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I've recently asked this question and, now that it got an answer, I'd like to know how to follow up with it.

The problem is that I couldn't really get that specific answer to work in my environment and I don't know for sure that it's 100% correct. However, the concept used in the answer was good enough to provide me with some searching topics to come up with my own solution after some time.

I've read some help topics about editing questions and answering your own questions in SO and now I don't know what to do. Should I answer my own question posting my solution? The solution is working for me but I'm pretty sure that it's flawed somewhere and it'd be great to have some feedback on it too. Should I comment on that previous answer that I couldn't get it running? Should I accept that answer as best answer and give the author's credit for helping me solve my problem? Or should I just upvote it?

There are a lot of options so, what does the SO community expects from me to help and keep this place clean and useful for everybody searching through the site in the future.

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  • 3
    It would have been better if the question had all relevant context from the start. I think it is still useful to share, at least to the OP of the answer that your actual context was more complex and that required serious adjustments to their answer. If you can make a clear and relevant distinction wrt your first question in what context an answer is needed, a more detailed follow up question, taking the work of the other OPs answer maybe as start pont, can work but only if that context is generic enough to more people then just you.
    – rene
    Jul 22 at 17:04
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    If an answer gave you good information to create your own solution, then it is pretty common to either write a comment under the answer when you want to provide just brief information about your adjustment or write your own answer post of you want to be more detailed. Which of both post you accept as the best is up to you, you're not required to chose the other answer, but you're still free to upvote it (or accept it and upvote it, that's up to you).
    – Tom
    Jul 22 at 17:16
  • @rene I totally agree with you. But I believe that I've provided all the relevant context in my question. I mentioned the database (SQLite) and the environment (Android) in the first paragraph of the question. I know that SQLite uses just a subset of the full SQL and I believe that is the problem. The answer provided to my question has syntax errors in it. I tried to solve them, without success. Jul 22 at 17:22
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    As for accepting an answer: That is 100% your call. You could even accept an answer that is 100% wrong but helped you the most for showing the wrong path. I know that is an extreme example and not many users will follow that reasoning, if at all but there is no rule to forbid that either. Neither is there a rule that accepting is mandatory.
    – rene
    Jul 22 at 17:24
  • "I couldn't really get that specific answer to work in my environment" Well, why not? What issue did you encounter when you tried? "However, the concept used in the answer was good enough to provide me with some searching topics to come up with my own solution after some time." What was your solution, and how did it differ from the original? Jul 22 at 17:28
  • OP is using SQLite but the answer uses SQL Server (I believe) hence some syntax errors would probably occur. Jul 22 at 18:27
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    Step 1: comment on the accepted answer with the additional fixes, give the answerer an opportunity to edit their own answer, or ask them if you can edit their answer to add the data. Step 2: if no response, write your own answer and credit the original answer that led you to the partial solution. Jul 22 at 18:28
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    The user who answered the question used TSQL syntax in his code which is quite different than SQLite's. It works fine (for your sample data) in SQL Server: dbfiddle.uk/… All you had to do, instead of asking a question here, is leave a comment under the answer in which you would ask if they can translate the code so that it works in SQLite also.
    – forpas
    Jul 22 at 19:26
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    @DanielWiddis [Do bear in mind that replies may come from people in different timezones, so they might reply quickly for a while, then have to enter a sleep cycle. Jul 22 at 19:34
  • @DanielWiddis Also some people have a paying job too, which they may sometimes have to concentrate on.😉 Jul 23 at 0:27
  • @AndrewMorton I said "give the answerer an opportunity". I did not place a super-short timeline on it. Heck, I'd give a week. Jul 23 at 4:48
  • I think it really depends on how substantially different your own answer will be compared to the existing answer. If the difference is just some syntax tweaks, I'd recommend asking the original answerer if they'd mind you editing their answer. Jul 23 at 7:41
  • To some extent, it depends on how you resolved the problem (i.e., how different it is from what was in the original answer) and what problem you encountered with that answer (maybe it should be improved instead). Jul 27 at 1:33

3 Answers 3

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You have the option to answer your own question.

One solution might be to provide your answer alongside the helpful answer.

Upvote the helpful answer and reference it in your own answer, but accept your own as it was the solution to your problem.

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    This sums up pretty nicely and succinctly what I too believe is the way to go. I would only add that the OP's answer should reference the other answer mentioning that it directed OP to the right direction
    – Tomerikoo
    Jul 24 at 11:28
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Should I answer my own question posting my solution?

Yes! You've got a working solution, you've gained some valuable insights through further research, you might have found some resources worth sharing - by all means, write that up as an answer!

The solution is working for me but I'm pretty sure that it's flawed somewhere and it'd be great to have some feedback on it too.

You might get feedback through comments on your answer, another option to get feedback on working code is Code Review.

Should I comment on that previous answer that I couldn't get it running?

Yes, if there's some problem with the code in the answer, the author will want to know. You can also describe how you got it working if that fits in a comment, or just point to your answer.

Should I accept that answer as best answer and give the author's credit for helping me solve my problem? Or should I just upvote it?

Definitely upvote it, since you found the concept useful. Which answer to accept is completely up to you.

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I think there's rather a spectrum here:

  • An answer that is correct and might be considered complete by some readers, but that requires expert knowledge to implement.
  • An answer that is correct and complete but only works in certain circumstances, which might or might not match the circumstances described in your question.
  • An answer that points you in the right general direction, but requires significant work on your part to turn into a working solution.
  • An answer that tells you why your code is failing, but doesn't tell you how to fix it.
  • An answer that tells you your approach is completely misguided and suggests a different way of tackling the problem.

In all these cases I think the first course of action is to comment on the answer. Whether you accept the answer is up to you, and depends on how much it helped you towards an eventual solution.

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