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A Stack Exchange rule is explicitly telling:

Avoid inserting tags into titles in any of the following formats:

  • [tag]: [question title]

But there are lots of questions which are using this pattern for auto-generated errors Like these high scored questions:

  • Sass Loader Error: Invalid options object that does not match the API schema
  • Error: 'node-sass' version 5.0.0 is incompatible with ^4.0.0
  • Config Error: This configuration section cannot be used at this path
  • fatal error: Python.h: No such file or directory
  • MySQL error code: 1175 during UPDATE in MySQL Workbench
  • Error java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: GC overhead limit exceeded
  • Xcode 10 Error: Multiple commands produce
  • Error: Can't set headers after they are sent to the client
  • error: Unable to find vcvarsall.bat
  • Error message "No exports were found that match the constraint contract name"

Do auto-generated errors make this an exception to the rule?

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  • 14
    These appear to be copying the exact error message, as it is generated by the tool. It is not done for readability. You should not, in general, add "Error:" to the beginning of titles of Stack Overflow questions.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 14 at 8:35
  • 1
    @CodyGray How can one distinguish between a generated one and an added one? For any of the above questions, the asker can add it himself. So in general should we edit these questions? Aug 14 at 8:40
  • 14
    "How can one distinguish between a generated one and an added one?" 1. If you're familiar with the technology, you would probably know or can find out easily. 2. If the body of the question quotes the error message then it would be obvious if it's the same as the title. 3. In most cases you can research online find if this is indeed the message or there there is something tacked on.
    – VLAZ
    Aug 14 at 9:55
  • 4
    In my experience, those who just dump the error in the title haven't done much research; normally another question with almost exactly the same error (with different object names, etc) exists. The title ideally should help define the problem you are trying to solve, not the error (which should included in the question).
    – Larnu
    Aug 14 at 10:14
  • 2
    "The title ideally should help define the problem you are trying to solve, not the error" @Larnu I'm not sure I would always agree: if I am searching for how to fix some exception I want to see the machine-generated message in the title rather than having to open the Q&A to find out if it deals with my specific error. Aug 14 at 12:46
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    The "How to ...?" form is broken English (or infantilised English). Either drop the question mark or use QUASM. Aug 14 at 13:14
  • 1
    Apart from, as I stated @snakecharmerb , the vast majority of errors already have a question for that error; having more with just the error in the ttitle just bloats the results with low quality content. For example, I lose track of how many times I see the "Subquery returned more than 1 value" error as a title with nothing else as a question; and the reason they are just dumping the error in the title is because they didn't bother to research.
    – Larnu
    Aug 14 at 13:59
  • 3
    @PeterMortensen "How to" is perfectly normal as a heading.
    – philipxy
    Aug 14 at 18:47
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    @CodyGray Thank you all, I've updated the question Aug 21 at 3:38
  • These are verbatim error messages, not tags, so I am not sure what the quoted rule has to do with this. Can you clarify perhaps? Aug 22 at 7:24
  • @MisterMiyagi In the first place: These tags are valid on StackOverflow: sass-loader, configuration, fatal-error, mysql, java.lang, out-of-memory, etc. In addition, the pattern and keywords are the ones that lead people to ask different questions on Stackoverflow. Aug 23 at 3:41

2 Answers 2

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When I'm making titles for questions that have a clearly defined message, I put them in quotes, ie. No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource—when trying to get data from a REST API. Note, that many times for the future reader purpose I put the message first, since that's what search engines show, avoiding stuff like:

enter image description here

Preferring these kinds:

enter image description here

(note the later image ranks higher on my search engine for that error message despite both being different questions dealing with different stuff)

So, if the message says "error", while not helpful, it's what people would search for.

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  • 1
    "Note, that many times for the future reader purpose I put the message first" - that's a really good one. That is a worthwhile thing to look out for when editing posts.
    – Gimby
    Aug 15 at 7:23
  • @braiam Do you recommond to keep error: in the title when it is a part of the error generated by the tools? Aug 15 at 8:36
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    @SeyyedKhandon If it's clearly defined and unique, yes, otherwise if it's generic like "error: we found an error", then no. There are better descriptions.
    – Braiam
    Aug 15 at 22:30
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Short answer:

For an auto-generated error, it's not a bad idea, but in general no!


Long answer:

Based on Stack Exchange Rules you should avoid these patterns for the title:

  • [tag]: [question title]
  • [question title] -- [tag] [tag] [tag]
  • [question title] in [tag]
  • [tag] [tag] [question title] [tag] [tag] [tag]
  • [tag] [tag] [tag] [tag] [tag] [tag] [tag] [tag]

The first thing a developer does when he/she encounters an auto-generated error is to search the whole error:

Enter image description here

There will be several benefits to having the same title as an auto-generated error:

  • It is easier to find
  • This prevents the creation of duplicate questions with slightly different wording.

Enter image description here

However, there is a little problem here, and depending on the platform, it may have a different error message:

Enter image description here

It can now result in duplicate questions! So, what can be done? Here are two ways to rephrase the error as a new and accepted question:

  • How to
  • Why

How to fix Uncaught TypeError on assignment to constant variable?

The question is now excellent and accepted on Stack Overflow! However, this is a simple example that works! Due to the variety of error messages and people's differing views, duplicate questions can occur when the wording is slightly different.

To conclude, if you can make a great question title using the words "How to" or "why" without missing any part of the error and putting precisely what the error message is in the first paragraph of the body, this is the preferred way. However, if you can't make it great, just use the "auto-generated error" as the title.

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