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Part1

I failed a review audit by clicking the edit button, and I would like to get some clarity why, and see if anyone else maybe agrees with my views in the bottom half of this post.

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This is a screenshot of the specific one that I tried to edit, and I am curious why choosing to improve this answer would be considered an immediate failure.

The article it links to I think is an excellent resource. With some cleanup and including an excerpt or information from the link could have turned this into an acceptable and helpful answer with the link to remain as a resource for future visitors. The answerer does not appear to be associated with the website or author and the linked webpage has no advertising on it. If my review response was that it looked okay to me then I could understand the audit failure, but not for selecting to edit/improve it.


Part2

I also disagree with automatically failing someone for clicking the edit button in a general sense for a number of reasons.

  1. It is impossible to know what how the reviewer intends to improve the question/answer.

  2. Choosing to edit a review isn't considered a final answer in the review process. Once you have clicked edit I imagine it is fairly common for the reviewer to change their mind and click cancel and choose to approve or suggest deletion.

  3. I know that participating in reviews is considered a privilege but in the end reviewers are actually volunteering their time to help moderate the site for free so choosing to punish them for attempting to improve the site seems counterintuitive.

In conclusion, since editing is not a final answer in the review process and since it is impossible to know how the reviewer is planning on improving the question/answer, and since they are essentially moderating the site for free, I think choosing to auto-fail them for attempting to make the site better is the wrong way to go about it.

I can understand making the reviewer aware of the fact that they tried to edit/improve a post that was removed from the site previously, but choosing to punish them for trying to improve an answer when they are volunteering with quality control for the site is kind of ridiculous in my opinion.

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    Because it is nothing but a link. The non-link content does not answer anything about the question. Moreover since it was flagged as spam presumably the article is by the author & this exists just to spam. Your post is not consistent with the Help center re answering & reviewing.
    – philipxy
    Jul 30 at 4:23
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    @philipxy There is no evidence that the article was written by the poster, and the article doesn't link to any services or payed offers, its literally just a link to information on the topic the OP question is about.
    – Alexander
    Jul 30 at 4:26
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    The title confuses me. This is a spam review audit. Jul 30 at 4:26
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    Again: A post whose non-link content doesn't answer on its own is "Not An Answer".
    – philipxy
    Jul 30 at 4:28
  • That said, I agree that this was a tricky spam audit without the context that there are two other answers (A1 and A2) posted in a short amount of time all linking to the exact same article. Jul 30 at 4:29
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    I think the point I make in the last paragraph is the one that confuses me the most... Since choosing to edit isn't considered a final answer in the review process, why would it be considered an automatic failure in the audit?
    – Alexander
    Jul 30 at 4:35
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    That's true of all audits. Choosing the top level choice almost always ends the audit whether or not there would normally be a follow up action/selection. Jul 30 at 4:38
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    The article it links to I think is an excellent resource. I may hope you stripped off all the campaign query parameters before you visited that article. If not, you added an impression to their campaign stats making SO a more lucrative target for this incomplete non-sense.
    – rene
    Jul 30 at 6:47
  • "Choosing to edit a review isn't considered a final answer in the review process. Once you have clicked edit, I imagine it is fairly common for the reviewer to change their mind and click cancel and choose to approve or suggest deletion" - Does not change the fact you were trying to edit or improve something that had already been deleted due to quality concerns nor does it change the fact the answer you were trying to improve wasn't an actual answer. Open reviews in another tab, simple way, to identity an audit also a great way to make proper review decisions Jul 30 at 14:19
  • Related.
    – ouflak
    Aug 11 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

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Right now all the useful information in the answer can only be accesed by going to the link. So despite the answer having other wording, that wording does not answer the question at all, it's just fluff padding out the link.

The review guidelines say:

Select Edit if the post is good quality, but you can improve the post to make it better. Avoid editing posts that should be closed or deleted, as it will remove the post from review.

But in this case

  1. the answer is not good quality in the first place since all the useful information accessible only via the link.
  2. The post should be deleted because of that and selecting edit will make that more difficult.
  3. You can't fix the post if your edits are limited to improvements to grammar, spelling and formatting, and that's what editing is for.

So clicking on the edit button was a mistake.

Having reviewers make mistakes means we need to correct those mistakes. Review suspensions are not really there to punish you, they are there so you notice that you've done something wrong and stop doing it. If your quality control efforts actually make the site worse then we need to correct that.

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  • How can a suspension be perceived as anything but a punishment... If all that was wanted was to draw attention than failing the review audit alone would achieve that. And what about all my other points? When someone chooses to edit in the review process they still have the opportunity to cancel. So automatically failing them when they assume they will have the opportunity to change their mind seems like punishment is actually the goal
    – Alexander
    Jul 30 at 6:50
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    Unfortunately unless people are temporarily stopped they don't read the text and just carry on merrily pressing buttons to get those lovely badges as quickly as possible. They are known as robo-reviewers. We need you to review correctly if you're going to do it at all. How can stopping you from doing free work be a punishment? Forcing you to do it might be a punishment. Jul 30 at 6:54
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    If you show that you now understand how to review correctly and commit to doing so in future, then a moderator might cancel your suspension. Jul 30 at 6:56
  • It's a punishment because clearly people enjoy improving the quality of the site. And It's not like you like the awards are actually worth anything. and you didn't address the fact that people expect to be able to cancel when they select the edit button.
    – Alexander
    Jul 30 at 7:01
  • The overwhelming likelihood is that you didn't select edit just so you can then subsequently select cancel. That's not reasonable behaviour and you're being disingenuous if you're arguing that it is. Jul 30 at 7:03
  • I am not arguing that was my intent in this case, but I do do that all the time. If I see something in a post that i know requires editing I will often hit the edit button, and then upon reading the rest of the question come to the conclusion it isn't salvageable or just isn't worth my time
    – Alexander
    Jul 30 at 7:05
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    So you need to learn to change your workflow to read the whole question, then decide whether it's salvageable. Jul 30 at 7:07
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Editing should only be used for salvageable content, which this post isn't. Content that isn't salvageable should be flagged as Rude/Spam or closed (whichever is appropriate).

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