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In this latest update on Collectives, we’ve got information about a central index for Articles, a change to help identify potential Recognized Members, and news about the GitLab Collective.

Articles Index

Articles from all Collectives will be indexed at a dedicated URL: https://stackoverflow.com/collectives/articles. They will remain visibly associated with a Collective as long as that Collective exists.

If a Collective is decommissioned, the Articles will remain discoverable via conventional search methods based on content. This way, the long-form knowledge content can continue to be a resource for the Stack Overflow community even if their respective Collective sunsets.

Articles will still be editable by their original author, and can also be edited by staff and moderators if necessary. Public comments as well as author suggestions will also still be possible.

GitLab Collective will be Decommissioned

The GitLab Collective will be decommissioned at the end of September, so the published Articles from that Collective will become disassociated at that time.

The past year has been one of growth and learning for Collectives, and we’ve seen that the way customers have approached using their Collective has varied widely. This is no surprise, since the way companies approach all types of developer relations can vary just as widely.

This variation has allowed us to explore what works well and where the collaborative approach needs to change. The Collective is a cooperation at all levels, ranging from the business relationship to the day-to-day oversight. Good collaboration is important for success, and we’re learning more about what that means with each new customer.

The team at GitLab has been great to work with, and we’re grateful for their work integrating the Collective into their suite of developer relations venues. Though the current collaboration with GitLab is concluding, we’re optimistic about working with them again in the future.

Identifying Recognized Member Candidates

One area where some customers have been hesitant to take further steps is promoting Collective members to become Recognized Members. It’s understandable — Recognized Members can add the organization’s “seal of approval” to content, and it’s a big step to offer that ability to someone!

So we have created some automated processes to help customers recognize members whose expertise and high quality contributions have added value to a Collective. Those users may receive invitations to become Recognized Members, and we’ll be assisting our customers in monitoring their progress, advising on strategy, and shepherding relationships as needed.

Ultimately, Recognized Members can help the Collective — and more broadly, the Stack Overflow Community — flourish, by expanding the ways subject matter experts can contribute to the community of knowledge and learning.


I’d like to conclude this post by acknowledging that there is a wide range of sentiment around Collectives in the community. We are still learning and iterating and we appreciate your feedback as that continues.

As an opt-in feature, those who are interested in becoming more involved in a Collective can do so, and those who don’t can continue participating on Stack Overflow as they always have. We have previously outlined the rationale for exploring the Collectives concept, based heavily on user research and a desire to bring mutual benefit to both the community and customers.

As we’ve noted, engagement from users that join a Collective increased about 30% across associated tags after they joined. Increased activity from knowledgeable community members is a win for everyone, and we appreciate your patience and open minds as we explore and fine-tune the approach. We’ll continue to share progress with regular updates like this.

Some questions for the community:

  • If you’ve been a member of the GitLab Collective, what more would you have liked to see?
  • If you’ve joined a Collective, what qualities do you think make for a good Recognized Member?
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    "So we have created some automated processes to help customers recognize members whose expertise and high quality contributions have added value to a Collective" - so you can do that, but not identify low-quality questions and make them easier to close? And/or offer guidance to the asker to help them improve it ahead of time? I see the priorities are where the money is as usual Sep 26 at 13:32
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    Have collectives resulted in an increase in contributions in general, or did it just move contributions from a broader range of tags to the ones being sponsored
    – Kevin B
    Sep 26 at 14:49
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    Level with me here, Berthold. What kind of feedback do you really want to hear? What is the kind of engagement you're interested in facilitating? There was a lot of good stuff on the last Collective announcement that seemed to get...no energy from staff, so instead of trying to put some thoughts together to try to facilitate a candid discussion about this, I want to be sure that doing so is actually going to bear some fruit.
    – Makoto
    Sep 26 at 15:27
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    @Makoto Considering the current silence so far (and my own history of being blatantly ignored on feedback/question posts), I'm inclined to believe this is yet another dead end. At worst, though, anything you post might be considered internally without any public engagement or acknowledgement that it has been discussed or addressed. I've come to believe the only approach to dealing with these discussions ("discussions") is persistence. Maybe we'll see action one day:tm: then. (read: we can't win the battles, but we might win the war by fighting the battles anyway) Sep 26 at 17:09
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    @Berthold: Fair enough. From that I can conclude that the kind of feedback we want to provide isn't the kind of feedback that you're going to action. That's unfortunate, since it isn't like we're actively your enemies on this - since you've pinned this to Stack Overflow's future, we'd want it to be successful to. I just no longer see any vehicle in which to do so, especially now with two of these having to close due to lack of vendor support. I suppose I can leave it at that then. Hopefully you find your demographic to get feedback from, since I don't trust that they're on Meta.
    – Makoto
    Sep 26 at 17:55
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    @Berthold I'm not specifically talking about collectives; the bulk of my experience has come from my several attempts at asking about severe problems with FQ with extra steps (AKA the staging ground), with multiple different angles that just got slapped with the unconstructive label (including one sourced in actual data; and yes, I'm still salty about that). The war metaphor isn't as much about SE being an enemy as it is SE making decisions the community disagrees with, and then doing what seems like asking for input when it's just disregarded. It's battles because the discussions offered (1/? Sep 26 at 18:22
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    seem to just be announcements where the positives are cherry-picked and many concerns just get disregarded. This is a pattern when it comes to communicating with other SE employees, and has been one more or less the entire time I've been active on meta. The status quo is little to no actual discussion, and boils down to either positives and support, or deciding to go down the war path of persistence, because it's the only thing that makes even a dent in a few of these plans. A lack of transparency on far too many things does not help here, but that's company policy at this point (2/3) Sep 26 at 18:25
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    I sympathise with disregarding "collectives should be removed" on feedback posts, but when improvements get disregarded, at least publicly, that's when it becomes a problem. Same with concerns raised about upcoming features (such as my data-sourced answer citing the staging ground as unviable in practice). Stuff like this has historically been a battle in a greater war; the war of getting community-oriented features from a for-profit company. Collectives gets answerer classification, but we barely get help with user onboarding (3/4 apparently) Sep 26 at 18:30
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    We have numerous abandoned site parts (including chat. It has been in early beta or alpha or whatever for a decade. It still says SO's license is CC-Wiki 2.5), parts that need far more attention than what they're getting (reviewer onboarding and queues in general. User onboarding. Question and answer quality. Automation across posts and comments), and things that shouldn't ever have made it past testing or approval (particularly accessibility issues, the blog, since it's forced on a public list, etc.), as well as features we or CMs benefit from. Getting even some of these are a constant fight Sep 26 at 18:34
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    that we've been constantly losing. The review queues only received an overhaul after Sam went to war with some queue I'm forgetting atm. Persistence being the only strategy to get any meaningful improvements to the public site is an awful place to be in. That's possibly why we're losing curators across the board, and seeing a substantially lower interest in the moderator position; the problems constantly evolve, while the tools we use to deal with it, and at the same time guide users to do better, don't. Sep 26 at 18:39
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    @Berthold: I don't intend to belabor the point here or continue down this rabbit hole for too much longer, but I suppose the chief reason why I reach for the war metaphor is that it is a literal battle to get the company to recognize that the feedback provided for this is not "the same". To dismiss out-of-hand the feedback I left when y'all shut down the first collective as "the same feedback repeated over and over" is nothing short of an insult.
    – Makoto
    Sep 26 at 19:30
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    @Berthold: Or maybe a better way to think about it is, if a group of people keep asking the same question and aren't satisfied with the original explanation, then perhaps the explanation wasn't that great to begin with? But I'll leave it here; I've said far too much already.
    – Makoto
    Sep 26 at 19:31
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    @Berthold "Your feedback matters, and is meaningful" - wikipedia would slap a citation needed on that. From a community perspective, it's not meaningful to invest time into posting long, thought-out feedback to things like article reputation and then get it dismissed with a reply that boils down to "nah, we think it's fine". Especially as we had similar discussions back when docs launched where SO buried their heads in the sand until they deleted the feature because it was a (predicted) dumpster fire. So in the future expect more comments like above instead of elaborate feedback.
    – l4mpi
    Sep 27 at 11:16
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    @davidbak as far as I understand, it's a paid feature, so maybe GitLab just didn't feel it's worth their money and decided to stop paying for it. This can of course happen any time with any other collectives.
    – l4mpi
    Sep 30 at 9:56

2 Answers 2

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there is a wide range of sentiment around Collectives [...] and we appreciate your feedback as that continues.

I think what people are getting tired of, is staff posting announcements like these, then ignoring most if not all feedback and then going through with the changes anyway, if the announcement wasn't already retroactive to begin with.

Stack Exchange Staff has been largely ignoring bug questions for months now. Most don't even get a tag anymore (although sometimes mods apply those), we have no idea what's even being considered. To me, it seems more and more like Meta is there to keep users blissfully suspended by at least letting them vent their frustrations (QED), even though they won't be followed up on.

The community at large does not seem to care about collectives that much, nor about updates about them (source: the score of the questions they're posted as), the community just want better moderation tools and long-standing bugs fixed.

I get it, cheese gets moved and this isn't a democracy; it's not our site but your site, but in terms of feedback: y'all got any more of that?

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    "Staff has been largely ignoring bug questions for months now. Most don't even get a [status-review] tag anymore" – In general, I think there are too many posts on meta for developers to be reasonably expected to see them all. However, adding the [status-review] tag to a post (per this process) does create a ticket for us internally, which CMs then triage to the appropriate person/team. As you can see, quite a few bugs have been fixed, though there are always more.
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    Sep 29 at 22:32
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    @V2Blast thanks for your reply! I just wanted to put down my feelings about bug posts, which in my memory (but we tend to romanticize things, don't we) used to get more staff interaction in the past. To me it seems that staff is giving more attention to new features than on fixing old bugs, and it starts to get annoying to see announcements about "benign" or "irrelevant" (imho) changes while the things I'd like to see changed don't change. Just putting my opinion out here, hope it's not seen as attack or insult. :)
    – CodeCaster
    Sep 30 at 9:25
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GitLab Collective will be Decommissioned

I have been the top contributor to the GitLab collective for some time, so it's really sad to see this go. The collective leaderboard was something that motivated me a lot to contribute there. Also kind of bummed that the article I put a lot of time into authoring will be less discoverable as a result of the decommissioning.

Though the current collaboration with GitLab is concluding

Collectives should be able to exist absent of collaboration with GitLab or other companies. I see collectives are effective because of their members and contributors, not necessarily their sponsors. I'm not 100% sure how exactly that would work (maybe mod-style elections for collective admins?), but I, for example, would be happy to help in that respect for the GitLab collective.

After all, do we really want the existence/success of collectives to be at the discretion of companies whose dedication and motivations may change over time and/or not be aligned with that of the collective community?

If you’ve been a member of the GitLab Collective, what more would you have liked to see?

More answers "recommended by gitlab" and more contributors being 'recognized' by the collective.

If you’ve joined a Collective, what qualities do you think make for a good Recognized Member?

Essentially, regular contributors who have the qualities of a subject matter expert. Specifically, a recognized member should have (1) a strong familiarity with using SO (ideally high reputation) and (2) strong familiarity in the collective subject matter.

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    Collectives definitely are helpful to discover related QAs and the articles. I would've loved to see collectives around (maybe just add some label that it's decommissioned). For now it looks like all answers by recognized members seem to be technically "recommended" (they show up when you have "has recommended answer" filter in collective page) and "recognized" members seems to be someone the company knows or employees and not just Stackoverflow activity. But hey, you are still top on the Gitlab tag :)
    – Dharmaraj
    Sep 29 at 19:54
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    "Collectives should be able to exist absent of collaboration with GitLab or other companies" - by my understanding, the primary motivation for collectives is to create another revenue stream for SO (a bit like sponsored tabs, but more extensive). In the absence of sponsors and thus revenue, I doubt SO would care much about the feature.
    – l4mpi
    Sep 30 at 9:55
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    sytech, thank you for your detailed and insightful thoughts. As well as for your diligent work within the Collective over the past year. Indeed, a core idea behind Collectives is to create an added sense of subcommunity around the specific set of topics/tags. The sponsorships have allowed us to explore that more via development and to understand how the mutual benefit can emerge. But it's not the only way to do it, and we're excited to build on what we've learned and keep exploring. I hope you'll continue to participate and provide insight as we do that!
    – Berthold StaffMod
    Sep 30 at 14:07
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    @Dharmaraj Thanks for your comment as well, and I appreciate your observations on the implicit vs explicit types of answer recommendation. Do you perceive the answers differently one way or the other? That's definitely something we've discussed and so are curious about how you see it. Regarding who becomes an RM, as noted in the post we're going to be bringing more community members into that role based on activity and content quality. It's not meant to be just for people who are already known to the company, though it makes sense that those are the ones who have the role at launch.
    – Berthold StaffMod
    Sep 30 at 14:16
  • @Berthold when I had first use "recommended answers" filter, I was expecting to see only explicitly marked answers but many of them were fixes for general issues like syntax errors or even duplicates. For RMs, I'm not sure what the " automated processes to help customers recognize members" are but pretty sure the admins have a way already in their statistics dashboard or even members list.
    – Dharmaraj
    Sep 30 at 14:55
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    Also I did notice, the list isn't updated at all times. A user may have employee badge even if they are not part of the company (at least their profile mentions some other company).
    – Dharmaraj
    Sep 30 at 14:56
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    Contributions to collectives should be recognised and shown in user profiles even if the collective is decomissioned. Oct 4 at 5:22
  • @Abdur-RahmaanJanhangeer The primary contributions (questions, answers and published articles) will continue to be shown on the user profile page. Did you have something more in mind?
    – John M. Wright StaffMod
    Oct 5 at 16:33
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    @JohnM.Wright the leaderboard stats and/or trophies would be nice.
    – sytech
    Oct 6 at 2:48

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