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My question: GCC/CC unable to compile C project with multiple files (mac os)

The question appeared to be quite specific but in the end I was just invoking gcc incorrectly. It got a correct answer in a few minutes, which was helpful and upvoted, so my immediate problem is solved, and that's great. I don't care about rep, and I didn't stand to get any from this question anyway, so this isn't me campaigning on behalf of my question?

I just found this dupe closure very strange. It seems like my question was closed in favor of a "canonical question" which is (in my opinion) very low quality -- essentially just a vague and brief request for general information about errors that look like mine. It has a ton of answers, but none of them would actually fix my issue, so it seems inappropriate to consider it a duplicate (unless all questions about "why is this C code not compiling" are duplicates).

I could definitely see closing it as "unlikely to be of general interest" since the answer in the end was not very interesting. It just doesn't seem like a duplicate.

I'm mostly asking to try and understand the policy. I feel that my questions are very often closed as duplicates and I don't really understand why.

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    IMO, no, that target is not a useful one, unless the question is literally asking what an "undefined reference" means. There are canonical targets for pretty much every kind of undefined reference error, and the appropriate one should be used. I've added a duplicate suggestion below your question. If a hammer sees it, and agrees, they can edit the duplicate target list. Also, that target is for a specific language, which your question is not even about, so it's definitely an incorrect target.
    – cigien
    Jun 30 at 17:03
  • It was merged (and thus suspended animation (locked)) about 4 hours later with C header issue: #include and "undefined reference". "mac os""macOS". Jul 1 at 10:42
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    This has happened to the majority of the few questions I have posted on SO (Doesn't happen on other SE sites). Down voted and closed as a duplicate in minutes with links to questions that are only weakly tangentially related, with the explanation that an answer to my question happens to be buried deep in the answers to the other question. Not at all the definition of duplicate question, but hey if that's how they want to trim their garden its not like I'm paying for it.
    – Max Power
    Jul 4 at 9:19

2 Answers 2

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No, using What is an undefined reference/unresolved external symbol error and how do I fix it? as a target for your question is not correct.

For starters, the target is for a different language, namely C++, whereas your question is about C. Many of the answers on the target don't apply, e.g. all the answers discussing templates. Also, some of the answers are actively misleading, such as the one telling you to make sure that you use a C++ compiler, rather than a C compiler.

Even if your question was about an undefined reference when compiling a C++ program, I don't think that target is appropriate. It's what is often referred to as an "RTFM target", and isn't useful unless you already know what the answer to your question is, and even then it can be tricky to figure out where that information is buried. In this case, the answer to your question is in the second to last paragraph of this answer:

It can also happen that you forget to add the file to the compilation, in which case the object file won't be generated. In gcc you'd add the files to the command line. ...

To clarify, that target is a very good quality question, and you should read it anyway (assuming you care about C++, which is not at all guaranteed since you were asking a C question). It's just not a useful duplicate target, except for questions asking what undefined references mean in general, or for questions asking for a list of causes of undefined references.

Of course, pretty much every cause of undefined reference has its own canonical target, and in this case C header issue: #include and "undefined reference" appears to be the appropriate one. It's generally not worth reopening a question just to close it with a better target, but a user with a gold tag badge in any of the tags on a question can edit the duplicate list, as can a moderator. For now, I've linked to the suggested duplicate by leaving a comment on your question.

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    I've updated the duplicate target and merged to bring over the answers.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 30 at 21:08
  • @CodyGray Yeah, merging the questions is a reasonable option. Thanks for that, and for cleaning up the duplicate answers.
    – cigien
    Jun 30 at 21:14
  • "pretty much every cause of undefined reference has its own canonical target, and in this case ... seems to be the appropriate one" How exactly are duplicate closers intended to find the matching one? How did you find this one, for example? I can't imagine it's much fun; I expect there are a lot of undescriptive and unhelpful titles, since by definition the people who asked the original questions used for the canonicals didn't know why they had an undefined reference. How do you even write good titles for something like that, after the fact? Jul 1 at 10:32
  • "Even if your question was about an undefined reference when compiling a C++ program, I don't think that target is appropriate. It's what is often referred to as an "RTFM target"" The top answer there is trying pretty hard. It's at least organized, and has a list of places to look. If I could redo the whole thing from scratch, I would make sure that one answer had just that list, with intervening text between the question titles to explain the sorts of causes, and ways to check if that is the cause. Then the explanation of the compilation model would go in a separate answer. Jul 1 at 10:36
  • (And of course, there would have to be a separate question for [c].) Jul 1 at 10:37
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For me What is an undefined reference/unresolved external symbol error and how do I fix it? looks like a valid duplicate target for your question. Its third answer is titled as

Failure to link against appropriate libraries/object files or compile implementation files

and this exactly describes the problem with command line gcc main.c -o out: it notes nothing related to help.c source file, which defines missed function.

I agree that this generic question is not the best duplicate target: the one noted by @cigien has answers which better describe the specific situation.

But I would close (or VTC) with that generic question if I miss more specific target.


In my practice in cmake tag I use that generic question as a duplicate target for every question, which exposes no attempt to link with a library and doesn't ask specifically about linkage with a library. With all respect, the line gcc main.c -o out doesn't look like an attempt to link with hello.c or its derivatives.

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    The title and first paragraph of that "third" answer (remember, sort orders are not universal or stable) are the same, and germane to the question that was asked. The rest is not; it's about C++. Yes, the author of the question made no attempt to link with the other file. That's because they didn't know they needed to do so. That was, in fact, the whole point of the question.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jul 1 at 3:15
  • Ok, C++ tag reduces validity of that generic question as a duplicate for C questions. While in the reference list of the first answer there are about half references are equally valid both for C and C++. "Yes, the author of the question made no attempt to link with the other file. That's because they didn't know they needed to do so. That was, in fact, the whole point of the question." - And it is the whole point of the referenced answer: it tells that one needs to link. This alone should give a hint, even If example in the answer doesn't fit well to the actual situation.
    – Tsyvarev
    Jul 1 at 6:59

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