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There are many different aspects that go into a good Stack Overflow question. Tagging correctly, making the question clear, showing effort, making it a non-duplicate, etc. At the same time, there are many aspects that go into a good Stack Overflow answer and comment. Obviously it needs to be correct, but according to the site's official guidelines the response needs to be polite and respectful even when the question is improper for whatever reason. Yet looking around Stack Overflow, the treatment a bad question receives is light-years worse than the treatment an answer with a lack of proper etiquette receives.

As someone who's relatively new to programming, I've used SO as a reference many times, and the system that's set up is great - it's guidance to help the user figure the answer out for himself. But I can say first-hand that it's not a pleasant feeling to ask a question that was thought-out and carefully constructed, or at least I thought so, only to check 2 minutes later to see a bunch of downvotes and snarky comments telling me my question is bad.

Yes, there should be some sort of explanation about why a post was bad -- and if there are no comments to that effect but there are 5 downvotes anyway that's even worse, and that happens too! -- but for people entering the computer science field to get that kind of reaction doesn't exactly encourage them to pursue this career path, even if they really are cut out for it.

So bottom line, why the double standard for question guidelines and for comment/answer etiquette guidelines, and why is it tolerated to allow so many snarky comments leak into questions without consequence, when the consequences of allowing these comments could be catastrophic?

To be clear, I'm not referencing any of my own posts, just giving an example.

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    I mean, leaving snarky/rude comments is against the rules. If you see one, flag it for a mod attention.
    – user438383
    Jul 13 at 14:05
  • 4
    The comments are not allowed, but you can't really prevent them from happening. You can flag them. But without being able to see examples, the option remains on the table that you define something as snark which really isn't.
    – Gimby
    Jul 13 at 14:05
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    Considering that I've been called "snarky" for asking a user why they want to achieve something (as it appeared to be an XY Problem) I find this hard to take this at face value. For 10K users, we would be able to see the question with a link, but at least some quotes of the comments would really help us understand what you feel was "snarky".
    – Larnu
    Jul 13 at 14:07
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    "why can't a moderator or someone vote to delete a comment" A moderator can delete comments, and users can flag them (and some flags are automatically resolved, so it's "as good as" voting to delete).
    – Larnu
    Jul 13 at 14:08
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    You don't have any questions with 5 downvotes. You have an answer with 3: stackoverflow.com/questions/72940887/… and a question with 2: stackoverflow.com/q/72955969/6296561, the former of which has zero comments, and the latter of which has comments, but only one that's borderline at worst Jul 13 at 14:08
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    @ZoestandswithUkraine I wasn't asking about my own question, and that was just an example. But I'm scared to even ask a question because of the reaction it might receive, based on other posts I've seen.
    – Michael
    Jul 13 at 14:10
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    "I wasn't talking about my own posts. " Your question disagrees "and a bunch of snarky comments telling me my question is bad." If we aren't talking about your question, why are you referencing your question? If you're talking in general, then please word your question to be more general, to avoid this confusion.
    – Larnu
    Jul 13 at 14:15
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    "yet received zero flack" Did you flag the comment? If not, why would it? Moderators don't check every single comment and post; they only deal with content they find during their normal use of the site and content that is flagged by the user base. If you didn't flag the content, why would you expect anything to happen to the comment?
    – Larnu
    Jul 13 at 14:16
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    The bar is set really high for asking questions, for certain. You have to do quadruple the effort, cross your t's and dot your i's and essentially do more research than you thought you had the patience for. If that wouldn't be the case, nobody would make an effort and you yourself wouldn't be able to say "I've used SO as a reference many times, and the system that's set up is great - it's guidance to help the user figure the answer out for himself". It'd be a pile of garbage instead.
    – Gimby
    Jul 13 at 14:17
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    @Michael You didn't flag it until now. Mods don't need flags to delete comments, but there are probably in the range of 2-5000 or more comments posted every single day. if you don't flag, then no, it likely won't be looked at and won't be deleted, because there aren't nearly enough moderators to actively monitor that many comments Jul 13 at 14:17
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    that's the system working as intended... content that isn't up to par should be downvoted, just as content that is useful should be upvoted. We get far more of the latter than the former. You'll see a lot more voting activity on entry-level questions simply because people are straining to find questions to earn rep from.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 13 at 14:23
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    Voting and flagging is different. Voting is only content rating system. It doesn't mean that the content is inappropriate for this site. Flagging means that the content is inappropriate and a mod should deal with it.
    – Dharman Mod
    Jul 13 at 14:23
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    @Dharman I mean that it has 14 downvotes, But I guess it's a moot point if I can't delete it anyway.
    – Michael
    Jul 13 at 14:39
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    You can find some explanation of what voting means on Meta here Downvotes on Meta are confusing: do they really mean poor-post quality, or just disagreement?
    – Dharman Mod
    Jul 13 at 14:41
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    @user3158591 you are missing the most common one. Upvotes meaning yes/correct/agree and downvotes meaning no/incorrect/disagree. You don't generally need 30 explanations of why something is right or wrong, 30+ votes and one or two answers more than suffice to give an idea of what the general populace thinks. So a meta post which incorrectly assumes based on very incomplete observations that there is a double standard is very likely to amass a good deal of "wrong" downvotes. And two very nice answers, what a treat.
    – Gimby
    Jul 14 at 14:29

2 Answers 2

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There's no double standard. If you see a snarky comment or an answer flag it! For comments, use "no longer needed", or "unkind" depending on whether it's rude or not. For answers, you can use "rude/abusive" if the answer doesn't attempt to provide a solution and only contains improper remarks. For all other situations, you can raise a moderator flag and explain in your own words what the issue is.

We don't tolerate impolite responses and they are dealt with if someone actually flags them.

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looking around Stack Overflow, the treatment a bad question receives is light-years worse than the treatment an answer with a lack of proper etiquette receives.

it's not a pleasant feeling to ask a question that was thought-out and carefully constructed, or at least I thought so, only to check 2 minutes later to see 5 downvotes and a bunch of snarky comments telling me my question is bad

By looking at these two quotes, I suspect that we have yet another severe conflation between content curation and moderation of user behavior.

I have said this before in a deleted Meta question some time ago, and I will say it again: Making an active, positive participation on Stack Overflow involves two important dimensions:

  • Contributing to the site with useful, on-topic content. Users with enough privileges can contribute to this by voting (up/down), editing, voting closing, and deleting questions/answers.
  • Interacting with the user base in a kind and respectful manner. Name calling, harassment, being discriminatory,... and other inappropriate behaviors per the code of conduct are not allowed here, regardless of the user's experience/reputation on the platform, and regardless of whether they are asking or answering a question. Regular users can flag comments which are not compliant with the code of conduct, and moderators are responsible for handling such cases.

Correlations may exist between the two, hence the sporadic mentions of the expression "quality creates kindness". However, every user on this site, regardless of their purpose of being here, should be concerned about both dimensions.

Now, you mentioned some outcomes which you suggest are improper etiquette:

5 downvotes

You call this to be a problem, but it is not. It only means that 5 people found the question unclear or not useful. Voting makes an assessment of quality over the content of a post, and is designed be dispassionate and frictionless. Don't take downvotes personally!

and if there are no comments to that effect but there are 5 downvotes anyway that's even worse,

Providing feedback is not mandatory for well established reasons. In the event that a question garners such a negative score, it is likely that the question is indeed in no good condition, and one should seek to improve it. There are multiple resources which can help askers in this task, such as How to ask and Writing the perfect question (by Jon Skeet).

snarky comments

Too many people seem to overlook the fact that you can flag comments for removal, and you should do so if merited. It does not take much reputation to enable this either. We cannot say whether the comment is indeed rude without concrete examples, but it is a much better strategy to flag comments and walk away from a potentially heated situation than to let it be... or let it escalate!

The idea that there could be double standards is a mere illusion or coincidence based on your observation. Curation and moderation is not completely homogeneous, since it is mostly handled by people. Taking your part in moderation is one step towards breaking this perception apart.

See also:

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