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I think it is an ongoing problem that too many trivial edits which don't fully address the issues in a post are proposed. Related to this is that many of these trivial edits are accepted by reviewers.

Currently, the edit rejection reasons don't make it obvious that edits which don't substantially improve a post should be rejected:

  • Reject

This edit fails to improve the post.

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Suggests that only edits which entirely fail to improve the post should be rejected.

Similarly, on the next level:

No Improvement

The edit does not improve the quality of the post. Changes to the content are unnecessary or make the post more confusing.

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The only relevant radio button implies that it should be clicked only if the edit fails to improve the quality of the post in any way, not only if it fails to substantially improve the quality of the post.

Should we have a stricter reason for rejecting such as 'This edit fails to substantially improve the post', to make it more obvious that trivial edits should be rejected?

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    If the edit is trivial (fixes a single typographical error for example), but doesn't address the rest of the problems (noise, formatting, other errors), then reject it as "No Improvement", as it has failed to improve the post. A single correction to what should be many isn't an improvement as the post is still in a poor condition. Much like putting a piece of paper of a hole in the wall isn't an "improvement" if there are still 5 other holes in that same wall.
    – Larnu
    Aug 31 at 15:35
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    @Larnu I can’t say I agree. Even a trivial edit improves the post, just not very much. Either way, I think it needs to be much more clear, since I suspect that many new reviewers wouldn’t see it in the same way as you have described.
    – user438383
    Aug 31 at 15:40
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    I don't see how fixing a single problem in the post improves it, when the rest of an unreadable mess, @user438383 .
    – Larnu
    Aug 31 at 15:42
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    @Larnu I think user438383 and you are on the same side on that matter - what the above comment (at least in how I read it) is saying is that it does, technically, improve something about the post, just not in a manner that is a good way of spending reviewer time on or use up a valuable queue slot in the first place. Aug 31 at 15:47
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    Perhaps, then, the rejection reason instead needs to read "... does not substantially improve..."
    – Larnu
    Aug 31 at 15:49
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    Don't believe everything you read on Meta. See the linked duplicates, perhaps, for more relevant reading? (Now, the caveat is, if the post is still literally an unreadable mess after the edit, then that's not an edit that is "too minor"; that's one that is completely pointless and ineffective. It should be rejected for no improvement whatsoever. But that's very different from edits that are merely polishing because there's almost nothing left to improve. Also, one reason why Meta previously was concerned about "too minor" edits was this, but that's fixed.)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 31 at 17:20
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    If you fix a bug in code, but there are still other bugs, does that bug fix not improve the code? Seriously, this is obvious stuff, so I'm going to assume that you're intentionally choosing to interpret the reason in a way that is consistent with that you wish it said, rather than what it actually does say.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 31 at 17:48
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    Perhaps the problem isn't the guidance for editors, it's the guidance for reviewers, @CodyGray . If we, as reviewers, can't apply the guidance for editors, then what guidance should we follow?
    – Larnu
    Aug 31 at 17:49
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    No one asked anyone to fix anything! Someone submitted a PR to your repository that fixed only one bug out of many. You're going to reject that PR because they didn't fix all of the problems? This is stupid. You cannot honestly believe this.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 31 at 17:50
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    And we, as reviewers, find it frustrating that someone has spent less than a second making a change to a post and us, as a reviewer, have to (by your standards) spend a couple minutes fixing the rest, and yet we, as the reviewer, get nothing bur they get 2 reputation. Now, don't get me wrong, I don't care about my reputation, but rewarding someone for no effort, and expecting reviewers to put it in is a poor stance, @CodyGray .
    – Larnu
    Aug 31 at 18:01
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    I disagree that it's not the editors fault that they didn't address the rest of the problems; I have no idea how you can think any other way. I suppose were back to I can only agree to disagree with you. Perhaps I'll raise my own post address my concerns/confusion about your responses here at a later point. For now, I'll avoid the edit review queue again (just after I'd finally recently decided to visit it again).
    – Larnu
    Aug 31 at 18:32
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    @CodyGray that's strange to hear from you, actually. The community guidance was and, IIRC, still is that edits that do not fix other problems with the post are bad edits (meaning they go against the guidelines for making good edits) which is certainly grounds for rejection. Even with the current wording, "superfluous" supports the idea of such edits (like "fixing" grammar in an unsalvageable post) being generally a waste of everyone's time. I do understand that the argument for wasting reviewer time should probably be avoided as the content should be assessed by its merits alone, but [1/2] Aug 31 at 18:51
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    [2/2] the content is precisely what's in question for such edits. Granted, there is no need to reject incomplete edits just for being, well, incomplete - we are only human, after all. But when an edit misses glaring issues with a given post focusing instead on adding a couple of commas, I'd say such an edit is a textbook "unnecessary" one. P.S. in the [1/2] part, the opening statement should read "hear that" :) Aug 31 at 18:56
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    The irony that the accepted answer on "Too minor" edits - better to leave poor quality on the site? states that one of the reasons that minor edits are ok is because the suggested edit queue is always empty is somewhat laughable now; when the opposite is true and it is rarely not full.
    – Larnu
    Aug 31 at 21:22
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    I agree with Larnu ("...frustrating that someone has spent less than a second making a change to a post and us, as a reviewer, have to ... spend a couple of minutes fixing the rest"). Better stay away from the edit suggestion queue altogether when less than 20% of the required work has been done for the average edit suggestion. Sep 1 at 14:43

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