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Asynchronous vs synchronous execution. What is the difference?

  1. It's a good question and has some good answers.
  2. This kind of question is meant to be broad and not "focused".
  3. I don't think this question fits into any other sites. I think the one who closed this question also agrees on this because he didn't vote that it was "off-topic".

As I see it, Stack Overflow is refusing this kind of question, which I think is bad. And this is why sometimes I head for Reddit for programming question searching.

What do you think?

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  • Stack Overflow is not a dictionary. "Asynchronous" and "synchronous" mean the same thing to programmers that they mean to everyone else. "I don't think this question fits into any other sites. I think the one who closed this question also agrees on this beacuse he didn't tagged as "off-topic"." Questions don't automatically belong here just because they "don't belong anywhere else". Some questions don't belong anywhere on the Stack Exchange network. The closure reasons don't map as neatly as you might expect, and what appears in the box is only a loose translation of the options we select. Sep 25 at 4:06
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    @KarlKnechtel: This question comes up very often in programming across a broad spectrum of languages, frameworks and/or libraries. Disregarding this just as a dictionary-style question would rob us of a ton of valuable knowledge that could be shown on the site.
    – Makoto
    Sep 25 at 4:20
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    @KarlKnechtel Good to know "The closure reasons don't map as neatly as you might expect, and what appears in the box is only a loose translation of the options we select.". But I think the question is on-topic and toally agree with Makoto.
    – Rick
    Sep 25 at 4:29
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    @KarlKnechtel Synchronous does not mean exactly the same in plain English as in programming. The word can be used to mean simultaneous, which in computing is expressed by concurrent. This is not at all what we mean by describing code like a(); b(); as "synchronous" and the plain dictionary definition can lead to radically different understanding of the code. The word can also mean that two things operate the same. E.g., synchronised watches or synchronised movements. Thus saying "the code is synchronous" using this definition would lead to the natural question "with what?"
    – VLAZ
    Sep 25 at 7:58
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    It has now been reopened. We should at least curate the existing answers, some are just plain wrong and some are just repeating the earlier answers. There's really no reason to just keep repeating existing answers or offer different analogies that mean the same thing. Sep 25 at 8:01

1 Answer 1

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I think it's on-topic, but I don't think just anyone should be posting answers to it anymore.

This is a question that's managed to get a lot of answers from '09, and the answers on it are pretty good and comprehensive. I'm not seeing a whole lot of reason to do anything with the question at this point besides answer-lock it.

If we get new answers or new information, we can update the answer(s) on it.

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  • I agree with you. It feels like the moderator was in fact closing the question for preventing new answers. Because there's already plenty of exsiting answers. So maybe we should add a new reason e.g. answer-lock instead of "not focused". "Not focused" is confusing.
    – Rick
    Sep 25 at 4:17
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    No there's a very specific question lock that can be applied. In this case, the question was just closed. It should be locked instead.
    – Makoto
    Sep 25 at 4:21
  • As for "If we get new answers or new information, we can update the answer(s) on it.", I am not sure. If there's something new in the field of the question and people don't find an exsiting question as good as a template to update on, then I think we should always give the rights to write new answers. At worst cases, new answers would just sink. But I feel that stackoverflow don't like too many answers for a question.
    – Rick
    Sep 25 at 4:22
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    Well, no...the point of the site isn't just to pile a dozen answers that will get buried over time, it's to refine and improve answers to questions over time. Scrolling through 30 answers on Stack Overflow isn't any different than trying to hit Page 2 on Google.
    – Makoto
    Sep 25 at 4:24
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    Good to know "the point of the site isn't just to pile a dozen answers that will get buried over time, it's to refine and improve answers to questions over time.". Now I understand the site's spirit better. Thank you. At last, could you find me a question as an example of "question lock"? I am trying to find one. And where is the terms of use of "question lock"? I searched stackoverflow.com/help/closed-questions but found nothing
    – Rick
    Sep 25 at 4:34
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    @Rick I think Makato is referring to posts with historical locks - this answer shows how to find them. For more generally locked questions there's this. Sep 25 at 6:25
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    @Rick "...stackoverflow don't like too many answers for a question." Personally, it's not the quantity of the answers that is a problem, it's the quality. If the newer answers are just repeating the older answers, then they're just noise, and they just make it harder to read all the answers to get all the information you need. Sep 25 at 8:19
  • @GinoMempin Well, in some ways I agree that poeple who want to improve some answers can update on existing answers. But as I said in previous comment, "what if people don't find an exsiting question as good as a template to update on? Then I think we should always give the rights to write new answers. "
    – Rick
    Sep 25 at 9:04
  • @GinoMempin StackOverflow now has good mechanism raise new good answers (sort by Trending (recent votes count more)). For repeating answers or bad new answers: 1. Based on my experience using StackOverflow, most people would just read several top-voted answers and leave. So bad new answers won't interfere existing good answers. 2. If new answers are bad, a 1~3 downvotes could easily make them sink and people really do downvote. What I want to say is that, at least we should allow people to write new answers, so that we can discover new good answers despite of some new bad answers.
    – Rick
    Sep 25 at 9:04
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    @Rick: The first three answers all cover the same ground in the same way. There's not a lot of extra dimensions to comparing the two terms so adding yet more perspectives only dilutes answers. So, putting an answer lock on this is the best solution. People looking for the answer get it, and if we have to revise it, we can just edit one answer. Less overhead and headache overall.
    – Makoto
    Sep 26 at 2:36
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    @snakecharmerb No, I think they did mean an answer lock; like on this question. Answer locks do pretty much exactly what they say on the tin, the question can't be answered anymore, but existing answers can still be interacted with and refined; comments on the question also get disabled. Historical locks, on the other hand, are specifically designed as an escape hatch for content that we want to keep for whatever reason but also want to designate as "off topic" in some way at the same time.
    – zcoop98
    Sep 26 at 15:51
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    @GinoMempin "Personally, it's not the quantity of the answers that is a problem, it's the quality." Yes, but: on the other hand, it's very rare that a question admits a large number of quality answers, while also being properly focused and on topic. Sep 26 at 21:55

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