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The header banner text and link look like this (simplified):

a {
  text-decoration: none; /* from SO stylesheet */
}
Results from the 2022 Developer Survey are <a target="_blank" href="https://survey.stackoverflow.co/2022">[here]</a>.

Any front-end dev should know to never link "here". Is accessibility a priority at SO these days? What's with the brackets? Is that an attempt to compensate for poor visual link discernment?

I suggest something more like this (note the underlined link, and thanks to zcoop98 for the better version):

<a target="_blank" href="https://survey.stackoverflow.co/2022">Results of the 2022 Developer Survey</a> are now available.

I admit that I'm not a regular assistive tech user, so maybe I'm off the mark. I have had some training, though, and consider it a personal priority in my work. This came across as inaccessible and a bit unprofessional to me.

In response to comments and Joy's answer...

It doesn't really matter what "here" means. A user browsing with a screen reader and scanning links gets no context with that. They hear something like "hyperlink here" instead of "hyperlink Results of...". It gives them no information about the link reference.

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    It would help reception if the question mentoned that such links fail F84 of WCAG's success criterion 2.4.9 explicitly. I'd like to mention that, by itself, such a header does not fail it, however, there is nothing in the link itself that would satisfy #3 of the procedure, so yes, the title does not meet accessibility guidelines. Jun 22 at 15:29
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    I'm more familiar with basic good practice than various WCAG or government (Section 508) standards. Feel free to integrate that if you like.
    – isherwood
    Jun 22 at 15:31
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    What about "Results from the 2022 Developer Survey are now available"? I agree that the accessibility could be improved, but I also think it's worth noting that the current wording seems to use "here" as are now available, rather than are in this location (which the linked guidance frowns upon), even though it can be read in both ways.
    – zcoop98
    Jun 22 at 16:06
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    That would also work nicely. The key is that the link contains text which describes its reference. Doesn't really matter what "here" means. A user browsing with a screen reader and scanning links gets no context with that.
    – isherwood
    Jun 22 at 16:35
  • (The used tag "Accessibility" says: "Questions related to the usability of Stack Overflow by people with disabilities. Accessibility of websites means that people with all kinds of disabilities can use those websites. An accessible Internet provides equal access and equal opportunity to people with diverse abilities. Accessibility covers a broad range of components, including content, browsers, assistive technology, ... . It affects users, web developers and software developers. An overview of accessibility standards is available at W3C's Web Accessibility Initiative.") Jun 23 at 17:06
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    The banner has now been updated, and Joy has updated her answer accordingly.
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    Jun 24 at 15:10

1 Answer 1

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Update: We have deployed a fix that makes all the text in the announcement banner a link.

enter image description here

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    That's completely irrelevant. To repeat myself, doesn't really matter what "here" means. A user browsing with a screen reader and scanning links gets no context with that. They hear something like "hyperlink here" instead of "hyperlink Results of...". It gives them no information about the link reference. That's all laid out in the article I included in my question.
    – isherwood
    Jun 23 at 14:33
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    An explanation I like comes from Yale: "While screen readers can read a full page to a user, screen reader users may prefer to instead listen to a list of links. In that case, a screen reader may only read the link text and not the surrounding text." Having choices like "here", "this page", "link", "look!", etc doesn't mean anything out of context.
    – Laurel
    Jun 23 at 16:10
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    yeah, I'm not getting this answer...it's obviously missing the point of "accessibility" that was explained in the question
    – Lamak
    Jun 23 at 16:20
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    Please whatever you do Joy, don't take this as feedback that somehow Meta is trying to bully you here. It's simply the case that, in this instance, the way that this link is structured is not generally accessible for someone who leverages screen readers. For those who are exclusively limited to screen readers, hearing this phrase would introduce confusion and make it harder for them to navigate. We're not here to antagonize you or anything, but we want you to recognize that this sentiment is incorrect (and should be followed up on).
    – Makoto
    Jun 23 at 19:05
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    Perhaps a better explanation is: Screen readers have multiple navigation modes. One such mode is "links", in which they can navigate through every link on the page. In this case, they'll only hear "Link, here, double tap to activate" - and have no idea what that link is for, because the only description they heard was "here". To find out, they'd have to switch navigation modes and then move backwards.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jun 23 at 19:20
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    Appreciate the clarification folks and the intent of the comments. I did misunderstand the discussion. I put in a request to have someone from the engineering side of the house address this topic.
    – Joy Staff
    Jun 23 at 19:47

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