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I need to know how popular one of my posts is. The more people it attracts, the greater the chance that someone can and will answer.

If it's not very popular, I need to ask my question differently.

The best way to determine the popularity of a post is not to check how many people have viewed it - anyway that information is readily available. However, a poorly written post can result in many views, but that doesn't mean anyone is interested once they see what the post contains.

What I need to know is how many people are following the post (not how many followers I have - that's the most common answer I got - even on Google search - when I looked for an answer to this question).

So, how do I find out how many people are actually following my post?

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    There are many factors that impact how many people see your post, that are out of your control. Please focus on writing the best quality question you can. That's how the site is supposed to work: you help build it by making a good question that belongs on the site, and we do our part to build the site by giving an answer (which only incidentally helps you as the asker). I know that description sounds cruel, but. Aug 7 at 21:25

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Following a post is private, unlike bookmarking it, which is public. Whether anyone is following your post is something only known to moderators and authorized staff.

A count was requested in this answer when following was originally implemented, and this was the Stack Exchange response...

Sorry, this isn't going to happen. We are concerned that if posts have the number of followers marked, that they will become magnets for answer/comment spam.

We don't have any plans to add it to SEDE at this time, for the same reason.

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  • Thanks, much obliged. It's after all better to know you can't do it than searching in vain for how to. Also a special thanks for removing my request for advise: it became moot, of course. 👍 Aug 7 at 20:58
  • Re "become magnets for answer/comment spam": Couldn't the same be said for views? Aug 8 at 21:44
  • @PeterMortensen indeed, although this comment might work better on the answer I linked as the poster of the comment might respond. Aug 8 at 22:20

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