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I lost 35 reputation points received on an answer to a question posted by a deleted user. For an established SO user this is not much, but I am relatively new and reputation points do provide incentive for investing time in answers. Any new or low-reputation users are more likely (I do not know to what extent, but I was de-facto penalized for 45 points due to two deleted users just this month) to be deleted.

Now, I accept as reasonable when points are taken on questions/answers not related to the deleted user. After all, efforts, invested in such questions, are not related to the deleted user. I might still not like it, but I accept it.

But so long as my own reputation is relatively low and individual answer points count and provide an incentive for me, the established policy of total cancellation of all points related to a deleted user acts as a strong disincentive to answering questions asked by new and low-reputation users.

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    We don't do what you're describing. Answers to deleted users' questions still keep all the reputation gained for answering them, unless the question (or the answer) is deleted.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 26 at 5:56
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    Are you talking about deleted users or deleted questions? Did you see a change in your reputation history saying "user was removed"? Aug 26 at 5:56
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    I figured it out: this question was deleted because it was negatively scored and the user self-deleted their account.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 26 at 5:57
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    The user didn't self-delete that one, @RyanM. It was deleted automatically when the account was deleted/destroyed because it had a negative score.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 26 at 5:57
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    @CodyGray I meant that they self-deleted their account (edited to clarify)
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 26 at 5:58
  • Well, the reputation log says "User was removed" for 20 lost points. The other 25 indicate a question.
    – PChemGuy
    Aug 26 at 5:58
  • "the established policy of total cancellation of all points related to a deleted user acts as a strong disincentive to answering questions asked by new and low-reputation users" - this is not necessarily a bad thing though. We don't need many answers, only good ones. If it slows down people who might not know yet what makes a good answer (because almost nobody tries to find out when signing up...), that might just be a blessing in disguise.
    – Gimby
    Aug 29 at 7:28
  • OK, that is a valid point.
    – PChemGuy
    Aug 29 at 8:31
  • Obviously, community does not like this question. But I cannot delete it because it has an answer, right?
    – PChemGuy
    Aug 29 at 8:36
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    On meta people generally use a downvote to say "no/wrong/disagree", rather than the post receiving dozens of comments stating that - it is the less disruptive way. To see how valuable the meta post is, judge the overall engagement with it. A downvoted question on meta can still hold great value. I see plenty of votes both up and down, I see comments, I see a nice answer which is well-received. No good meta post, no worries.
    – Gimby
    Aug 29 at 14:17

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Are you asking why you don't keep reputation for content that is no longer visible (e.g., answers to questions where the question itself has been deleted)? I think the answer to that should be obvious: reputation is given in recognition for useful contributions. If no one can see it, did you make a useful contribution to the site? No.

If the issue is that someone deleted a suitable question with useful answers, then that's a different story. Flag the question for moderator attention, make that point, and request that it be undeleted. Some users who don't understand how a Q&A site works (specifically, that we are building a reference library of high-quality answers to programming questions) think that it's OK to delete their question after they've received an answer. It isn't, and moderators will happily reverse that incorrect action. But please don't abuse this by flagging low-quality content for undeletion. There's naturally some subjectivity here, so let your conscience be your guide, but recognize that we don't want to shoot ourselves in the foot by undeleting stuff that was incorrectly deleted (procedurally speaking) but isn't actually worth having visible (functionally speaking).

If you're struggling with the fact that you keep answering low-quality questions that ultimately get closed and deleted, which is causing you to lose any reputation you've gained, well, this is what we call an educational moment. :-) Stop doing that; spend your time and effort on higher-quality questions that deserve the attention. If you recognize a question as the type that will probably be closed and deleted, flag it for the appropriate reason instead of answering it. Similarly, if a question seems simple, it is very likely a duplicate (considering Stack Overflow has been answering programming questions for 10+ years now), so you'd be better served by going to find the existing canonical Q&A on that subject and flagging the new one as a duplicate, rather than posting a new answer.

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