94

https://stackoverflow.com/a/29169135/7910454

enter image description here

Seems totally fine to me and even has 5 upvotes.

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  • 30
    The answer is nothing more than a quote. From How to reference material written by others: "In particular, answers comprised entirely of a quote (sourced or not) will often be deleted since they do not contain any original content."
    – Larnu
    Jul 19 at 15:12
  • 44
    @Larnu I understand but shouldn't a strict enforcement of the rules sometimes be deferred in favor of providing a useful answer? The only reason my question was answered is because I can see deleted posts :/
    – leonheess
    Jul 19 at 15:38
  • 12
    The answer is essentially plagiarism. It's sourced, yes, and it would've been fine if the quote was used to back up OPs statements, but that wasn't the case here. The equivalent here is handing in a research paper that's 100% quoted from another paper or other form of source. "research paper" in this case can also be replaced with uni/school assignment, or anything else where your work is expected to be original. The same logic extends to Stack posts. Without the quote, it'd be a link-only answer, which we also don't allow. The only person who can fix it is OP, and that assumes they want to Jul 19 at 15:43
  • 102
    @ZoestandswithUkraine Minor point: I don't see how this is "essentially plagiarism". Doesn't plagiarism require at least some degree of passing off the content as one's own? From the help-center: "posting the work of others with no indication that it is not your own". In this answer, there's a link, the copied text is quoted, and the answer literally says "copied here". It should be deleted for not having any original content, for sure, but I don't see how the the answer can be described as plagiarism at all.
    – cigien
    Jul 19 at 16:01
  • 61
    @ZoestandswithUkraine There is a tiny difference: SO is not a research journal. As long as answer gives credit to the original source and contains all necessary information to remain useful in case the link rots, it should be OK. Jul 19 at 16:05
  • 62
    @ZoestandswithUkraine I understand where you are coming from but I really think you should try to take a step back and think about how you want to impact this community. The answer was obviously helping people and you take that away from them because you allege "sourced plagiarism" of open-source documentation? Is that a practical and solution-oriented approach to community moderation?
    – leonheess
    Jul 19 at 16:10
  • 9
    According to one of plagiarism.org's definitions: "copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not (see our section on "fair use" rules)" - it's still plagiarism, English is weird. Jul 19 at 16:11
  • 10
    @leonheess This is one of our many rules that are clearly outlined and documented; posts only consisting of copy-pasta are subject to deletion, regardless of whether or not english can make up its mind on what it considers plagiarism to be. Also, even if OP doesn't return to edit their answer, you can still write your own answer to replace it Jul 19 at 16:15
  • 15
    @leonheess Making exceptions for "helpful" content opens an entire truckload of worms. Moderators are there to enforce the rules; any salvaging they can do along the way is extra. The practical and solution-oriented approach is that you edit the answer or write a new one to get the content into shape. Jul 19 at 16:19
  • 69
    @ZoestandswithUkraine No offense, but I don't think you understand me (or want to?). It's not about this specific question that obviously could be fixed. It's about the fact that parts of the moderation on this site are totally fine with leaving a question worse off and less helpful than they have found it. Maybe you should strive to make this community better and more helpful instead of striving the be the rule police.
    – leonheess
    Jul 19 at 16:24
  • 11
    @leonheess If it's not about the specific question, then please edit your question to be more general, e.g. "should questions like this be deleted?" A discussion can certainly be had about whether it's beneficial to the site to delete such questions, or not, but currently the rules are to delete such questions. Mods are supposed to enforce the current rules, and if you want to change the rules you need community support to do that. (Make sure to see if there are duplicate discussions about this on Meta.)
    – cigien
    Jul 19 at 16:28
  • 6
    @MisterMiyagi No rule book is perfect and accounts for everything. That is why it is so important that rules are applied with sanity and reason. That is true for rules in the real world and on SO. I'd much rather have moderation that judges every case by itself and is therefore slightly inconsistent than one that destroys value in the name of order and consistency.
    – leonheess
    Jul 19 at 16:29
  • 14
    @leonheess The rule book accounts for this case by allowing the community to salvage the content, so I really don't see why the rules should be bent. Expecting moderators to salvage everything possible just isn't realistic with the workload at SO. Jul 19 at 16:33
  • 37
    For link-only answers, we request that they put the bit from the link they're referring to into the answer (to avoid link rot). But now we also delete their post after they do that (for only including a quote). This is like a catch-22 when the answer to the question posed is basically "you didn't read the documentation so let me spoon feed it to you". Jul 19 at 17:18
  • 13
    And as a Community we can't undo it! A moderator has deleted this post and it cannot be undeleted Jul 20 at 2:55

4 Answers 4

84

Our policy has always been to discourage quote-only answers on the basis that usually an ideal answer to a question will consist of more than just a quote from the docs. But we've never outright forbidden quote-only answers, in part because sometimes a quote from an external source does completely answer the question, and there's nothing more that can be usefully added.

Consider the example of good quoting from the Referencing docs:

According to Ernest Hemingway - Biographical on Nobelprize.org, Hemingway saw combat when he was a teenager. It says:

After the United States entered the First World War, he joined a volunteer ambulance unit in the Italian army. Serving at the front, he was wounded, was decorated by the Italian Government, and spent considerable time in hospitals ....

[other sources, quotes, explanations, etc. necessary to complete the answer]

Well, what happens if in fact the quote is a sufficient answer to the question already? Then no other "sources, quotes, explanations, etc." are "necessary" to complete the answer, and so, strictly speaking, the "[other sources, quotes, explanations, etc. necessary to complete the answer]" section can and should be empty. And then - as a result of strictly following the instructions in the Help Center - you're left with exactly the kind of quote-only answer that this Meta question is about.

Boltclock endorsed the position that quote-only answers are okay back when he was a mod - see https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/321326/1709587:

Granted, there are some situations where indeed there isn't much more to be said than one or two well-written paragraphs from a documentation section or a language specification. That's fine, you're not going to get into trouble for doing that every now and then. Just remember that you still need to provide attribution and quote the text as required above.

Boltclock's position is consistent with the official rules in the help center, which don't at any point say that quote-only answers are outright banned or must be deleted. It also seems to me like common sense. After all, what's the alternative? Is ferventcoder supposed to quote the official docs and also include a paraphrase of them? Why? What purpose would be served by that?

The answer should be undeleted.

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    I tend to agree with the consensus here. The answer is an actual answer and the existing guidance about answers suggests a minimal quote should be enough. The answer is undeleted.
    – Machavity Mod
    Jul 20 at 12:42
  • 2
    "Is ferventcoder supposed to quote the official docs and also include a paraphrase of them " — I personally like having a summarization sentence to make it super clear at a glance what the answer is. I'll also do this for any of my own answers that go into the depths of why the answer is correct; basically a tldr that shows what to do, with more in depth "why" following.
    – M. Justin
    Jul 22 at 2:54
  • @M.Justin If it's something big, a tldr maybe justified. This is just two to four lines, a summarization isn't justified. Also, if the original author didn't add a tldr, edits would clearly conflict with the author's intent.
    – TheMaster
    Jul 22 at 10:58
  • 1
    I am not sure I agree entirely with your reasoning there, @TheMaster - in particular, I think that's an excessively broad definition of "conflicts with the author's intent". But we do reach the same conclusion in this particular case; my stylistic preference is for the straightforward version you've edited the answer to in revision 9 rather than the revision before.
    – Mark Amery
    Jul 22 at 11:47
  • 2
    Getting into the (probably unimportant) details, I think the reason I'm not a fan of @M.Justin's summary in revision 8 is it's an awkward halfway between a comprehensive paraphrase of the answer and just an introduction to the quote. The summary isn't a usable answer on its own because necessary details are omitted (where do I put this .ignore file? What do I name it?). But if it's just meant to be an intro that leads into the quote that actually has the answer, why bother with details like the file being empty? More succinct: "Use a .ignore file. As stated in the docs... <quote>"
    – Mark Amery
    Jul 22 at 11:55
  • I do think this is just a subjective and debatable matter of good style, though, and I don't endorse looking at it through the lens of the site's editing rules. We are all just aiming for a good, polished answer, here, and perhaps we're in tension with each other due to differing stylistic opinions, but nobody benefits from pulling out the rulebook.
    – Mark Amery
    Jul 22 at 12:05
  • 1
    @MarkAmery Incidentally, I think I like your 3-word intro better than my longer one (mostly for the reason you stated). It still gets across to solution at an immediate glance, and makes it clear that the rest of this particular answer is worth paying attention to when quickly scanning through answers.
    – M. Justin
    Jul 22 at 15:11
  • Isn't Use a .ignore file. basically just a repetition of the following two to three lines? Also, why should anyone else edit into OP's post their personal style preference? Anyway, at least for this answer, I don't think we should add anything else, for the sake of meta, as it sets precedence, that such quote only answers are fine.
    – TheMaster
    Jul 22 at 15:22
  • 2
    @TheMaster Yes, it is a repetition. However, it's a repetition in an easily scanned, four-word summary that stands out from a multiparagraph blockquote without making the post overly noisy. If I'm scanning through a question with lots of answers, being able to quickly get the gist of an answer to see if it's an approach I want to pursue is helpful. This isn't a deal breaker by any means, but i feel it's a "nice to have".
    – M. Justin
    Jul 22 at 16:11
91

The answer's first accusation was plagiarism. Given that the answer linked and sourced the content, this accusation should be thrown out. The author of the post was also active with repo during that time. Most probably, He quoted himself.

That leaves us with the second accusation: "Link only post, entirely quoted from external source".

The deletion guidelines says:

Answer posts that do not fundamentally answer the question may be removed.

There are six clauses written explaining what doesn't "fundamentally answer" the question. The only clause that's relevant here is the fifth one:

barely more than a link to an external site

One could accuse the answer of being "just more than a link". But the guidelines explains this clause further:

(i.e. the actual answer is not included in the post)

The actual answer is actually present in this post. If the answer only presented a link and said "Go here and read", I would say that's "barely more than a link" and should be deleted. But this is no where near such a scenario. It's a focussed answer to a question, which even users unfamiliar with the subject can understand. It should not have been deleted at all, especially not by a single vote. Given the upvotes, it also significantly added value to the community.

Then, there's another guideline in the plagiarism section:

"In particular, answers comprised entirely of a quote (sourced or not) will often be deleted since they do not contain any original content."

Even if we were to follow the letter of the law, rather than the spirit, the rules allow leeway in this case. "Often" here doesn't mean "always". It implies that there are cases where it'll be left alone or another action should be taken, such as editing to improve the post. This answer is a prime example where ruling in favor of leaving it alone, is more than reasonable. The question is already linking the documentation and asking questions about it. The answer is quoting the documentation. What difference or what value would be added to the answer, if the poster (who probably is the author of the original quote) repeated the same in different words?

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    @Larnu What improvement would you suggest here?
    – TheMaster
    Jul 19 at 17:29
  • 3
    As a non-SME I can't answer that; I'm disputing your statement that often means deleted or left alone, I'm not suggesting what could be done specifically improve the example, just that improvement is an option other than deletion.
    – Larnu
    Jul 19 at 17:32
  • 3
    @TheMaster deletion is always an option. If the content is truly valuable, it'll return.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 19 at 18:11
  • 3
    @KevinB I would disagree. There are plenty of posts, which the meta would be glad to delete for various reasons, but those info are hard to come by. If it's truly valuable, valued more than the imaginary internet points gained by sharing that info, I believe it'll stay hidden. Market forces and supply demand will guide the final outcome. But, even if it does come back, why go through this delete-recreate cycle? It just means another poor soul is going to bang his head a few more days before figuring out his problem or give up trying.
    – TheMaster
    Jul 19 at 18:22
  • 2
    @TheMaster it's simply a case of, follow the guidelines and your stuff won't be deleted. Don't, and it might be... regardless of how "valuable" some might find it. It is not unheard of for old highly upvoted and blatantly incorrect or otherwise disallowed content to be deleted here on SO. you simply don't often see it because... they're deleted.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 19 at 18:23
  • 3
    @KevinB As I've explained, the plagiarism guidelines provide a leeway here. There are also deletion guidelines. I don't see how this answer would fulfill any of that criteria either.
    – TheMaster
    Jul 19 at 18:28
  • 8
    @KevinB Would you care to explain how it is plagiarism, when plagiarism is posting the work of others with no indication that it is not your own. I can see all indications that it is copied from github. (If anything, I think self promotion rules may apply, as I believe the author is the actual originator of that quote) Yes, I care about the content, but I care more about the principle. That's why I'm making the answer in meta.
    – TheMaster
    Jul 19 at 18:33
  • 4
    @TheMaster "Do not copy the complete text of sources; instead, use their words and ideas to support your own. In particular, answers comprised entirely of a quote (sourced or not) will often be deleted since they do not contain any original content." There was no original content in that answer. Nothing in the answer was by the person posting it. Therefore, there's no problem with the answer being deleted for plagiarism.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 19 at 18:35
  • 3
    You can certainly have an opinion that it shouldn't have been, given it doesn't say "MUST BE DELETED", however, that doesn't invalidate the mod's opinion that it should be.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 19 at 18:37
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    @KevinB That's not the definition of plagiarism. That is a guideline on how to copy. And I still don't get how it violates the guideline either. "Do not copy the complete text of sources; instead, use their words and ideas to support your own.".The author only quoted the relevant parts as written in "If you copy content that you did not create into something you post on Stack Overflow, make sure you do all of the following: Provide a link to the original page or answer, Quote only the relevant portion". It just so happened that in this case, there's nothing more to add after the quote.
    – TheMaster
    Jul 19 at 18:40
  • 2
    It's a guideline on what kind of content might get deleted. it doesn't need to match the internet's definition of plagiarism to be valid.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 19 at 18:40
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    I'm not sure why it's relevant that this case is not explicitly covered in the 6 bullet points in the why answers are deleted. That list is not meant to be exhaustive. e.g. Non-english answers, answers in a completely unrelated programming language, etc are not listed there either. Also, spam and rude content is not listed in those bullet points (though it is mentioned later). Answers without original content are also deleted, it's just another reason that's not explicitly listed here, that's all.
    – cigien
    Jul 19 at 21:15
  • 3
    What? SO/SE rules that are not clear?? And are associated with institutionalized arbitrary (mis)interpretation?! I'm shocked! Shocked!
    – philipxy
    Jul 19 at 21:51
  • 3
    @cigien It's relevant as they serve as a baseline of what constitutes posts that don't "fundamentally answer" the question. Spam/rude flags are covered in that article "additionally". Everyone of your list is about "fundamentally not answering the question" except the last one, "without original content". Even without "original content", if it "fundamentally answers" the question, the official guidelines doesn't support deletion. Regardless, my point here, in this specific case, is that the quote covers everything already. There's no need to add something to pacify imaginary rule breaks.
    – TheMaster
    Jul 19 at 22:30
  • 3
    Nice breakdown of the wording on the /help/referencing page. That page obviously causes confusion even among moderators. Its title is about references, yet the first word is Plagiarism! This leads to a misconception that the entire page is about plagiarism. It isn't. Then the quoted paragraph from the OP conflates two different actions: "Do not copy the complete text of sources... In particular, answers comprised entirely of a quote..." Copying 100% of a source and copying 100% of an answer are very different actions. "In particular" implies the two are related, but they are independent.
    – jaco0646
    Jul 20 at 17:05
69

The answerer is the original author of those docs. He was quoting himself.

You can click through his SO profile to his GitHub account which has the same username and profile picture. It makes sense that he's answering questions on Chocolatey, given he's the guy who made it.

Is it technically a link-only answer? Sure, in as much as it doesn't add any additional content to the docs. But what additional content is FerventCoder supposed to supply? He's already considered and answered the question in the documentation he wrote. The only information worth adding is "RTFM"

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    They could have disclosed that they are the author, of course. That does produce quite a different situation than someone random building reputation off of someone else's work. (Given the broken link, it wasn't immediately clear that they were the original author)
    – Kevin B
    Jul 20 at 2:06
  • 21
    I mean, to be fair it's all through the documentation, GitHub repo, the guy's GitHub profile, and his SO profile. You'd think deleting a +5 answer would prompt a bit more investigation than "he didn't say he was the original author in his answer"
    – Joundill
    Jul 20 at 2:09
  • 2
    Maybe that's a bit too snarky, I also understand how an answer like this could get deleted. I think in this instance it should be restored.
    – Joundill
    Jul 20 at 2:10
  • 6
    I think given the majority of the discussion that has occurred on this meta post, it's not unreasonable to expect people to not immediately make that connection, is all I'm saying. That certainly turns this into an exception
    – Kevin B
    Jul 20 at 2:10
  • Yeah, I agree. Given we've all taken the time to look into it here, I reckon it should be restored.
    – Joundill
    Jul 20 at 2:11
  • @Joundill perhaps a flag on the A explaining that, with evidence? Answer will need editing to disclose authorship though, to avoid covert self promotion Jul 20 at 2:56
  • @chrisneilsen I don't have the rep to see deleted answers. I agree with your suggestion to include authorship in an edit though
    – Joundill
    Jul 20 at 2:59
  • @Joundill then flag the Q? Make it clear you're talking about a mod deleted A, and link this Q/A for context Jul 20 at 3:02
  • 2
    To be clear, I'm not suggesting the lack of disclosure is a reason to delete in cases like this, rather, disclosure likely would have resulted in a different action in the first place.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 20 at 3:02
  • 3
    Disclosure is not required if the question is already about the product, see this relevant question Jul 20 at 4:09
  • 2
    Right, not required, however this is a great example of where providing it anyway can prevent problems.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 20 at 4:20
  • 5
    Thanks for looking into the original source of the answer. There's an MSE post about this, and the consensus appears to be that such answers are permitted. (The post is about copying an answer verbatim from somewhere else, but I expect the same to apply to copying documentation.) It also explicitly says attribution is not even required in such cases.
    – cigien
    Jul 20 at 4:25
  • 19
    "Is it technically a link-only answer?" - no, because it quotes the relevant content, and so isn't vulnerable to link rot. We call it a "link-only answer" when an answer doesn't do that, and therefore becomes useless if the linked page ever goes offline, but that's not the case here.
    – Mark Amery
    Jul 20 at 10:26
  • 14
    I updated the answer to state I am the author. Appreciate that it was restored. Jul 20 at 21:12
  • 1
    @ferventcoder we didn't ask Jon Skeet to say that he was the author of Java Time when he answered questions of Java Time. We are not going to ask you to do the same either. Authors do not need to add disclaimers, if they are answering questions relevant to what they are experts on. You are speaking from your position of expert on the topic. Now, if someone is asking how to solve a problem and you suggest your tool to solve that problem, that actually requires disclaimer, because you could be partial to your own tool.
    – Braiam
    Jul 23 at 14:22
-16

The content on Stack Overflow is licensed CC BY-SA. If the person posting an answer does not have the right to grant that license to the quoted content, that would be a problem that could justify deleting the answer.

In this case the answerer is also the author of the quoted material, so obviously they do have the right to grant the license. But that would not be obvious to someone reviewing the answer without putting some effort into tracing the source.

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    If that were a problem, then literally thousands of answers would have to be deleted. Quoting the docs as part (or even most) of an answer is exceptionally common.
    – Clonkex
    Jul 21 at 0:41
  • 5
    @Clonkex literally thousands of answers probably do need to be deleted.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 21 at 0:46
  • 3
    @KevinB In general, that's very true. But in the context of quoting the docs, I strongly disagree, whether it's legally correct or not.
    – Clonkex
    Jul 21 at 0:48
  • 5
    @Clonkex: Perhaps Mark could make a better argument, that quoting docs as part of a larger answer that interprets it is fine and closer to fair use. But just quoting them with a link, so that's the only content of your answer, is less justified. I still don't think that's a great argument, but at least it wouldn't imply that many other kinds of answers need to be thrown out. Jul 21 at 14:11
  • 4
    Referencing someone else's work does not affect the original copyright, so it's off topic to bring this up. Fair use applies regardless. The question is whether SO counts as education/research, the nature (factual), the amount and substantiality of the portion in relation to the text as a whole, as well as the effect of the use on the potential market or value of the work. If the copyright holder wants they can request a takedown notice, but I don't think we should eagerly remove it without doing some investigation. The author may support such usage and be harmed by removing it. Jul 21 at 15:48
  • 6
    Specifically, as was the case here. Many authors of technical manuals want people to read them, and do not object to excerpts. Removing all content without the consent of the author is not meaningfully better than including without the consent of the author. Takedown notices exist for a reason, often the original author approves of the use of their work and this unilateral approach of removing anything they have written is not in their interest. The moderation should involve some rudimentary investigation around the substantiality, authorship, and notifying the author so they can choose. Jul 21 at 16:07
  • @PeterCordes unless this is a forum of lawyers, I don't think we can successfully argue what constitutes fair use and what does not. Either way I don't think fair use covers granting a new license to the quoted content. Stack Overflow does not give you an option to post anything without granting the license. Jul 21 at 17:18
  • 1
    Interesting point; fair use applies when quoting a copyrighted work in your own work, and that's fine. But granting license for others to use modified portions of the new work obviously can't grant them license to the thing you were quoting. e.g. if someone posted a reaction video where they pause the original frequently to talk about it, and released it under a CC license, potentially someone could strip out their commentary and get basically the original video they were reacting to. I'm not sure which step in that process fails, legally, but I'm not sure it's the granting of a CC license Jul 21 at 17:26
  • 1
    One could argue that it's clear which parts of a CC-licensed work are actually fair-use quotes from another work, which isn't granted license. So modifications of the CC-licensed work must continue to respect the original copyright, only including quotes in ways that are fair use. That would justify answers quoting docs and including explanation / interpretation, but not answers that only quote docs. Up to you which position you want to argue, that or what you're currently saying (all quotes of docs are a problem), but the current form certainly has my downvote as non-useful. Jul 21 at 17:29
  • 1
    @PeterCordes you certainly don't seem to be alone in concluding my answer is non-useful, but that doesn't make it wrong. I think too many people believe it's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission. Jul 22 at 1:14
  • I'd be interested to see a question asked on law.SE or opensource.SE about quoting copyrighted works in a CC-BY-SA work, such as a Stack Overflow answer. And whether it's understood that clearly-quoted material is not part of what's being licensed for others to modify and so on. Jul 22 at 1:17
  • Also, I think @VoronoiPotato's point is good, that it's reasonable to assume that by default, authors of technical documentation want relevant snippets to be quoted in places where it's applicable, and are fine with this usage of their work unless they say otherwise. Legally speaking, that's on shaky ground, but I assume there haven't been any complaints, and it's a well known widespread practice to quote docs in SO answers. At this point it's reasonable to assume that authors of manuals in general at least tacitly approve this, so it's not a matter of expecting to need "forgiveness" exactly. Jul 22 at 1:22
  • 3
    @PeterCordes Something like law.stackexchange.com/questions/50205 perhaps?
    – cigien
    Jul 22 at 2:35
  • 1
    @cigien: Thanks for finding that. The opinions there all lean towards quotes as part of larger answer being totally fine. (And explaining some details like the quoted parts not being something you can grant a license to, but the implication is that readers will realize that from the quoting). And some argue that even a quote-only answer is barely ok, due to the effort of finding the relevant thing to quote and putting it in the context of an answer to a question that it answers. But that's not clearly supported for a case where it's only a single quote from one source. So a useful distinction Jul 22 at 2:51
  • 1
    I have no idea whether these kind of quote-only answers theoretically constitute copyright infringement or not, but either way, it's not our problem. Stack Overflow's approach is always to not proactively enforce third parties' copyrights, but instead to act only upon receipt of DMCA takedown requests. I think this is entirely the right approach, especially in cases where an answer is quoting public (but perhaps unlicensed) docs; even if such an answer is technically infringing copyright, who cares? The "infringement" is doing no harm to the original copyright holder in such a case.
    – Mark Amery
    Jul 22 at 12:14

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