is StackOverflow so negative of late?. Those were spawned by questions about random number generators, React components, and game development.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 9:58
  • 2
    Thanks, although I don't really see how they cover the case you describe in your answer "a specific detail of the topic is socio-politically negative" and how this is not already covered in the rules and/or trivial to handle for even non-moderators. Maybe I just have hard time picturing a case in which such a specific detail could be an integral part of an SO post that's suitable for the site. Is something like this perhaps related to what you mean (although still quite a stretch). Nov 1 at 10:11
  • @JeanneDark "...how this is not already covered in the rules and/or trivial to handle for even non-moderators." Yeah, some things are black-and-white. A moderator often can just act off of default obvious judgement, and that's the end of it. But many of the questions here, including my attempt (hopefully), are a bit more broad and/or trying to actually elicit an answer from a potential candidate. "Sensitive topics that spawn from technical questions have to be dealt with. How would you deal with them?" - That sort of thing.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 10:25
  • @JeanneDark, Don't know how that one slipped pass my Meta radar. I'd prefer to stay away from any specific situation here though. These are hypothetical questions, and I don't want the discussion to turn away from that. In the specific situation I referred to, I'm not suggesting it was handled correctly or incorrectly. Only that it gives us an idea on how a potential moderator might approach a situation. For you, tidying up the comments and/or deleting the chain seems straightforward. Fine. But it's not always that simple and each candidate brings with them their own perspective.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 10:36
  • 3
    Can you perhaps use more... comprehensible wording? I have no idea what "socio-politically negative" means (I assume it means more than "discriminatory or otherwise unfair to some", since otherwise you could have just written that instead). Nov 1 at 11:27
  • @MisterMiyagi, Fair point. Removed that wording.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 11:34
  • Wording aside, I am uncomfortable with this question. It seems to obviously refer to some incident without disclosing which so it feels very much like baiting for judgement on that incident. Yet there isn't enough information to actually grasp the situation. So candidates will effectively have to invent a situation and focus on communicating that (to avoid misunderstandings), and still wonder just who they have actually condemned implicitly. Nov 1 at 12:10
  • 2
    @MisterMiyagi - Actually it's referring many many incidents that have occurred on StackOverflow over the years. But I am curious. What other information do you think would be enough to not lead a potential candidate to an answer that might now be their own? Several of these questions, including this one, are left with few or no exact details, and that's on purpose. I'd like to stick to that pattern. It's a pattern I agree with.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 12:16
  • 10
    "The accusatory comment exchange then proceeds from there, never actually strictly wandering off-topic for the site" That's incorrect; as soon as it starts, it's off-topic for the site. Maybe the initial comment could be construed as OK since it's recommending an improvement to an answer, but certainly an exchange of any length (and in the tone you're suggesting) should be deleted or at least migrated to chat. Two users arguing about what constitutes hateful language is never relevant to an on-topic Q or A on Stack Overflow.
    – TylerH
    Nov 1 at 14:10
  • 3
    @TylerH, "Two users arguing about what constitutes hateful language is never relevant to an on-topic Q or A on Stack Overflow" Couldn't agree more with this statement. And my own meta posts support that sentiment completely. But it has come up. And that possibility is still lingering around. Moderators have literally resigned over this kind of stuff. Fortunately these very exceptional circumstances are rare. But a moderator might have to deal with this situation. How they would, I believe, is a fair question.
    – ouflak
    Nov 1 at 15:03
-13

Why do you want to be a moderator?

16
  • 21
    Power! ... and shiny buttons to click.
    – rene
    Oct 31 at 18:00
  • 13
    I just want the shiny badge next to my name for my resume
    – Kevin B
    Oct 31 at 18:03
  • 40
    Just as a reminder: delete votes are not "super downvotes". This is clearly an answer to this question and a valid proposal (even if it is one that many disagree with). Oct 31 at 18:16
  • 8
    For the money ofc Nov 1 at 9:36
  • 4
    So I can see when people were last active to an actually useful level of detail again.
    – TylerH
    Nov 1 at 14:11
  • 1
    @TylerH I guess "I improved tools" is a valid reason to wanting to become a mod. Keep chasing your d̶e̶l̶u̶s̶i̶o̶n̶ dream. :P
    – VLAZ
    Nov 1 at 14:15
  • 8
    This clearly did not sit well with folks lol. I like it though; I feel like it's valuable to have a direct answer from the candidate regarding why they're wanting to be a moderator. I do understand though that this may be reflected in other areas already.
    – zcoop98
    Nov 1 at 15:35
  • 2
  • 7
    @zcoop98 the election page states "Nominees are required to construct a small introduction to describe why they might make a good community moderator" — I believe this directly implies addressing why you want to be a mod, so this candidate question appears rather redundant
    – blackgreen
    Nov 1 at 20:12
  • 3
    .... I didn't realise girls, leather and machismo were perks of being a mod... Nov 2 at 11:46
  • @JourneymanGeek maybe it's just on SO, then. I suggest you petition SE to provide the same perks to all communities. Otherwise it doesn't seem quite equal to me.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 2 at 11:48
  • 4
    This is very important question any future moderator should cover at least a bit in their application. Motivation is extremely important. Nov 4 at 8:33
  • 1
    @DalijaPrasnikar it is so important that it's already covered by the requirements for writing the nomination. Instead, by leaving this post up next to all others, we are effectively implying that it is optional, — otherwise there would be no need for the community to explicitly vote this into the questionnaire. In fact, it is actively detrimental in that this post visible and negatively scored might even make someone think that the community isn't interested in knowing the motivations.
    – blackgreen
    Nov 4 at 22:41
  • @blackgreen if a candidate took this downvoted question as a sign that they shouldn't explain why they want to be a moderator, then that's a great indication they're not mod material. We don't need to protect candidates from incorrect interpretations. Let them make blatant mistakes, it'll show in the votes.
    – Cerbrus
    Nov 7 at 9:49
-16

The Election page says that you need to dedicate at least 30 minutes daily for moderation duty on Stack Overflow. What do you normally do that you're willing to give up 30+ minutes of to become a moderator?

4
  • 23
    I suspect the answer would be exceptionally boring for candidates - they'd be giving up 30+ minutes of moderating SO in order to spend 30+ minutes of moderating SO. As in, they'd not be doing anything really "new" with their time. Plenty of people spend more than 30 minutes a day curating the site anyway. Diamond mods just have more tools to do it. And would tackle some things that normal users won't or can't (e.g., plagiarism, spam, fake accounts). Although some users already do this, as well. Dharman did before becoming a mod, for example.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 2 at 14:33
  • eh, i think a question like this could let a candidate elaborate on what they currently do and how they think having mod tools will change their interactions here.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 2 at 14:42
  • 9
    I spend my time on different things. Instead of finding stuff to flag, I handle existing flags.
    – Dharman Mod
    Nov 2 at 17:59
  • this question implies that moderators are going to take the required 30 minutes away from other non-SO activities, so either: 1) they are not already active on the site; or 2) they will dedicate to SO an additional 30 minutes on top of what they already do. The former sounds like someone with a low level of participation, and thus unclear how much they are familiar with the site policies and mod duties. The latter sounds like mods must be more engaged than when they were regular users, which is an unfair expectation.
    – blackgreen
    Nov 4 at 8:20

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