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Let me start with a simple but likely controversial statement: all answers (and therefore all questions) are necessarily opinion based answers, and any attempts to draw a distinction between "opinion based" answers and "objective fact based" answers relies on sophistry. To illustrate this, here is a simple example.

Suppose someone asks how to write a function to square an integer in Python. Here are 3 possible answers.

First, one obvious approach:

def square(n: int):
    return int(n)*int(n)

Second, a slightly different approach:

def square(n: int):
    return n**2

Third, what is without a doubt the dumbest piece of code I've ever written in my entire life:

def square(n: int):
    i = 0
    while True:
        if i == n*n:
            return i
        i += 1

Now, what distinguishes these approaches? Strictly speaking, all 3 of them fit the bill and answer the question. What is informative to a developer is understanding the ups and downs of each approach. For example, the first option will also work with some strings whereas the second will fail. This can be good or bad depending on context, and can lead to all sorts of discussions about best practices around dynamic typing in Python, like for example should some functions strictly check type or should you embrace duck typing at all times?

Now apparently, this is where we start entering "opinion based" territory, because it's no longer related to strictly answering the question and instead start opinionating on best practices. But if we do not allow such things, then what, pray tell, distinguishes those 2 answers from the god awful third one that made me feel dirty just writing it? If you're thinking "speed and efficiency", then why is that considered an "objective" measure and code maintainability is not?

My point is that what makes a high quality answer is precisely that it elaborates on such details that are very much opinion based. Especially when discussing specialized topics, all answers are just opinions. That does not put them on equal footing, some opinions are clearly better than others. It makes no sense to ban questions specifically seeking out more of that elaboration, and we are kidding ourselves if we believe that such "opinion based" thinking is not inevitably present in even the most trivial of answers about how to square an integer.

As it stands, many SO questions are hyper-specific and uninteresting "here is my homework how do I solve it please" type of questions. Those remain open because their hyper-specificity means they are not considered "opinion based". But many interesting questions are closed for being "too open" despite being, quite simply, more serious and more mature questions. These are the types of questions usually asked by budding developers that want to know more than just how to solve one specific problem, and are trying to get at the "why" of things. This leads to much higher quality content than yet another "y woN't kode compaIle pliz hAlp" question.

My point is not simply that we should allow "opinion based" questions, but is in fact a deeper criticism of the policy than that. My point is that all questions are necessarily opinion based, and any demarcation between that and "fact based" is completely artificial. Interpretation of facts (especially among experts) is necessarily an opinion. This insistance that the line is clear and that "this is fact, not opinion" reminds me of a particular obnoxious man who kept insisting to me that "Christianity is not a religion, it's a personal relationship with Jesus Christ". Which is just a fancy way of saying "My religion is not a religion because it's the right religion". Likewise "This answer is not an opinion it's a fact" is a fancy way of saying "This opinion isn't an opinion because it's the right opinion".

Again, none of this precludes the fact that some opinions are clearly better than others, that some opinions are indeed the right opinion. Quite the contrary. My point is that we're going to be excluding some of the best opinions out there if anytime a question is slightly broad we slap an "opinion based" flag on it, close it, and get on with our day.

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  • 16
    This looks to be argument by the slippery slope logical fallacy. You may not like the logic used to curate questions on this site, but the concrete evidence is that this site has survived and thrived (else you wouldn't be here) where many other sites that have allowed such questions (think, Yahoo!Answers) have fallen by the wayside. Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 1:22
  • 3
    My point is that this site already inevitably allows such questions, and has a counter productive line in the sand about what counts as "opinion based".
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 1:46
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    We agree that there are a lot of garbage questions on SO, but loosening restrictions on opinion-based questions will result in more garbage, not less. The cost is some false positives that are genuinely valuable questions otherwise. In other words, we disagree about whether the line in the sand is productive or not. I often head back to the gorilla vs shark blog post from 2011 for rationale. And if you enjoy discussing different approaches to the same code, check out Code Review SE.
    – ggorlen
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 1:56
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    As it stands most of the garbage is made up of questions that are extremely specific, and are garbage for that reason. That points to the opposite conclusion : we should encourage broader questions.
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 7:19
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    The gorilla vs shark argument isn't wrong, it just doesn't apply to most of the garbage. There are very few "is Python better than Perl" questions around SO, but there is a tremendous amount of "I'm trying to do exactly this, have tried practically nothing so far, please do it for me".
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 7:20
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    "I'm trying to do exactly this, have tried practically nothing so far, please do it for me" those questions need to be downvoted and closed after which those questions will be roomba-ed. That it doesn't happen (no downvoting, no close voting, no roomba) is because the few curators that care are wound up in discussion on Meta and the very few that didn't got sick of being called dishonest / doing counter productive things every other day.
    – rene
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 8:24
  • 1
    No, my point is that opinion based answers are in fact the norm, and the "opinion based" close reason is all too often used to shut down broad questions that are still perfectly relevant here.
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 10:19
  • 1
    Related (blog post): Good Subjective, Bad Subjective Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 14:06
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    "and the "opinion based" close reason is all too often used to shut down broad questions that are still perfectly relevant here." If this is your central claim, why did you write several paragraphs citing zero examples of this happening, talking about completely different and unrelated bad questions, and making an irrelevant argument about the subjective judgment of answers? Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 19:21
  • 2
    "Now, what distinguishes these approaches? Strictly speaking, all 3 of them fit the bill and answer the question. Yes, and that's fine, because this question did not ask for a subjective judgment. People who vote on the answers are offering their judgment, which may be subjective. That has nothing to do with inviting subjectivity by the nature of the question. If the question doesn't admit any answer that actually addresses the problem or task, then it must propose an objective metric. There is no contradiction here. Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 19:23
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    This is a pointless bit of mental gymnastics. So the question doesn't explicitely invite subjectivity, but we all know that good answers are necessarily subjectively measured as good. Again this is my whole point, whether you ask for it or not the subjectivity is implicitly there.
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 22:02
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    I hate 'best pratice' questions. They are very often underspecified and lead to conversations instead of solutions. That, or open confrontations. My favourites for global thermonuclear war are: 'you must always initialize variables where they are declared', (even if they are 256k buffers that are written into on the next line), 'you must free up all dynamically allocated memory before terminating your process, (impractical, counter-productive and near impossible with any non-trivial process), and 'you must gracefully terninate all threads before exit' (impossible if not impractical). Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 5:24
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    Brave strategy, Ticster. This was an opportunity to put a positive and kind case forward for "edge cases", but you decided to punch readers on the nose first (see the title) prior to asking them to respond positively to you.
    – halfer
    Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 8:27
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    There's nothing particularly aggressive about anything I said. Disagreement is not a form of verbal assault.
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 16:03
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    None of what you describe is even remotely aggressive. Though most internet forums these days have become accustomed to such a narrow range of views that most serious disagreements appear as apocalyptic events.
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 18:55

1 Answer 1

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This close reason is meant for questions that are primarily opinion based. It's meant to protect Stack Overflow from polls, useless discussions, wild unsubstantiated recommendations and other answers that consist only of a personal opinion. We close questions such as:

  • What is your favorite language?

  • Do you like my code?

  • Is buying this IDE worth it?

  • If you were to start a new project now what would it be?

  • Please suggest any improvements to my code.

  • Does owning cats make you a better developer?

You are right that every answer is a little opinionated, but that's ok. We understand that. That's why we don't close all questions as opinion based. It's perfectly fine to ask questions such as:

  • How can I make my algorithm faster?

  • What would be the most correct way to write this function?

  • Why is it better to write A instead of B?

These are likely to elicit an opinion too, but one that can be supported with facts and useful to developers. It's not just an expression of your opinion, but knowledge sharing. Above questions produce valuable answers, even though opinions may differ.

If a question falls in some grey area, you can try to edit it to prevent closure.

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    This is the question that spurred my post (not my question, but it got closed after I gave a fairly comprehensive answer). It's a clear question about common things to look out for when receiving data dumps. It's somewhat broad for sure, but is more interesting than 80% of new questions these days. It still got closed, even though it's basically just asking "what specifications are required for this type of task".
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 8:53
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    In other words, by all means close polls and pointless "is C++ better than Python" questions. But there is a broad consensus that any question that touches on best practices should be closed, and that's a bad idea, if only because de facto most answers implicitly have a smattering of best practice recommendations in them.
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 9:17
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    @ticster That question is not only opinion-based, but also too broad and off-topic because it doesn't seem to have anything to do with programming.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 11:56
  • How on earth does data processing have nothing to do with programming ?
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 12:19
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    The question isn't asking how to write software to process the files. It just asks what file format to store information in. That's it. No programming involved. They just want to store a file on a server.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 12:42
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    I mean really this is where we part ways. The general attitude at SO is to narrow what's acceptable as much as possible (like considering data storage in data engineering to be non programming related) as though that is what will increase quality. And I find the correlation, at least these days, to run the other way. Most of the garbage is hyper specific, and the few quality questions are broader in scope.
    – ticster
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 13:59
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    “As though that is what will increase quality”…I think it’s more “that is what will stem the tide”. SO is already overrun with crap, we need ways to stop it. If that means that some subjects which, in a perfect world, would otherwise have been viable for the site get sidelined, then so be it. If everyone played by the rules, I think you’d have a good point about this data processing question potentially being programming related, at least implicitly. But we don’t live in that world, SO needs a narrow scope just to survive these days IMO
    – Clive
    Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 14:37
  • 1
    all answers (and therefore all questions) are necessarily opinion based answers That's just your opinion. Commented Oct 1, 2022 at 21:29
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    'How can I make my algorithm faster?' Faster to execute? On what hardware? Do you have enough memory for a lookup-table? Is there enough data to thread off to a pool? Did you mean faster to develop, test and debug? Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 4:54
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    'What would be the most correct way to write this function?' Define 'correct'. If you have to deliver tomorrow and your first, simple solution works, though slow and inefficient, then that is the correct way. Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 4:58
  • 'Why is it better to write A instead of B?' Better for what? 'better', for me, usually means 'easier to debug', YMMV. Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 5:01
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    ....so, many of these 'opinion' qurstions are vague and underspecified. They lead to chat conversations instead of solutions. Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 5:04
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    @MartinJames sure, if they lack details you can still vote to close
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 7:59
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    The question gives us no idea what your goals or requirements are, so there is no way we can possibly decide what format would be better or worse for OP. Multiple data formats exist for a reason; they have strengths and weaknesses according to the purpose of the data etc. We can't possibly tell OP what questions to ask; that could fill a book. Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 18:16
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    "How on earth does data processing have nothing to do with programming" Because the question does not tell us anything about the programming that will be done with that data - how it will be processed. So far, the only thing we know about the data is that it has previously been sent to OP via email, and that it needs to be stored in an s3 bucket. Neither of those things involves writing code. Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 18:17

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