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My question (How can I tell if a specified folder is in my PATH using PowerShell?) was closed because "This question needs details or clarity. It is not currently accepting answers."

What was wrong with my question? How could I add more details or clarity?

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    Do the answers it already has not work for you? Aug 4 at 14:53
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    I would've expected this to be closed as a duplicate of something if I'm honest. I can't understand why it was closed as needs details or clarity, it's abundantly clear what's being asked. Aug 4 at 14:55
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    @RobertLongson surely understanding how to ask a good question and trying to address issues is a noble goal in itself.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 4 at 14:59
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    I concur with Nick, though, in that this question is perfectly clear. I don't see how it could be improved any further (maybe an example of the call site, but...). Based on the comments ("What have you already tried? What problem(s) did you have?"), I suspect it was closed because some people think "needs details or clarity" includes lack of problem-solving effort; they are mistaken. I've reopened the post.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 4 at 15:00
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    It could, of course, be a duplicate, but "needs details or clarity" is also not "there's probably a duplicate but I can't be bothered to find it."
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 4 at 15:07
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    If it had a different set of tags under it, I highly suspect this question would have collected a couple of "lacking research" downvotes by now. Terseness can be self-sabotage. There are a couple of red flags here that will trigger people. No question in the question body, for example. No context of any kind.
    – Gimby
    Aug 4 at 15:10
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    @RobertLongson I don't see how it matters whether there's an answer that helps the OP. We don't close questions (or decide not to reopen them) simply because the OP has been helped. That's something that would happen in a help-desk situation, which doesn't apply on this site.
    – cigien
    Aug 4 at 16:15
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    "No question in the question body" -> "This question needs details or clarity". "like this" -> "This question needs details or clarity".
    – philipxy
    Aug 4 at 20:20
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    Never take the reasons for being closed seriously. It's pretty much a random choice.
    – Cerad
    Aug 4 at 22:15
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    @Cerad That is a little too harsh. It is random in the case where people try to pin a close reason on something that at best deserves downvoting, sure. But it is not like close voting is going wrong on a grand scale here.
    – Gimby
    Aug 5 at 10:00
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    I appreciate how nobody is addressing the elephant in the room, namely the reason this question got "incorrectly" closed. That reason is that overloaded curators are so tired of having their options for nuking zero-effort questions like these continually whittled down, that they have resorted to closing with whatever close reason that's the fastest. And they're not wrong, because the problem of garbage on this site is far more serious than the problem of "my garbage question was closed because I'm too lazy to spend 5 seconds using Google waaah".
    – Ian Kemp
    Aug 5 at 14:12
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    @IanKemp Yet despite curation pretty much being a fruitless endeavour, I can find my answers with ease. I think that people who are neck deep into curation kind of make themselves believe that they are the ones keeping the house of cards from collapsing. But no, not really. It only makes it hard to find stuff to answer. There is a lot of incoming crud, there already is a Lot of crud in the repository. And it is going to stay. Forever. Just do what you can within reason to reduce the pile and don't burnout. Emphasis on the not burning out part, by the way.
    – Gimby
    Aug 5 at 14:52
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    @Ian I have been shouting into the void about incorrect closures for years now, I think nobody cares anymore, and I gave up (on the site as well, returning when I feel like it again). It is nigh impossible to get an incorrectly closed question reopened, unless you open a Meta question at the right time using the correct phrasing. Otherwise it will remain closed, even if it was closed using close vote abuse (by mod or not), because "well it wasn't that good a question anyway". It is a sign of exhausted members inventing their own rules to make the site something they want, which it never was.
    – CodeCaster
    Aug 5 at 15:35
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    @IanKemp If they're overworked, it would be vastly preferable that they do nothing rather than incorrectly close helpful Q&As. A million junk questions are better than one good question closed. Aug 5 at 21:13
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    @KevinKrumwiede You couldn't be more wrong if you tried.
    – Ian Kemp
    Aug 7 at 19:54

2 Answers 2

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What was wrong with my question?

If you ask a question, people like to see what you've tried to solve it yourself and an accurate description of what you're trying to do, so answerers can get a grasp of where exactly you're stuck, showing them from where they can take off writing an answer, and later visitors can compare whether your question is equal to theirs.

Your question was, paraphrased, but actually quite literally:

Q: how to do the thing?

Please fill in the blanks:

function MyFunction()
{
    // your code here
}

No research shown whatsoever. But we've got downvote buttons for that, it's no reason to close a question.

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    It's worth noting that a lack of demonstrated research effort isn't necessarily something wrong, unless the question is a duplicate (or really obvious). Usually "I googled all the things but found nothing" or whatever is just noise. That said, you're likely correct that this is what (incorrectly) generated the close votes.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Aug 4 at 15:15
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    @Ryan a proper problem description can demonstrate research in and of itself, and provide clarity about what the asker actually wants to know. This question has none of that, which screams "I've tried nothing and I'm all out of ideas", to which close-voters go "hmm well it's not clear to me whether you want to know how to read environment variables, or whether you're trying to do a substring comparison, and since that makes it two questions in one, you know what, have a close-vote and first go figure out what you actually want to ask by yourself".
    – CodeCaster
    Aug 4 at 15:19
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    Re "... people like to see what you've tried to solve it yourself.", speaking for myself, I absolutely do not want to see that. When looking for an answer on SO, I want to see a clearly specified problem in the question, and answers that provide solutions to the problem. If the OP's attempt is in the question, I almost always end up scrolling past it because a non-working solution (which is what the attempt is going to be by definition) is completely useless to me.
    – cigien
    Aug 4 at 16:31
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    @cigien that's when looking for an answer. Sure, "research effort" might be a somewhat too narrow definition, but it's all about context, scope and goals, and almost none of those were in the question. As a later visitor, you want all of that to be able to determine whether the question actually equals your search query. I'm sure you can find the answers to "PowerShell read environment variable" and "PowerShell compare substring". I am just explaining why a potential answerer might find the question downvote-worthy (it says right so on the downvote tooltip).
    – CodeCaster
    Aug 4 at 17:00
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    What additional "context, scope and goals" does the linked question need? It looks very clear to me, and if I were looking for a way to determine if a specific folder is in my PATH, using powershell, the question is very clearly what I would be looking for.
    – cigien
    Aug 4 at 17:07
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    Also, re your latest edit, "where exactly you're stuck" seems to be relevant mostly to help the OP specifically. For other readers (and that's who the Q&A is supposed to be helping, not just the OP), why should they care where exactly the OP is stuck? They only care about finding a solution to the problem, and if the problem is clearly defined (as it is here), why should any additional information be needed?
    – cigien
    Aug 4 at 17:08
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    @cigien I'm not interested in continuing this pointless discussion any further. Research is required, it says right so in all the rules. Both questions that can be extracted from OP's question have been answered before. They're just trying to compare strings. They don't show what they've tried. People don't like that. Period. That's my answer.
    – CodeCaster
    Aug 4 at 17:10
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    @CodeCaster, I agree with you. I like to see what the OP has tried so I can (usually) point out the one mistake they've made, and then I don't have to come up with all the code myself. Knowing how to debug is just as important, if not more important, than knowing how to write code. And, as so many people say (including me), we aren't a code writing service. Aug 4 at 19:38
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    @cigien the presumed logical steps to solving the problem are: figure out what the PATH is; check if the specified folder is in that PATH. Presumably it isn't safe to use, say, a substring search for the latter; but since this is a shell language it isn't obvious if we can easily get the path data into any kind of actual data structure, or if we need to split it in lines and iterate over them to look for an exact match, or just what. That said, I agree that partial/broken code in the OP is often a net negative for the question quality.. Aug 4 at 20:04
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    @computercarguy we're also not a debugging service, so,
    – Kevin B
    Aug 4 at 20:05
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    @KevinB, you are the first person I've seen say that. If we go by what the definitions of SE I've heard now, we aren't a code writing service, debugging service, we don't answer homework questions, we aren't here to teach, it's not a forum, we don't answer duplicate questions, and we don't answer questions that can be answered with RTFM. So what is this place that doesn't contradict all of that? I've yet to hear a good explanation that meets all the "we don't do this" criteria. The fact is that we do all of the above, but some people don't think we should or are convinced we don't. Aug 4 at 20:38
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    @computercarguy: I think the key thing running through off of those not-an-X-service is the word service. SO is a community of people that don't mind helping other people sometimes, and along the way building a repository of Q&As with future value. We do write answers with code, when that's part of answering an interesting generic question with future value. We don't write answers with code because someone demanded it for their specific case. We also don't like (or get much value for the site) from debugging question with problems that are obvious when single-stepping with a debugger. Aug 4 at 23:31
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    @PeterCordes, "...is the word service", yet we do provide a service, one that helps people with a variety of problems. We even provide the (free) service of moderating posts, making edits to questions and answers to make them more legible, and much more. And "answering and interesting generic question" is highly objective. What one person thinks is interesting, another thinks is off-topic. What one thinks is generic, another thinks is too broad and another thinks it is too narrow. The only thing consistent in the definition of this site is it's inconsistency and contradictions. Aug 5 at 15:28
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    @computercarguy: Re: dictionary definitions, #4 is the act of serving, like MW's example "did him a service". That's not something Stack Overflow can be; it is a place where can people do "service work". From context, I think "SO is not an X service" implies the utility definition. I know that's how I understand the phrase, and even after you point out the alternate defintion, I think it doesn't really fit as a reading of "not an X service". But I can imagine that some people might manage to read it differently from how I know it's meant, so worth considering an alternative I guess. Aug 5 at 21:02
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    @PeterCordes, I wish I could help you with a definition of what SE does, but mine is based on examples I've seen for many years and experience I've had actually using SE, which apparently doesn't agree with other people's definition of what SE is. I've yet to get any kind of real definition of what the site is, except "we don't do that" even though I see it frequently. That's why I made my 2nd comment on this thread. If I took every person literally when they say "we don't do that here", then I'd have to believe this site doesn't do anything and every post should be closed and/or deleted. Aug 5 at 22:29
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There’s a vocal contingent of Stack Overflow users who are convinced that ‘easy’ questions that don’t demonstrate ‘research’ by the asker don’t deserve answers. However, the site software does not allow for a possibility of a question being closed merely for being ‘easy’. So the voters simply use whatever means are available to them to make the question go away, regardless of whether the site feature was designed for it or not: vote to close as ‘not reproducible’ or ‘needs details’, vote down, and if the score is −3, vote to delete. There was nothing unclear about your question; the votes to close were tactical ones.

To be clear, I think this is nonsense. The only kind of ‘research’ that should be absolutely required of askers is that they know what they are doing: they understand enough of their tool and of their problem domain to know their way around a problem and understand a clearly written answer. They should be able to know what a literal, a variable or a function is. They should not be wondering what a loop is in the middle of implementing a sorting algorithm — unless the question is specifically about how loops work.

I have no sympathy for ‘do my entire homework exercise for me’ questions, for copy-paste programming, or programming by permutation, where the asker has no desire to learn anything and just wants a ready-made solution to plagiarise, but anything short of that is fair and square in my book.

And in fact, even the ‘easy’ questions are sometimes only superficially so. This is a pretty good example of one: many users here seem convinced that solving the problem is simply a matter of splitting the value of the PATH environment variable on every occurrence of the ; character and then checking string equality. But as this answer points out, that would be wrong, because PATH entries on Windows can be quoted, and quoted entries can contain ; as a normal character. And pathnames need to be normalized for e.g. spurious or non-canonical path separators (C:\WINDOWS\, C:\\\WINDOWS, C:/WINDOWS), and other things. Accounting for those possibilities will complicate the code enough to make the task not so trivial any more, and reveals reasoning to the tune of

hmm well it's not clear to me whether you want to know how to read environment variables, or whether you're trying to do a substring comparison, and since that makes it two questions in one, you know what, have a close-vote and first go figure out what you actually want to ask by yourself

for the fallacious folly it is.

It is telling that one of the canonical examples of the so-called XY problem is also pathname manipulation. I think it’s worth appreciating askers who go out of their way to avoid falling into the trap of ‘oh, it’s just a string’.

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  • Thanks for quoting my ridiculous oversimplification and pointing out the ridiculousness thereof. I'm not saying easy questions have no place on SO, and I'm not saying that this question is trivial, let alone that its answers would be; sorry if it seemed to be. All I was trying to explain, is how close-voters would react in a kneejerk way to seemingly trivial questions, and that they're wrong. I find your answer amazingly to the point, and @Cody's comment proof of the complexity of the subject. The question simply shows no research, hence the downvotes.
    – CodeCaster
    Aug 6 at 20:21
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    My problem with the site at large and meta in particular is that there is a group of users who close about everything they don't like, because they know the answer, or they don't want to answer, or they don't know how to answer, or they don't like the subject or phrasing of the question. They're abusing their close vote powers, and they've got moderators in their ranks. And they're very vocal, and they use their voting powers to the same tune on meta. They stop me from participating, and not only me.
    – CodeCaster
    Aug 6 at 20:28
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    I am really struggling to understand what your second comment has to do with anything that was discussed here, @CodeCaster. Yes, certain types of discussions are shut down on Meta, including by mods (often me!). In particular, that includes questions which are little more than unconstructive rants (which do fall into the category of "things I do not like"). However, this is not one of those, and it wasn't shut down or otherwise closed. I also regularly close discussions on Meta that are dupes, because I don't like saying/hearing the same thing over and over. But that's not anti-participatory.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 7 at 10:58
  • @Cody that comment does not apply to this question in particular. In the past few years I have posted multiple questions and answers on Meta explaining my stance on (moderator) close vote behavior on Main and Meta, and about the close vote club activity on Meta. There are people who are nipping discussions in the bud a bit too aggressively, both by close-voting and pile-on-downvoting, because they're on Meta/chat all day and have seen it all before and are bored out on Main, and in that way are determining what does and doesn't get discussed here.
    – CodeCaster
    Aug 7 at 12:55

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