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Sometimes I see answers that use the full function() sentence to define a function (closure), but sometimes I see the shorthand \() available starting at R 4.1.0. Since it is possible that users are running pre 4.1 R engines, should I prefer the full version?

The same consideration applies with the new pipe |> vs %>% in most contexts.

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    Yes
    – TheMaster
    Oct 26, 2022 at 5:41
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    I'm not an SME but it is probably a good version to prefer the full version just to ensure the answer is as readable as possible. It's much easier to understand or search for a word such as function than a symbol such as \ . Oct 26, 2022 at 6:19
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    Should? Can't really be answered. Can? Most definitely. There's always going to be people running older versions. Doesn't mean every bit of code has to be adapted to the old engines.
    – Zoe is on strike Mod
    Oct 26, 2022 at 6:50
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    ... except for cases where the question explicitly asks about a version where it isn't supported (which itself has an exception of questions asking about a language feature or a stdlib feature that gets added later, though there's a minefield of exceptions, and exceptions with exceptions, where the general answer is "depends on the question")
    – Zoe is on strike Mod
    Oct 26, 2022 at 6:55
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    I don't know anything about R, but a similar feature in Python is f-strings (released in Python 3.6). In that case, I would put the code that doesn't use f-strings at the top of my answer; and then after that I would write "If you're on Python 3.6+, you can use f-strings: ...". But obviously, if the OP specifies their version, all that is unnecessary.
    – The Thonnu
    Oct 26, 2022 at 10:41
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    @TheThonnu why'd you do that when all versions that do not support f'' strings are already past end of life Oct 26, 2022 at 11:08
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    @AnttiHaapala--СлаваУкраїні - a lot of people are still on 3.4 or 3.5 even though they are not supported any more, so it won't work for them.
    – The Thonnu
    Oct 26, 2022 at 11:32
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    ^ That sounds like a similar problem we had in web development with people insisting on supporting IE... As a famous Disney princess once said: "Let it go!"
    – Cerbrus
    Oct 26, 2022 at 12:11
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    I'm not familiar with R, but if the shorthands means/work exactly the same as the old / longer forms, use the shorthands. If it was not used on the question on other answers, include a note about the shorthand meaning.
    – Wicket
    Oct 26, 2022 at 15:15

2 Answers 2

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I think it is important to be as clear as possible for future visitors of the answer, including for people who don't have a detailed knowledge of the language. Code should explain itself. Therefore, I always use function(x) over \() - the former is evidently clear whereas the latter isn't necessarily, and can lead to some terse code which can be hard to parse. Using function(x) also allows for backwards compatibility.

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    Disagree. The only reason you think the former is evidently clear is because of familiarity. If someone has never seen + operator, should we use add instead of +(assuming both are valid syntax) as it is more readable? If everyone knows + means addition, that's because it's used more often. And new syntax will only become familiar because of usage.
    – TheMaster
    Oct 26, 2022 at 11:28
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    I think it's more clear because the word function literally tells you what it is. Just like it's more clear when a sign on a shop front says 'shop' rather than some randomly chosen symbol.
    – user438383
    Oct 26, 2022 at 11:39
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    ...unless everyone who shopped, by convention or by edict of the language, used that same symbol to mean 'shop'. Of course, "shop" itself used to be spelled "shoppe", and yet somehow, we all became so accustomed to "shop" that "shoppe" looks antiquated now... Oct 26, 2022 at 13:45
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    @TheMaster + is used in tons of programming languages precisely because it is familiar in general. Many more people are familiar with the operator + than the word add – and yes that is exactly why one should prefer + when both are available and equivalent. Oct 26, 2022 at 14:12
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Let's go back in time, to when the first man, Johannes Widmann proposed the symbol + to refer to addition(not addition per se, but surplus). Of course, no one else was familiar with the fact that this symbol meant addition. There were other symbols in place(p̄, mer), which were more familiar to the public then.

Yet, his inner circle accepted it first, then his peers and finally the general public. The public accepted the new symbol to mean addition, so much so that today, it's more familiar than the actual word "addition". I'm sure R developers didn't introduce the symbol without discussions. I would trust their judgement here. As Stack Overflow is one of the core communities in the developer's world, I suggest we adapt the new as early as possible and use the old, only when needed(when the question explicitly asks for it). Over time, the new symbol will mean "function" more than the actual word "function". Change is not easy. But there are advantages to change. Imagine how hard it would be write equations like these without the use of shorthand or symbols like +; You'd would just be wasting everyone's time, not just yours.

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  • My choice (imho) in this case is to use function() as i believe R doc make it clear it is a "shorthand" second option. Of course, i agree that developers wouldn't have introduce it to be not used ever. But i feel that idiosincrasy of R is a little more conservative than, for case, Python, as for e.g. the late adoption of the \() lambda-like (and the disabled by default => ) reflects, although i'm not so experienced so far to be sure. What is sure to me is that it dont makes sense to clarify "if you run R>=4.1.0:" every time. Of course i would like a experienced consensus.
    – Ric
    Oct 26, 2022 at 15:48
  • @RicVillalba I agree. I'm only against not using it, because you want to support older systems. Unless the question explicitly asks for it, I think all answers should, in general, assume the latest version and answer accordingly.
    – TheMaster
    Oct 26, 2022 at 16:20

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