6

In the C tag wiki and C++ tag wiki we have established rules for how to deal with cross-tagging of posts with both and at once, as well as guidelines for user moderators. I was the one pushing for this some years back here: Proposed update to C and C++ tag usage wikis. And the wikis were updated after that discussion with the C and C++ communities. The main problem that we needed rules for how to address was incorrect cross-tagging of C and C++ to the same question.

Among the user moderator guidelines, this was added:

Answers with C++ code to a C question that has never been tagged c++ should be deleted as off-topic.

Similarly, I would assume that the same applies to C answers to a C++ question, where features unique to C are used - although these are probably more rare. "C style" answers that will compile on a C++ compiler are ok, as in shouldn't be deleted, but perhaps down-voted.

These kind of wrong language answers are not just wrong and confusing, they are off-topic as they do not attempt to answer the question about a certain programming language.


My question is: how do we carry out deletion of blatantly off-topic answers in practice?


The checklist/work flow for a user moderator checking such C or C++ answers would look something like:

  • Should I even be moderating this? As in, do I have C and/or C++ gold badges and at least 3k+ rep?

  • Is the answer definitely off-topic? Is it suggesting C++ only features to a C question? Or C only features to a C++ question?

  • Double check that the question never contained the incorrect tag at any point in its edit history. That is, if a post was never tagged C++ at any point, a C++-only answer was always off-topic. But if it was at some point (correctly or incorrectly) tagged C++, then we should let the answer be. The question may however presently have the wrong tags.

    For example if originally tagged , then a C++ answer was posted, then someone removed the tag. That's unfortunate but then we need to rollback the C++ tag, since it's no fault of the answerer that the question used the wrong tags. Or perhaps the question was even too unclear to be answered in the first place.

  • If yes to all of the above, then we should delete the blatantly off-topic answer.

But how do we do the deletion in practice? If the answer has negative score, then 20k+ rep can delete it. Flagging for low quality or diamond mod doesn't seem like the right way to go, since reviewers or diamond mods may not have the necessary domain knowledge. Going to one of the SO chats (SOCVR, C or C++ chats) and hope to rally support for some down-voting posse sounds both cumbersome and questionable in general.


Example:

How do I determine the size of my array in C? has this answer. The question was never tagged C++ yet the answer only applies to C++. The score is +18 -5 = 13 currently. There is little hope of down-voting it far enough to enable delete-voting any time soon. What should be done with such answers?

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    At least the first half of the answer seems to be applicable to C.
    – BDL
    Sep 12 at 13:24
  • 19
    "how do we carry out deletion of blatantly incorrect answers in practice?" I'm not a C/C++ user, however, I don't see how the answer is different to any other tag. If you see an answer in the wrong language to a question, downvote it. If you feel that it's so wrong that needs deletion, then if you have the privilege use it to vote to delete it. That's it. I would hope that [c] and [c++] have enough SMEs within the tag to then address the answer and it'll be deleted fairly promptly.
    – Larnu
    Sep 12 at 13:27
  • 8
    I, and other SMEs in [sql-server] downvote and vote to delete answers in the wrong dialect when we encounter them, and I am sure that SMEs for other (R)DBMS do the same for their dialect; why is [c] and [c++] different?
    – Larnu
    Sep 12 at 13:28
  • 2
    @BDL Doesn't really matter - answers in another language with code that will never compile is plain wrong and confusing. If I wrote an answer where the first half is about C and the second half is about saving the unicorns from extinction, my answer should be deleted.
    – Lundin
    Sep 12 at 13:30
  • 1
    If users have found answers for the wrong language "useful" they are likely mislead like the answerer, and think that C and C++ are the same; perhaps an edit to the answer to say "in C++/C (remove as appropriate) you can do this" would help to avoid users who are searching the right language aren't mislead (and hopefully they will downvote the answer).
    – Larnu
    Sep 12 at 13:31
  • 2
    @Larnu The root of the problem is that some very old posts like the one I linked come from a time when the site had more lax standards. And they've gained strange up-votes over time despite being very low quality. There's lots of examples like that, where some old question sits at +50 votes because 55 newbies found it helpful but 5 experts found it harmful, incorrect or off-topic. The problem with these is that score is by no means a measure of post quality, just post age.
    – Lundin
    Sep 12 at 13:34
  • 2
    Hence my suggestion of '... perhaps an edit to the answer to say "in C++/C (remove as appropriate) you can do this" would help ...' @Lundin .
    – Larnu
    Sep 12 at 13:36
  • 2
    @Larnu I really don't see why we need to preserve blatantly incorrect or off-topic answer at all. Is the goal of SO to become a high quality collection of knowledge or a diverse quality collection of random stuff? If we look at encyclopedias or even wikipedia, they don't attempt or strive to keep incorrect facts next to the correct ones just for the heck of it. Because doing so would be ridiculous.
    – Lundin
    Sep 12 at 13:39
  • Could you perhaps edit the question to explain why this case is different than the canonical meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/271207?
    – cigien
    Sep 12 at 13:43
  • 6
    Wikipedia doesn't have a voting system to denote if something is useful/helpful or not though, @Lundin . There aren't just "incorrect" answers out there, there are incredibly dangerous answers out there that have 100's of upvotes because, for lack of better words, people don't read/care. I'm not saying that's an excuse, but my point is that if Stack Overflow won't remove dangerous answers, wrong answers are of even less importance. The real solution, in my opinion, is that more people should be using their downvotes; far too many people don't.
    – Larnu
    Sep 12 at 13:44
  • @cigien I don't really see how that one is canonical since it actually doesn't explain how to deal with questions that are found to be off-topic. "Of course a question which is "how do I do this in Python" should not get answers in C#" Yeah sure but my Python question did anyway - now what?
    – Lundin
    Sep 12 at 13:49
  • @Lundin I referred to it as a canonical because that's what all the related questions are closed against. There are plenty of duplicates with answers on how to deal with it, for example meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/290046. It basically boils down to downvote, and vote to delete if it's appropriate, and the answer is eligible. I can't seen any indication that a custom mod flag would work to delete it, and none of the standard flags apply.
    – cigien
    Sep 12 at 13:55
  • 2
    Re: "Is the goal of SO to become a high quality collection of knowledge" - that, as has been parroted ad infinitum. But I don't think anyone has ever stated that the goal is that Stack Overflow only has high quality questions and answers. It's the dream, but given the anti-gatekeeping design of the site simply not possible.
    – Gimby
    Sep 12 at 15:21
  • 1
    @Gimby And why can't the site be re-designed if it is bad by design? For example it would be possible to create a special delete review queue that you only get access too if you have the relevant badge(s) and/or a certain amount of rep. The only difference between such a review and the Not an answer/Very low quality reviews that we already have in place, would be that it requires some domain knowledge to do the reviews. The present delete review queues can delete any post no matter the votes.
    – Lundin
    Sep 13 at 7:53
  • 2
    @DrewReese I agree with that and a review queue was just a loose idea. But I don't buy the "it can't be done because that's how the site was designed" arguments, it implies that the site is set in stone. Sure, getting the company to care about their own products is nearly impossible these days, but they still roll out poorly considered ideas now and then, so they aren't entirely disconnected from the site yet.
    – Lundin
    Sep 14 at 6:21

4 Answers 4

36

I know there will be those who disagree, but I would say: Don't worry about it.

It is an article of near-religious faith on SO that C and C++ are two completely different languages. But out there in the real world it's not that simple. There are many, many people out there who imagine that one language is a dialect of the other, or something. There are many, many people out there who believe they are programming in "C/C++" and using a "C/C++ compiler" to do so. These people are wrong according to the SO mantra, but there are so many of them that no amount of proselytizing on SO is ever going to convert them all. There are so many of them that, in one sense, they might as well be right.

So the cited answer is, IMO, not useless. If you are a programmer in the C family of languages, it's a reasonable part of your education to know abut the limitations of fixed-size C style arrays. It's reasonable to know about the benefits of C++ std::vectors, even if you're programming in pure C or otherwise not in a position to use std::vectors.

Yes, attitudes change over time, but at least in this case, the fact that the cited question's voting total reflects "a time when the site had more lax standards" is actually an accurate reflection. The post had value then and still has value today. If enough time passes and consensus changes sufficiently, its score will continue to decrease, and it might even be deleted. But it doesn't need, today, any special action to delete it. Its score (especially relative to the accepted answer) reflects its value. Why delete it? It contains nothing dangerous, heretical, or wrong.

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    I would disagree with "It's reasonable to know about the benefits of C++ std::vectors, even if you're programming in pure C or otherwise not in a position to use std::vectors.". If I'm trying to find an answer to a C only question about arrays, I don't care what the solution would be in C++. Why would that be helpful? Maybe I could switch to C++, but there are many reasons I couldn't. So why would I care about an answer for C++?
    – TarHalda
    Sep 12 at 18:16
  • You're a bit over the shop on this one. The answer is determined to be factually false by C experts, and the fact that the question was created a decade-plus ago is immaterial to the answer existing.
    – Makoto
    Sep 12 at 18:16
  • 4
    @Makoto I think your conclusion about "determined to be factually false" is somewhat over-the-top, also. We know only that 5 users deemed it "not useful", but we don't know who those users were or specifically why they voted. I am a C expert, and I don't find that answer "factually false". Sep 12 at 18:29
  • 4
    @SteveSummit: Let's start with this: you may not be able to always store the size of an array at its initialization since it may have been created by code that you don't control or have access to. So, always storing the size somewhere is an academic exercise in the optimistic. Next, std::vector just doesn't exist in C. This is me saying that this answer is incorrect if I were asking about it from a C perspective, and I don't really dabble too much with C or C++ these days, nor would I consider myself an expert in the languages.
    – Makoto
    Sep 12 at 19:12
  • 8
    @Makoto Sure. That's a useful, healthy difference of opinion. That's why we have votes, to give readers hints about which answers to pay more versus less attention to. But "not useful if you (Makoto) were asking about it from a C perspective" is very different from "factually false for any and every reader". And I definitely believe there's a place for answers which may be irrelevant to 90% of readers, but are potentially very relevant to some 10% minority. Sep 12 at 20:17
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    @Bellrampion: "If I'm trying to find an answer to a C only question about arrays" But is that how people usually find answers? Google gives them whatever, and it is entirely possible that someone who has the same problem but is working in C++ will also find this "C only question". I'm not saying that this is a good, on-topic answer. But it isn't bad because it doesn't help someone who specifically found the question by searching in the C tag on Stack Overflow. Sep 13 at 1:31
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    " There are many, many people out there who believe they are programming in "C/C++" and using a "C/C++ compiler" to do so." And the solution to this is to educate them, not to leave them fumbling in the dark. That's on of the main reasons that SO exists. Students can even go to SO for second opinion when they doubt that their teacher or tutorial is correct - and most of the time, SO is more correct than the average C programming teacher let alone the average sketchy Internet tutorial. If the focus of this site isn't to provide high-quality answers, then it has lost its very reason to exist.
    – Lundin
    Sep 13 at 6:13
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    Arduino is another example of a blurry C/C++ boundary : technically, it's C++, but since many libraries aren't available (STL for example), any answer mentioning std::vector, std::string or std::map cannot be applied. And you're stuck with good ol' char arrays. So "C-style" answers could be very convenient, even if the question specifically mentions C++. Sep 13 at 8:45
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    @EricDuminil Style is not the problem here. Valid but bad C++ is still C++. Invalid C is not C.
    – Passer By
    Sep 13 at 9:42
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    @SteveSummit I don't think you'd agree to adding a python answer to a C question that's hypothetically "helpful to know", so why exempt C++?
    – Passer By
    Sep 13 at 9:45
  • 1
    @PasserBy 1. But that's different. 2. If someone asked a question which touched on some fundamental limitation in C, and if onto an unsatisfying answer about the situation in C were added a postscript along the lines of "By the way, in Python you wouldn't have this problem at all, because...", then no, I would not necessarily object to that (and certainly not to the extent of lobbying for the answer's deletion). Sep 13 at 12:19
  • 1
    @Lundin I understand your point, but: Nine out of ten non Stack Overflow regulars believe that C and C++ have at least something to do with each other. If you rant too strenuously that they are wrong, and that you are here to properly educate them that C and C++ are two completely different languages, they are apt to write you off, and then you won't be able to educate them about anything at all. Sep 13 at 12:22
  • 1
    @SteveSummit And the other way around: if someone doesn't even know which programming language they are coding in, they are unlikely to ever produce a single working program, despite what they believe. Which could be why they came to SO with their "C/C++ problem" in the first place.
    – Lundin
    Sep 13 at 12:56
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    @Lundin: "if someone doesn't even know which programming language they are coding in, they are unlikely to ever produce a single working program" That's just objectively false. There are plenty of programmers who don't know or care about the distinction between C and C++ who are part of teams that actually ship products. Maybe they're not well-written products and are prone to bugs, but they do exist and they do ship code. Sep 13 at 18:11
  • 1
    @NicolBolas Yes there are plenty of companies producing awful, buggy products, who could benefit from having their employees participating on SO. Given that SO is factually correct and the posts here are on-topic, otherwise there's no point for them to bother and they might as well go watch some teen Youtube wannabe teaching programming after starting to learn it themselves yesterday.
    – Lundin
    Sep 14 at 6:35
22

Among the user moderator guidelines, this was added:

Maybe that was the problem, then. Not so much the desire, but more the expectation that it would actually be followed. It is a guideline, after all; people will follow it or not at their leisure.

But more to the point, expecting that people will want to downvote and delete content that helped them is expecting a lot. You might think that nobody who looks at that question could possibly be a C++ programmer. But that's not how most actual people who have a problem use the site.

Stack Overflow is working when you have a problem, you search for your problem online, and your search engine of choice leads you to a Stack Overflow answer that solves your problem. That means you never had to ask yet another version of this question. SO provided the solution indexed by the problem, your search engine pointed you to the SO solution when you searched for that problem.

That is the system working as intended.

Search engines do not care about our tags. And most people looking for a solution to a problem do not use SO's search engine to find them (because, among other things, it sucks). Tags are therefore primarily used by people who have a problem they could not find a solution for, or people who are looking for problems they can solve.

And it should be noted that SO works when nobody has to ask a question and nobody has to answer it. So, by definition, SO's tag mechanism is for when the system has failed. SO's tag mechanism is not what connects a person who has a problem to its solution.

It is entirely possible for a person working in C++ to have this problem. As such, finding a C++ solution is helpful to them. It is therefore entirely natural for them to consider that content useful and upvote it. Is it at all reasonable to expect a person who was helped by an answer to really care that it violated some rule tucked away on a wiki somewhere?

Broadly speaking, if something happens to get in the wrong place despite our best efforts to put it where it ought to go, search engines will sort it out.

Should this answer be there? No. Is this answer in the wrong place? Yes. Would it likely be downvoted and deleted if it were posted today? Sure. Is the presence of this answer so unpleasant to the site that significant effort should be expended to get rid of it?

No.

So, what is the procedure? There isn't one. A few people agreed to a set of guidelines, but they did so without the power to enforce them. When those guidelines run contrary to how users actually use the site, they will be ignored.

The "procedure" here should be to assess how practical the expectation that this guideline will be followed in every case will be. If it happens, it happens.

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    Our task is to make this site the best possible one. What search engines may or may not do and how relevant/irrelevant posts they come up with is a concern for the search engines.
    – Lundin
    Sep 13 at 6:21
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    "So, what is the procedure? There isn't one." One of the purposes of discussions on meta is to establish procedures and community consensus for how to deal with things. If there isn't one, then the whole purpose of this meta post is to establish one.
    – Lundin
    Sep 13 at 6:22
  • Stack Overflow is well-known enough that we might hope that search engines would invest the effort to make their search work better for us. I know Google already takes this into account when grouping and presenting results. With that in mind, we'd want our tags to be useful inputs to the search engines, and for that we should not have C++ answers under C tags. Now, it might be true it's not the case today, but this is a Meta question about the desired future, not the current state.
    – MSalters
    Sep 13 at 11:32
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    @Lundin And another of the purposes of discussions on meta is to ponder impossibly imponderable meta-questions such as, "Are we primarily here to help people, or are we primarily here to create an impeccably curated database which might, as a side effect, happen to help people? Is it more important to help people, or to follow the rules? If we find some helpful content which doesn't perfectly follow the rules, are we more inclined to retain it because it's helpful, or delete it because it doesn't follow the rules?" Sep 13 at 13:05
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    @SteveSummit If content is factually incorrect or off-topic, it is by definition not helpful. There's some post here on SO sitting at +50 score incorrectly teaching that strncpy is a safe version of strcpy for example. The casual reader has no reason to believe that it's wrong, so such posts keep on gaining score over time - with the voting system giving an incorrect/harmful post status, so that others might thing it's a good answer before even reading.
    – Lundin
    Sep 13 at 13:19
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    @Lundin: "If content is factually incorrect or off-topic, it is by definition not helpful." By what definition? SO's job is to provide solutions to problems. If a piece of content does that, then by that definition, it is helpful. My overall point is to explain just how pointless it is to quibble about these trivial things when the content does in fact help people and the problems it causes being in the wrong place aren't especially serious. We don't need a procedure to deal with small things like this, and obsessing over them is helping precisely nobody. Sep 13 at 13:43
  • @NicolBolas By the definition of common sense? Or good engineering practice? I realize there might be a cultural difference here between engineers and "developers". An engineer would find it very problematic to purposely ship a product with known problems, while a "developer" might be happy to ship anything that compiles as soon as they get paid and keep their boss happy. And so the software in your car works mostly fine without updates for a very long time, while the software in your PC/phone is a complete bugfest that has to be updated with patches 24/7 in order to function for the next day.
    – Lundin
    Sep 14 at 6:49
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    @Lundin: "I realize there might be a cultural difference here between engineers and "developers"." And I realize that any such "cultural difference" exists largely so that one group can disparage the other. Gatekeeping who gets to be considered an "engineer" and who's a mere "developer" is not SO's job. At the end of the day, the "problem" you have outlined is very trivial, only affects an increasingly small number of questions, and "fixing" it is not practical. Just move on already; stop trying to manicure the site in pointless ways. Sep 14 at 13:28
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    @Lundin: Again, this site is not for you to gatekeep the profession. We're not here to litigate some arbitrary demarcation between "real programmer" and "people who should just go away". Sep 14 at 13:57
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    @Lundin: But you don't get to have the power to decide for us who does and does not get to be called a "programmer". Your personal definition is irrelevant. If you are doing programming, you are a "programmer"; that's literally what the word means. Sep 14 at 14:14
  • 1
    @NicolBolas It isn't possible to do "programming in general". You have to do programming in a specific language. If you don't know which one, then how can you do programming? Similarly, you can't call yourself a translator if you don't know at least something of two spoken languages. And you kind of need to know which languages those are. You can't just "translate in general". This is no "personal definition", it's common sense.
    – Lundin
    Sep 14 at 14:28
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    @Lundin language agnostic questions are on topic and are programming by programmers. not sure what you're trying to say here.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 14 at 14:31
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    @Lundin: "If you don't know which one, then how can you do programming?" And yet they "do programming". And it is undeniable that they "do programming". So they are "programmers", even if they don't fully understand something you think is really important for a programmer to fully understand. Sep 14 at 14:32
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    @NicolBolas I'll keep that in mind when I post my next C/C++/C#/Java/Javascript question, which isn't going to get closed and down voted at all.
    – Lundin
    Sep 14 at 14:38
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    @Lundin: You don't seem to understand the difference between "is this appropriate" and "should we care all that much about this old, inappropriate thing." It is incorrect for the answer to be where it is. But we should not care at this point; the time for caring has long-since past. You have spent far more time talking about this issue than the actual harm it causes. New, inappropriate content can be dealt with. Old, inappropriate content is irrelevant. LET IT GO. Sep 14 at 14:39
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You, the non-OP, can't delete answers that are incorrect. Deletion really should be reserved as a nuclear option, since it indicates that the content of the post was so bad that we had no other recourse on hand but to nuke it from orbit.

What you, the non-OP can do is downvote the answer. The answer is incorrect and doesn't provide value, so downvoting is appropriate.

(It's also dramatically outmoded by the accepted answer anyway, so I really don't think anyone's going to come to harm from seeing that answer. And if they did, it isn't like they're going to be lost indefinitely.)

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    This is incorrect; at 20,000 reputation, users unlock the privilege to delete negatively-scored answers. At 178k reputation, OP has that privilege.
    – TylerH
    Sep 12 at 19:48
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    @TylerH: You interpret me too literally. Yes, you have the privilege of deleting negatively scored answers at 20k+ rep. But a negatively scored answer is not necessarily incorrect.
    – Makoto
    Sep 12 at 19:52
  • 7
    I didn't know you were only referring to deletion metaphorically. I don't see much point in that since OP is asking for literal instructions here, not metaphorical ones. That aside, the argument here is wrong. You should delete vote wrong answers, because they are almost always not useful which is the metric by which we determine whether content ought to stay around in the site or be deleted (usually after the metric of "is it on-topic"). Wrong code is not useful, ergo it has no value and shouldn't stay on the site. Letting it stay is sending the signal that it is useful.
    – TylerH
    Sep 12 at 19:56
  • 2
    @TylerH: The only guidance we've received when deleting answers is if the answer is extremely low quality, or if it's not an answer at all. It's not low quality - anyone who uses C++ may benefit from it - and it definitely is answer-shaped. Anything beyond that prescription smells like a misuse of the privilege. If you're concerned about signal of it being of use, then downvoting would be the right thing to do since it indicates that, even though this answer may be positively scored, it's much less positively scored if weighed against the other answers.
    – Makoto
    Sep 12 at 20:01
  • 3
    I find a C++-only answer to be an extremely low quality answer to a C question; it's beyond useless: it's misleading. I agree with you that downvoting such content is a correct action. However, I go one step further in keeping the quality of Stack Overflow high: if I downvote an answer, that means I think it's not useful (you know, what the tooltip says). And what do we do with things that are not useful? Remove them. What's the point in keeping something around that is not useful, is misleading, and can't ever be made useful or true without being completely rewritten as new answer?
    – TylerH
    Sep 12 at 20:43
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    @TylerH: As I said earlier, I find deletion by someone that isn't the original poster of the answer to be a nuclear option. In anecdotal experience, if I've come across wrong answers, downvoting was enough to get the OP to take action, including deleting it. My sentiment to this would probably counter yours: what's the harm in keeping it around, but scored negatively? Keeping question/answer quality high is altruistic, but there's only so much bubble wrap you can put around someone before they fall on their face. (That is to say, if someone picks a bad answer, not much you can do.)
    – Makoto
    Sep 12 at 21:33
  • 2
    @TylerH If you believe that an answer is not useful (for any reason), you should indeed downvote it. But others might upvote it, so we might keep it. The original meta-question here, though, is about answers which the OP believes are so not useful that he feels his one downvote is not enough; he wants us all to agree that even though an answer still has (say) +10 votes it is "blatantly incorrect" (perhaps even that it is "irrelevant/incorrect/harmful crap"), and then he wants some kind of new license to impose his opinion (as if it represents consensus) by prematurely deleting these answers. Sep 12 at 21:51
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    I sometimes find it informative to read wrong answers (along with all of the comments explaining why they are wrong), because if I was considering exploring that same wrong approach, I have now learned not only that the idea is incorrect, but the details about how and why it is incorrect, and potentially saved myself a good bit of time I might otherwise have wasted exploring a dead-end path by trial-and-error. Sep 12 at 23:50
  • 2
    stackoverflow.com/help/privileges/trusted-user "When should I vote to delete an answer? You may vote to delete answers in the following cases: - The answer is extremely low quality: There is little to no scope for improvement. - The answer doesn't attempt to answer the question; it may be a comment or a separate question altogether." In the kind of posts I'm talking about, both reasons apply. The answer is extremely low quality as in blatantly off-topic and cannot be fixed. And since it isn't about the listed topic, it does not attempt to answer the question.
    – Lundin
    Sep 13 at 6:17
  • 2
    @Makoto "What's the harm in keeping it around" I already mentioned that in my previous comment. It's useless and it's misleading people into thinking such a solution works for C when it only works for C++. Even if it were not misleading and were just useless (like a repeated answer), that also causes harm in the costs it incurs, both on the company for hosting it and on future readers whose time is spent at least scrolling past it and at most trying it out for themselves only to find it doesn't work (or worse in some cases, works partially but not in ways they don't realize).
    – TylerH
    Sep 13 at 14:00
  • 1
    @TylerH: Because someone isn't posting an answer to solve this problem in say Java or Lisp or Rust, for example. I would consider an answer in that vein to solve a C problem as extremely low quality. However I can envision a scenario in which a C++ programmer stumbles upon this and gets value from it. For your remark about wrong answers, well - the idea of Stack Overflow is to rank content, and right answers would rank higher, whereas wrong answers rank lower. So it's still the case that downvoting would address this concern.
    – Makoto
    Sep 13 at 15:58
  • 2
    @TylerH: I value the zeal you have for this cause but I remain convinced that answer deletion should only be used as a last resort when there is definitively absolutely no value at all, whatsoever, in any stretch of the imagination, even incidentally. I have my doubts that this meets that standard. But it's just my convention, and quite a few other people are already downvoting the answer to the threshold to get it to be deleted. This is why we can't have nice things.
    – Makoto
    Sep 13 at 16:00
  • 2
    @Makoto: No one cares that a programmer working with a different technology than the question was asked about may get value from the answer. If that were important, then all answers should be attached to all questions, site-wide. Clearly that way lies madness. The important consideration is whether the C programmer can learn something from "This is how it is done in C++." Many answers that explain how the C++ works, in a way that the C programmer could adopt (e.g. C is perfectly capable of having struct nonstd_vector_int { int* data; size_t size; };) can be informative and useful.
    – Ben Voigt
    Sep 13 at 18:03
  • 2
    The particular answer linked in the question, however, doesn't attempt to explain that C++ solves the problem by passing the data pointer and size around together. It just presents a cargo-cult incantation. And that is not even useful to C++ programmers. So downvote into oblivion.
    – Ben Voigt
    Sep 13 at 18:04
  • 2
    @SteveSummit Or maybe the reason is that people on meta always obsess and put all their energy on discussing some specific example, instead of having a general discussion about delete policies and procedures, which was the important part of my question. This is just one example, there are worse, there are less worse. Step 1) establish policies and procedures to establish what to do with blatantly off-topic posts. Step 2) have a discussion of the definition of what makes something off-topic. Step 3) look at specific examples.
    – Lundin
    Sep 14 at 9:22
-11

This is an interesting situation. Maybe the answer is to lock the question with a reason along the lines of "misleading answer". That would at least keep it around for those it does help but also have some indication that it's not 100% on the level (despite the upvotes).

3
  • 4
    The question isn't the problem. Locking the question only hurts the existing proper answers, as they cannot attract upvotes. Sep 14 at 22:45
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    A question shouldn't suffer just because someone posted a bad answer. These kind of high traffic posts that sometimes even obtain "canonical" status over time always attract a ton of late, bad answers. We have the ability to protect such posts, which blocks very low rep users from answering it. However, the main purpose of this is to block spammers.
    – Lundin
    Sep 15 at 6:50
  • 1
    There is also a specific answer lock, that leaves the question unlocked.
    – Marijn
    Sep 15 at 6:52

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