31

I recently asked this question about questions with [python-*] tags, but no tag. Adding the tag to all of the 200,000 or so questions in this category is not possible, so here's another solution (original comment by MisterMiyagi):

(Note: I only counted the questions which did not have the target tag)

As commented by zcoop98, adding the minor version number is not helpful as a tag, and should instead be included in the body of the question, or in the title.

The difference between Python 2 and Python 3 is significant enough to warrant their own tags, but the changes made in minor versions are not.

This would also help watchers like me, as it is easier to just watch and than to watch all the minor versions as well.

17
  • 8
    Not to take away from the merit of actually implementing something like this, but to address your last paragraph about the difficulty of watching all the minor versions, it is worth noting that you can use wildcards in both favorite tags and tag searches. So, you can search for [python*] and get all tags that start with "python". (Which, incidentally, does highlight that, for the version-specific tags that are kept, there is a significant importance in ensuring that they follow a standard pattern. The Python tags already do, luckily. Surely not by accident.)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 30 at 10:59
  • 9
    @CodyGray that would also add anything prefixed with python that isn't a version and such tags overshadow version tags by a lot. So no, there's no equivalence here.
    – Braiam
    Aug 30 at 11:06
  • 7
    Right, OK. You might need to get a bit more clever (not all that clever) and do something like [python-3*].
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 30 at 11:08
  • 5
    "The difference between Python 2 and Python 3 is significant enough to warrant their own tags" the purpose of the tags is not to tell if there's any difference (example, we do not have html or js tags for versions of the specifications) but if those are enough to be their own topic altogether that someone answering one would have no idea how to answer the other. They are rarely necessary and a pain to maintain. I suppose it would take another 5 years to finally come around and remove those two too.
    – Braiam
    Aug 30 at 11:08
  • 2
    @CodyGray the point is that if you are doing that, you are doing it wrong. You should be searching for features or problems, not versions.
    – Braiam
    Aug 30 at 11:09
  • 13
    but the changes made in minor versions are not - I disagree. For example - look at the differences in how async stuff can be done between 3.4 - 3.6...
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Aug 30 at 11:31
  • 14
    @JonClements - but we don't need a separate tag for each minor version. The OP can just add I'm using Python [version] into the question. People are tagging their questions with, for example, [python-3.5] and not tagging it with [python] (they see the version tag as a replacement to the master tag) - meaning answerers who just watch [python] don't see that question.
    – The Thonnu
    Aug 30 at 11:34
  • 6
    Well... the tag guidance does say: The version of the Python programming language released on September 13, 2015. For issues that are specific to Python 3.5. Use the more generic [python] and [python-3.x] tags where possible.... So one option would be to re-word that to always say to include [python]...
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Aug 30 at 11:37
  • 3
    @JonClements - I doubt that would do much, as despite the tag guidance there are still over 300,000 questions tagged with [python-3.*] and neither [python] nor [python-3.x]
    – The Thonnu
    Aug 30 at 11:43
  • 6
    Indeed - who actually bothers reading tag info? :p However, I think syn'ing everything actually loses value and accessibility though. Something with a specific version tag is easier to specifically identify/filter on and/or add remove if needed to a post without scanning text for a version etc...
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Aug 30 at 11:47
  • 6
    Although I do agree the version tags are misused frequently, they are still somewhat useful. I'd prefer this not be done currently and be revisited later once the Version Labels feature is implemented. Aug 30 at 12:58
  • 10
    @JonClements As far as I can tell, nobody reads tag guidance. I see tagging that blatantly contradicts the tag guidance, constantly. To the extent that that doesn't happen, it's only because the tags are sufficiently intuitive. But there are, for example, a huge number of questions in design-patterns that are "please help me with my homework assignment to output a pretty pattern of asterisks/digit symbols at the terminal". Aug 31 at 4:47
  • 1
    In Stack Overflow en español we have a warning saying something like Use [python] for all the questions related to Python. If you think the question is specific to a certain version, do use also a tag like [python-2.x] or [python-3.x]... See the Meta post where this was requested and implemented.
    – fedorqui
    Sep 1 at 14:10
  • 3
    A complementary issue is the large number of old Python questions & answers that were written when Py 2 was dominant and which have no python-2* tag. Some of that info is still applicable to Py 3, perhaps with minor changes (like using the print function instead of the print statement, and input vs raw_input), but some of it is now obsolete, sub-optimal, or plain wrong. I suppose we can just advise newbies to avoid old Python questions, but that's complicated by the fact that many old Py 2 questions are popular dupe targets.
    – PM 2Ring
    Sep 1 at 16:18
  • 1
    Minor version tags are theoretically useful for "Why does my code work in 3.x but not in 3.y?" questions. However, it's clear that a lot of questions with minor-version tags don't really need to have them.
    – dan04
    Sep 1 at 21:44

2 Answers 2

15

Implement tag hierarchies instead.

The problem that you're getting at is easier solved with a tag hierarchy.

Then you would just tag the version that is most applicable to your question and

If you can structure it as a tree and it's not already a tree, you're probably solving someone's problem.

3
  • 6
    Or even just improve the broken tag system. The tagging system doesn't do a good job guiding users and it needs to be rethought.
    – Machavity Mod
    Sep 1 at 20:09
  • 1
    A very similar proposal was made already in 2010 on meta.SE
    – Adriaan
    Sep 2 at 8:34
  • 2
    @Adriaan IMO, that proposal is trying to use a hierarchy for way to much. It would already be really helpful (for this question and in general) if there was a way to express that a tag 100%, without a doubt, implies another tag. If there is any ambiguity, don't connect the tags. But you can't ask a question about python3.10 without asking a question about python.
    – MegaIng
    Sep 2 at 13:37
-7

The difference between Python 2 and Python 3 is significant enough to warrant their own tags, but the changes made in minor versions are not.

This sentence is plainly incorrect, especially in the context of Python 2. Even if we ignore any library changes and only look at new syntax between 2.5 and 2.7, there's generator expressions, the with statement, the ternary operator, unified try blocks (you could not use finally together with except before 2.5!), set literals, and much more. I would say for most questions the difference between 2.4 and 2.7 is bigger than 2.7 to 3.x.

I concede that the specific version doesn't matter for a lot of trivial questions. However, in these cases the python2/3 tags do not matter either - you can answer many basic questions with version-ambiguous code that runs on 2 and 3. However, the tags do matter for more complex questions which might benefit from advanced language features, or if OP is stuck with an old version where certain basic features (e.g. dict comprehensions) cannot be used.

For reference, I once had to edit my answer to a python question 3 times because it turned out OP was using the bundled jython 2.1 on IBM WebSphere. I'm not sure how long ago that was but IIRC jython 2.7 was already a thing. In that specific case, OP was unaware that it was a really old version, but a 2.1 tag on that question would have been tremendously helpful.

TLDR, the tags are useful if used correctly, so I don't like your suggestion of synonymising them to the 2/3.x tags. Optimally, all questions should have the generic python tag and add a version specific tag only if required. That's obviously not what happened, but removing the ability to disambiguate the versions is IMO not a good way to solve this.


This answer is way more contentious than assumed - potentially because it's mainly a rebuke of an argument for consolidation and offers no alternative ideas. Here's my personal take on how it could be cleaned up if a cleanup should be deemed necessary:

  • Synonymize 2.7 to 2.x. That should be the default assumption for python 2 in most cases, and removes 95% of the tag volume for python2.
  • Leave the other 2.x tags alone because they are useful to disambiguate older versions. If someone wants to ask a new question about 2.5, tagging as 2.5 is extremely helpful for answerers.
  • I don't really care what you do with the 3.n tags. There's a few new syntax constructs (e.g. the 3.10 match/case statements) but these are IMO less impactful for most questions than the changes in the 2.n updates. Furthermore many of those features are new enough that most people would still prefix an answer with a disclaimer it only works in version x and up (e.g. 3.10 for case).
32
  • 5
    I think your Jython example actually highlights the opposite of what you want. Jython 2.7 is not fully compliant with Python 2.7 and incompatible with many libraries, so the minor version tag still is usually not sufficient for these situations. Just like the OP in your case, askers are usually not aware of such differences and could not select accurate tags even if we had/kept them. Aug 30 at 12:25
  • 7
    "the tags do matter for more complex questions which might benefit from advanced language features" how common are those extreme examples? Are those questions being underserved if there's only one tag for them? Also, how are askers supposed to know when they are relevant? By the time people answers the question is already too late anyways.
    – Braiam
    Aug 30 at 12:33
  • 3
    (BTW, and putting yourself as example, out of 111 answers to python tagged questions, only 1 that you can recall where the tag could be arguably useful if the asker knew it is relevant)
    – Braiam
    Aug 30 at 12:35
  • 7
    @l4mpi That seems to be turning your own argument on its head. Your point is that the answerer benefits from the tags to know what can be used. But, say, a Python 2.7 tag would not tell anyone that a statistics question cannot be solved using NumPy because it's secretly a Jython question. Aug 30 at 12:43
  • 2
    @l4mpi and that's relevant for me as a reader how? I can see how that could be relevant for answerers, but as an answerer, I should consider that before answering the question anyways (ie. my answer should be generic enough that it covers 98% of potential cases). Also, did you remove the 2.6 version of your answer just because the asker was using 2.1? Personally, I wouldn't.
    – Braiam
    Aug 30 at 12:54
  • 2
    Again, why should I care as a reader about that? If I'm using ibm websphere version of python and I know that "ibm websphere" is relevant I would already include that in my query to search for information. If I don't find anything and am forced to ask, I would be damn sure to include that on the body of the question. In all those cases the tag wouldn't help me if I don't know what I should know. So, I ask again, when are those tag useful for the people that do not know the answer already?
    – Braiam
    Aug 30 at 21:30
  • 6
    @EricDuminil Because systems running Python 2.5 still exist. LTS and legacy systems don't care about "unsupported" (yes, there's some irony for the former). Aug 31 at 8:01
  • 1
    @Braiam you seem to misunderstand the websphere thing; it bundles a specific jython version and is not otherwise relevant (I know zero about it but was able to answer the q). Also, you focus on a reader (so, someone using SO to find existing solutions?) but for the reader no tag is relevant as long as they land on the right post via google. "Tags help connect experts with questions they will be able to answer" - and an expert would very much like to know if they're supposed to write code compliant with a recent python 3, or 2.7, 2.5 or earlier.
    – l4mpi
    Aug 31 at 9:04
  • 2
    @l4mpi no, I don't care what version the answer is writer for. I care if the answer works for me and my use case. If there's an indication that the answer wouldn't work for me (ie. something like "for versions later than 2.6 use this instead") that would be another thing, but still the onus of the answerer to tell that to their readers. I write all my answers with the express purpose that anyone reading it, would be useful for them. You don't do that too? Writing for all potential implementations?
    – Braiam
    Aug 31 at 10:29
  • 2
    @Braiam "for all potential implementations" - lol no. First, there's a difference between "useful" and "optimal" or even "good". You can write python 2.1 code for reading files and use it in 3.11, but to do so would be a bad idea because you deprive yourself of context managers etc. To write "good" answers for all reasonably-used python versions (which includes at least 2.5 due to LTS linux / unix versions) would be a big hassle. Same the other way around - if it's clear the question is about python2 (or e.g. jython which has no 3.x), answering with 3.x features is not useful.
    – l4mpi
    Aug 31 at 10:52
  • 6
    @Braiam and again, you have not answered why a 2.n tag is an issue for you as a reader. If you don't care, nice, just ignore it. Don't deprive people of the ability to use it to make clear their question is about that specific version only.
    – l4mpi
    Aug 31 at 10:53
  • 3
    @Braiam looking at your SO profile you hardly seem to provice any answers to python questions, and none follow your described approach. But it would not be useful in the first place. E.g. if the Q is how to read a named field from a CSV, writing four answers, one using with and DictReader for 2.7+, another working around the DictReader bugs in 2.6, a third for 2.5(?) where DictReader didn't exist, and one without the with statement for <=2.4, seems like a bad idea. As does writing answers without dict comprehensions (2.7+ only) unless OP specifies they're on 2.6 or lower.
    – l4mpi
    Aug 31 at 15:03
  • 6
    @Braiam and I repeat myself, but you still have not answered how the python-2.n tags negatively affect you in any way.
    – l4mpi
    Aug 31 at 15:05
  • 6
    FWIW, I do agree that minor version differences themselves are not insignificant. However, I would question whether tags are appropriate to provide this information. There are several things for which the information may be relevant (interpreter implementation and version, platform, dependencies, ...) but: the asker usually does not know which ones are actually relevant without knowing the answer already, and in sum these are too many to cram into tags (for example, just python+python-2.7+jython+websphere are four of the five tags allowed). Sep 1 at 7:03
  • 3
    I agree with this answer: the difference between Python pre 2.7 and Python 2.7 is almost as significant as the jump from Python 2.x to Python 3. It's not just a step increment. And legacy systems are a fact of life. Keeping a tag distinction between Python 2.x and Python 3.x, but removing the distinction between pre and post 2.7 would be inconsistent. Sep 1 at 7:48

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .