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Or maybe just change the text for the existing close as typo. The current description is:

Not reproducible or was caused by a typo

While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a way less likely to help future readers.

There are A LOT of questions where the solution is very unlikely to help future readers.

The questions I'm talking about are debugging questions that fulfills two things:

  • They are about a well-known problem, like inserting in linked lists, finding the maximum in a tree, implementing a bubble sort etc.

  • The user does not seem to be interested in reading other people's code. They only want to find the bug in their particular code.

These questions rarely become good questions that help others. Often the "close as a typo" is appropriate, but it's also very common that the answer is more complex than that. And since the question usually is "What's wrong with my code that is trying to do X" rather than "How do I do X? Here is my current approach" it does not feel right to close it as a duplicate.

Can I use "close as a typo" in these situations? Or can I even close as a duplicate? If typo is not an option, should we change the description? In that case, I suggest changing the title from "Not reproducible or was caused by a typo" to "Not reproducible or the answer is unlikely to help anyone else than OP"

I think that the fact that the answer is unlikely to help anyone else is way more important than the reason (typo) behind that fact.

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  • 2
    "They are about a well known problem" Isn't it therefore a duplicate? Well known problems are almost certainly going to have a canonical duplicate candidate.
    – Larnu
    Jun 27 at 9:49
  • 1
    @Larnu Well, that's something I'm not sure about, as I indicated with And since the question usually is "What's wrong with my code that is trying to do X" rather than "How do I do X? Here is my current approach" it does not feel right to close it as a duplicate.
    – klutt
    Jun 27 at 9:50
  • well known problem would have a canonical duplicate, if not start one please. if you missd a commas semicolon and other millions of questions which such typos, you are right the ware well known, but nothing can be done. Only if there is a error message that points to the problem, you can't find them, so they are worthless
    – nbk
    Jun 27 at 9:50
  • The Q that made me post this was stackoverflow.com/q/72768809/6699433
    – klutt
    Jun 27 at 9:52
  • If the OP has attempted to implement an answer that has a canonical duplicate, and failed, then it likely can be answered, provided that it's not a typographical error. Sometimes such questions, however, are where people have "copy-pastad" the solution as in from the dupe, and not bothered to try to change it for their environment, or understand the solution. find I may well close such questions as typographical, and with a comment. A question like "I have tried to implement answer from {question}; here is my code, it isn't working: {code}" I would likely close as unclear, rather than a dupe.
    – Larnu
    Jun 27 at 9:58
  • My previous tactic was to suggest a "How do I do X?" duplicate via manual comment (to avoid dupe hammering) and let the asker or community decide. As far as I can tell now, there is little point unless you can absolutely positively shut down such questions before the first answers start being written. Jun 27 at 10:59
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    "They are about a well-known problem, like inserting in linked lists" Duplicate. "finding the maximum in a tree" Duplicate "implementing a bubble sort etc." Either a duplicate or too broad. "The user does not seem to be interested in reading other people's code. They only want to find the bug in their particular code." simple problems tend to either be typo-like (and not useful) or there would be a duplicate (very common pitfalls like if (x = 5) not doing comparison). In either case, OP's stance on which code they want to read isn't very relevant.
    – VLAZ
    Jun 27 at 11:02
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    "The Q that made me post this was" I've only read the question briefly but it seems like it's too broad. Or maybe even lacks debugging details. OP seems to be trying to do two tasks (construct a tree and traverse it) and the end result is wrong. Which suggests it's either of the two that is wrong. Or both. We can have infinite questions by adding combinations and permutations of tasks: "Why does adding to link list and getting the length show the wrong number". OP should focus on one question at a time.
    – VLAZ
    Jun 27 at 11:09
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    None of your examples are "Not Reproducible" or "Caused by a Typo".
    – Kevin B
    Jun 27 at 14:20
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    The statement "While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a way less likely to help future readers." in the typo/no-repo close reason is not intended to be evaluated separately. It is intended as a modifier to the "Not reproducible or was caused by a typo" statement. In other words, that close reason is intended as "The issue in this question was either A) not reproducible or B) was caused by a typo and was C) resolved in a way less likely to help future readers." So, it's supposed to be (A || B) && C. It's not intended as A || B || C.
    – Makyen Mod
    Jun 27 at 16:43

1 Answer 1

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Close as duplicate. Then if the Q(&A) turns out to be "very unlikely to help future readers", vote to delete.

Changing the text of the "Typo" close reason or sanctioning its usage in the way you describe would amount to give in to its misapplication. This should prompt educating the close voters, not giving in.

I'm not denying that the problem exists. Many people do close as "Typo" questions that are not typos, out of the belief that the reminder text of the close reason is what counts; or that the question hinges on something so basic or so obvious that it must be off-topic; or out of laziness.

I'll admit I have made this same mistake myself. But it's a mistake, for the simple reason that: the reminder text is just reminder text for why actual typo questions are off-topic; and if the issue is so basic and obvious, other people will face it, and having a decent canonical on this site will be helpful. If anything, it can be used as a dupe target.1

As for the reasons you point out, it doesn't seem right to address them with a "Typo" closure:

They are about a well-known problem, [...]

Then you should be able to find a canonical with battle-tested answers somewhere on the site.

The user does not seem to be interested in reading other people's code

This is their problem. Not yours. And it's not a close reason. Many users also don't read the duplicate targets for that matter, so either way you can't fix that.

[...], the question usually is "What's wrong with my code that is trying to do X"

This sounds like either Unclear or in Need of Debugging Details, or lacking Focus. Contrary to the "Typo" reason, those other three provide some actionable guidance to the poster and avoid misunderstandings like "but my code can be reproduced!" or "it's not a typo!". You know why these misunderstandings arise? Because their question is not a typo.

If the question is about multiple basic mistakes, all of them have canonicals, you have a gold tag badge and you feel like investing the time, you can close as duplicate and then edit the dupe list with all the relevant Q&As. Otherwise, close as "Needs More Focus".


1: perhaps it's plausible to come across a question depicting an issue so dodgy and weird that nobody would reasonably face it in that form. That might be an exception to what stated above, but needs evaluation on a case-by-case basis.

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