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Earlier today, I posted a question in relation to a weird error I'm getting. A few hours later, I came back and discovered that someone had edited it to "remove unneeded exposition and improve readability." I want to stress that some of what the user changed was reasonable (in terms of changing a "code" block to a "block quote" instead, however I felt that "removing unneeded exposition" was outside the scope of what a good edit should be. If an edit improves a question by adding specific detail to the question so it is easier to answer, that's one thing, but if an edit is being done simply because "I-don't-like-the-way-that-user-writes" then it's going too far.

So, I reverted the edit.

Next thing I know, the question is downvoted (likely by the same person) and has a "close" vote, with the reason as "needs detail or clarity".

So, here is my question - in multiple parts.

A) Does SO have a published "edit etiquette" anywhere? I have looked for one and can't find it.

B) Do users abuse the "downvote" and "close vote" options, and what suggestions are there to prevent this kind of abuse?

The way I see it, editing something simply because you don't like the user's writing style is taking something with the author's own personality away from them. For example, I have a conversational and informal tone in my writing. By taking that tone out of my questions, I'm being turned into someone I'm not.

We're not robots, after all, we're all people - so why shouldn't we be permitted some leeway in the area of personality?

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  • 24
    Please don't assume that the person editing was also the downvoter/close voter, there's no way of knowing that.
    – user438383
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:19
  • 11
    further, try and see SO more like Wikipedia and less like a forum. Posts should be as clear as possible, and chatty/informal language makes posts less useful. Would you want a Wikipedia article to show the personality of the author? Probably not.
    – user438383
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:21
  • 9
    "Do users abuse the "downvote" and "close vote" options, and what suggestions are there to prevent this kind of abuse?" How is that related to the topic?
    – Dharman Mod
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:22
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    Lastly please don't edit my questions by posting your question you are basically singing off permission for people to edit it. You can't ask people not to edit.
    – user438383
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:22
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    If you want to ask about downvote/close vote abuse then I think you should create a new question on Meta. This question is about editing etiquette, not about voting abuse.
    – Dharman Mod
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:27
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    @StevenC.Britton downvotes on Meta are more like votes on whether they agree with the premise of your question - these discussions are good to have, so I wouldn't be disheartened. But meta can be slightly unforgiving because it's usually the people with the highest standards who care most about the health of the site who are here.
    – user438383
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:36
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    I rolled back your recent edit to this question. Please do not make such edits in the future
    – Dharman Mod
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:39
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    @ StevenC.Britton Last thing - don't be offended if someone edits your post. If I edit a post, it's usually because I think it would be useful if improved. In a way, you should be grateful people are editing your posts - people are trying to improve it and improve your chances of getting a good answer. Editing usually costs a lot of money in the real world and people here are doing it for free....
    – user438383
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:40
  • 11
    You can't delete the question. That would be counterproductive. 3 people have already answered it.
    – Dharman Mod
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:41
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    @StevenC.Britton: Your question is fine and pretty typical for someone to ask when encountering an issue with edits. It's just that we disagree with your perspective on it. Doesn't make this a bad question or you a bad person.
    – Makoto
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:41
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    Downvotes on meta dont count towards your rep.
    – user438383
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:43
  • 4
    Now, if you still want to improve this question, removing the conflation with downvotes/close voted would help. Questions should stick to one concern. Aug 15, 2022 at 20:43
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    By the way, it is also false that less reputation equates to less visibility of the respective author's posts. That is more of a reflection of the posts' scores. Aug 15, 2022 at 20:45
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    Just FYI: Voting on any of the Meta sites is different than on main sites. On Meta sites, like this one, votes much more strongly represent people's agreement or disagreement with the position expressed in the post, rather than just an expression of people's opinion of the quality of the post, although votes can also reflect that. As a consequence, downvotes on Meta should not be automatically considered to mean there are problems with the post. On the other hand, it doesn't hurt to double-check that the post quality is good. As mentioned, votes on child meta sites don't affect reputation.
    – Makyen Mod
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:55
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    Even though there's very little tangible effect from voting on child meta sites, it's still not pleasant to get downvotes for most people. We're social creatures by both nature and nurture. Just having people express disapproval of us or our works is something which most people find unpleasant to varying degrees. That, however, shouldn't prevent other people from voting, as voting is a critical part of how the sites work. Without voting, we'd have no way to gauge how good/useful a post is (main and meta sites) or how much agreement/disagreement there is with a position (meta sites).
    – Makyen Mod
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:57

4 Answers 4

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In general the kinds of editing permitted are listed under edit privileges

Having said that we do edit posts to remove text that adds nothing to the question i.e. if the question reads the same without that text then it doesn't need to be in the question. Commonly that reasoning is used to remove things like "Thanks in advance"

So, I guess my question comes down to this

Falls into that category. We don't need it to make sense of the question and it adds no relevant information so if we're editing the question it's something we should remove. Think of us like Wikipedia, i.e. we're not here to have a chat in a Question or an Answer.

The other change simply fixes the code formatting so that seems useful too.

In short the edit seems positive and rolling it back was really not the right thing to do.


For up or down voting, vote however you wish provided you don't target anyone.


For close voting

  1. you have to provide a reason. You'll see that reason if the post ends up closed.
  2. others have to agree with you otherwise (excepting close as a duplicate) nothing happens. Therefore one close vote is nothing to worry about.
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  • And as I said in the original post - some of the edits were reasonable. The code formatting is a prime example of a reasonable edit. Any other edits, I would argue, should be discussed in the comment section before being applied, since that way it gives the OP a chance to discuss it with whoever is suggesting the change. I wouldn't take something you've written and change it without discussing it with you first - even here on SO, and I think it's reasonable to expect the same courtesy to be extended to me. I don't believe I'm being overly sensitive here, either. Aug 15, 2022 at 20:52
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    I'm afraid you'll have to get used to that not being the way these sites work. Why ask what the etiquette is if when we tell you, you simply want to ignore it? Instead, you could just chalk this up as a learning experience and therefore have your next post not run into these issues. Aug 15, 2022 at 20:55
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    I think most people who post and run into downvotes just end up leaving and not bothering to return. I'm engaging and challenging the responses I'm getting because when I run into information/responses that are different than what I expected, challenging them is my way of fleshing them out and determining if I do need to re-think my position. So take it as a positive that I'm replying as much as I am here, because it means I'm thinking this through. Aug 15, 2022 at 21:06
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    @StevenC.Britton - Instead of fixing the issues with the question, you decided to delete it, which is equally frustrating to the community than just receiving downvotes without a comment. I would argue that most people who leave, if they receive a downvote to their question, likely were never going to stay. They were only interested in receiving their answer, if they had been interested in staying, they wouldn't delete their question or leave without ever trying to edit their question to meet the quality standards that make SO great. Aug 16, 2022 at 15:35
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Time to be direct.

It is not your place to claim that others cannot edit your post. If the edit introduced malicious intent or language which was orthogonal to the post, you could revert and flag for a moderator.

Editing for readability is just fine. Not wanting to have to scroll to see an error message improves the readability of the post, and doesn't take anything away from it, and that's all I can see that the edit did.

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  • I disagree with you here somewhat. As I said in the original question, some of what the user did was reasonable, in my view, and some of it wasn't. Taking out "unneeded" exposition was beyond what I believed was reasonable. Aug 15, 2022 at 20:28
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    @StevenC.Britton: The point of you posting your question is to get an answer. Does the edit to your post then detract from that?
    – Makoto
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:29
  • That maybe your assessment of the situation, and that's fine, but there's always going to be a subjective aspect to the issue as well. Aug 15, 2022 at 20:33
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    @StevenC.Britton: No, there is absolutely no subjectivity. Edits exist to improve the quality of the question and answer, and anything in the question or answer that is not directly related to the subject at hand is ripe to be removed.
    – Makoto
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:36
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    @StevenC.Britton "there's always going to be a subjective aspect to the issue as well." can you in good consciousness claim that "So, I guess my question comes down to this" is subjectively crucial part of understanding the question? Or that attaching an emotional qualifier ("stupid error") is?
    – VLAZ
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:42
  • I think you meant "objectively" rather than "subjectively", and first, "So I guess my question comes down to this" is a way of indicating that the reader has reached the summary of the question. In that way, yes, it adds to the question in that it helps with the reader's flow. As for the emotional qualifier, "stupid", first, I've seen numerous questions where people have added statements of frustration or annoyance in their questions on SO without them being edited/commented/attacked, and second, as the program builds and runs just fine, it is objectively stupid. Aug 15, 2022 at 21:00
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    @StevenC.Britton that we don't have time to edit, nor have we likely even noticed every question that has an emotional qualifier is not evidence that we're OK with them. If you see such things you're welcome to join us in editing them out. Aug 15, 2022 at 21:19
  • I think I'll just go back to lurking and searching for answers to questions posed by others. 90% of the time, my question has been asked and answered by someone else anyway. Aug 15, 2022 at 21:20
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    @StevenC.Britton - Youv'e just pointed out why we feel so sure of our position as curators. The point of applying certain quality standards to posts via votes and edits is exactly what you just said: to make it easy for others to find answers without even needing to ask! Aug 15, 2022 at 21:48
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however I felt that "removing unneeded exposition" was outside the scope of what a good edit should be.

This is: considered incorrect on the Stack Exchange network; contrary to Stack Overflow policy as a result; and not (to any meaningful extent) up for debate. Questions on Stack Overflow are about the code, not the person writing the question. They are only about actions taken by the asker before asking, insofar as that helps to understand the question (e.g. "doing things the obvious way is unacceptable here because of such and such an external constraint"; or "I can't just fix the code that produced this poorly formatted data because it's proprietary"; or "my research told me XYZ but I specifically don't understand how Y relates to XZ"; etc.).

if an edit is being done simply because "I-don't-like-the-way-that-user-writes"

I'm pretty sure that effectively nobody actually thinks of editing decisions in those terms. The primary reason for not liking someone else's writing style is finding it unclear. Questions on Stack Overflow are supposed to be clear. Lack of clarity is explicitly listed as both a reason to downvote and a reason to close.

Citing the first paragraph from the tour: "Stack Overflow is a question and answer site... we're working together to build a library...." [emphasis mine]

Stack Overflow is, in other words, not a discussion forum. Questions are written so that other people with the same (or a sufficiently similar) problem can read them and verify that they have found the right question; and so that people who are trying to learn can focus on the question, as an introduction to the material, rather than having to put effort into reading it.

Libraries contain novels, not diaries.

editing something simply because you don't like the user's writing style is taking something with the author's own personality away from them

Yes.

This is a good thing.

Stack Overflow is not about expressing one's personality. It is about understanding and knowledge. (We do, of course, still expect courtesy - what we used to call "being nice", and what is now covered in the code of conduct.)

Personality is for discussion forums. Stack Overflow is, again, not one of those.

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I am not going to link to an official statement and don't take it as one, but my personal opinion would be summarized in the following words:

Don't do harm!

Everyone is free to edit. Users with more than 2000 reputation point are even trusted to do it without supervision. We should all have a common goal: to better the overall repository of information. If you think that the author's writing style is bad for the content, why shouldn't you change it? If you think the code example provided is inadequate, why not edit with your own?

As long as you don't change the meaning or make it worse, then what's the harm in editing a post?

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  • Because writing is a very personal thing to many people, and when you change the text of what is written beyond clarifying the information they're providing, then you're changing the user's base personality. Aug 15, 2022 at 20:31
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    @StevenC.Britton SO is about providing high quality questions and answers to help programmers, not to show your personality. There are lots of places where you can do that, just here isn't really one of then (in SO posts at least). (I mean obviously you can show your personality by being really helpful or being great at explaining stuff, just not in your writing style.)
    – user438383
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:32
  • And again, the question itself was perfectly fine as originally written. The changes made were subjective. Wouldn't it be better to discuss possible revisions in the comments first? Aug 15, 2022 at 20:34
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    generally, no, that'd result in less edits and more arguments.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:35
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    Your posts on Stack Overflow should not be a personal thing. You are not writing a diary or making posts on Facebook. You are sharing knowledge with the world. Every post is a donation of your knowledge to Stack Overflow and others are free to do with it what they think is right.
    – Dharman Mod
    Aug 15, 2022 at 20:35
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    @StevenC.Britton Writing style is certainly a way to express your personality, but please also consider that people use their free time reading your question and trying to help you. Is being able to express your personality worth the additional time you take away from these volunteers? Aug 15, 2022 at 20:38
  • Does it take much longer to read a post with a line that says something like "so it boils down to this" than one that doesn't? I think that's quite unlikely. Aug 15, 2022 at 21:08
  • KevinB I don't agree with you. I would rather someone politely comment on a post suggesting an edit to make the substance (not style) first. Then the author and commenter can discuss and settle on an appropriate conclusion. If it gets nasty, then the comments can get flagged for review. Aug 15, 2022 at 21:10
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    @StevenC.Britton - With all due respect, your reaction to the votes to this question, has not been the greatest. Unreasonable reactions to reasonable and justified downvotes, is one of the many reasons most users don't attempt to explain their downvote. While you have not been rude, you also have been extremely argumentative, despite numerous people all saying very similar things about the fact the edit your question received was justified and is even encouraged. Aug 16, 2022 at 15:33

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