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I'm working on a medium-sized project that is about to become a large project. We are about to onboard a large number of new developers with a wide range of experience. Our current standard development environment includes Eclipse, WildFly, Maven, Git, and a number of other components and dependencies.

We would like to automate the setup of the development environment of our new developers as much as possible.

This is a legitimate need that I have seen almost everywhere I have worked over the past 30 years.

I would like to as the question of how to automate the process of setting up the development environment as much as possible.

When I asked this on Stack Overflow the question was downvoted and fairly quickly (within 24 hours) removed for being inappropriate.

How/where can I ask this question?

The original question is shown below.


We've created an instance of our developers environment that was relatively easy to build and is relatively simple to get up and running.

This instance was created by essentially moving all of our dependencies under a single roof and then zipping up the directory and posting it to a public place where it can be accessed by anyone that needs it (we are working on an opensource project, so this is basically anyone that wants it).

To install and use the environment requires simply downloading and unzipping the zip file, updating the path and java_home environment variables, and pointing Git to the SSL file.

The instance includes the following

  • Eclipse that is configured with the defaults we like to use
  • An instance of WildFly
  • A WildFly instance configured in Eclipse (the server is ready to go out-of-the-box after installation)
  • The instance of Java we use
  • A Git client
  • Maven
  • Other convenience resources

Instructions for downloading and using this instance are here:

https://nachc-cad.github.io/fhir-to-omop/pages/navbar/how-tos/developer-how-tos/install-eclipse/InstallEclipse.html

Is there a better way to create and distribute this type of instant fully-featured all-inclusive developers environment?

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    What's wrong with what you're doing now? I.e. why do you want to improve it, what's your goal here? You say it's already easy and simple, so define "better". What are the limitations on a solution, e.g. if we suggest providing a preconfigured VM for each developer, would that fly? Aug 8 at 12:56
  • 2
    Although this isn't on-topic for Stack Overflow due to lacking focus, there's an already existing (closed) question for this: How to automate development environment setup? Aug 8 at 12:58
  • 13
    This is likely not on-topic anywhere in the network. "A better way" is heavily opinionated and broad, and not a good fit for the vast majority of SE sites. Reddit or similar might be better Aug 8 at 12:58
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    "Is there a better way?" is the beginning of a discussion (or an attempt to capture as many answerers as possible). Perhaps there is already a specific question? Like "It currently takes 39 minutes and our KPI demands at most 7 minutes. Of this the Maven part takes up 54%. I have tried to improve it, but it failed due to X, Y, and Z. How can I fix it?". Any specific question may get answers that also include more general tips and tricks (besides answering the specific question). Site Code Review is only for code (I think) Aug 8 at 14:38
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    Well... how is all other software installed and has been installed for decades? Through an installer generator, of which there are several choices. Other very common tools for rolling out software stacks and configuration are Ansible, Puppet, Chef, etc. etc. What works for servers also works for work machines. So asking "Is there a better way?" sounds very, very unresearched. Yes. Plenty. So even if it would not be closeworthy... I don't see this question fairing well in the quality voting department. But it isn't a programming question, so it is hard to predict what it would do.
    – Gimby
    Aug 12 at 13:08

1 Answer 1

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Firstly, regarding deletion of your original question:

I was the moderator who deleted your question. It had been flagged as SPAM, and on first reading I felt it was doing very little except driving traffic to your link, which fits a reasonably common pattern for SPAM here: A link to a project or product with some "fluff" added to it to turn it into a question.

I realize now that you probably weren't trying to advertise your pre-packaged dev environment, so I've cleared the SPAM flag so that it won't impact your account, which incidentally undeletes your question (though it doesn't reopen it, so it still will not be accepting answers).


Regarding your followup questions:

How/where can I ask this question?

As to how you can ask this question here:

Your question is off-topic here, and there likely isn't a way to make it on-topic.

One interpretation of your question is a request for a tool to do what you're trying to do. This is off topic here, as asking for tool recommendations is off-topic:

Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it.

Another interpretation is a request for help writing such a tool, and this is also off-topic as it's hopelessly broad and you're starting from nothing (at least, you have not provided any of the code you've written so far, or asked a specific question about what you've already written). We have no indication of which language you would want to use, which operating systems it should run under, or any answers to dozens or hundreds of product requirements such a tool would have. Answers to this question are completely open-ended.


As to where you can ask this question:

It's not the job of this site's users to direct off-topic questions elsewhere. Telling you where to find your answer is just answering with indirection, and the whole point of drawing an on-topic/off-topic line in the sand is to not have to provide answers on the off-topic side of that line.

It is enough for this site that your question is off-topic here. It's your job to find alternative places to ask it.

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  • Re; "It's not the job of this site's users to direct off-topic questions elsewhere." What about [site-recommendation] questions? Or do you just mean in general?
    – zcoop98
    Aug 8 at 16:12
  • @zcoop98 Not really sure what you mean; that tag is unused.
    – user229044 Mod
    Aug 8 at 16:26
  • Sorry, meant the meta tag, I linked incorrectly. [site-recommendation]
    – zcoop98
    Aug 8 at 16:27
  • I really am just trying to find a better solution to a complex task I'm faced with and one that I've seen over-and-over and leave a bread crumb trail for the next person that has this problem. This meta question seems like exactly the thing the [site-recommendation] tag (meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/site-recommendation) is for.
    – John
    Aug 8 at 23:40
  • @John Yes, this is the place to ask about what site to ask at. But you got your answer, there isn't one. What is the point of your last comment?
    – philipxy
    Aug 9 at 0:42

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