44

With the demise of job postings and the developer story, there isn't really any "build careers" part of Stack Overflow anymore, is there? It is time to update the slogan?

23
  • 41
    But careers can be built just by using the site and learning skills from this usage. Having said that, I have to wonder if this might be somewhat of a pedantic debate, like asking for the number of angels dancing on the head of a pin. Jun 15 at 2:18
  • 8
    And just because jobs is gone, doesn't mean SO has lost "leverage" with employers. There's still a number of companies that consider SO reputation when hiring, tying rep straight to career building. Some recruiters also browse users on SO to find people to hire Jun 15 at 7:20
  • 24
    @ZoestandswithUkraine Can you list some of those employers please? Asking for a friend... Jun 15 at 9:14
  • 6
    @AyxanHaqverdili I once applied to a cloud hosting company and they asked for my SO profile to check on my rep (I did not get the job, for other reasons). Not sure why it seems so unbelievable that employers would look at that.
    – Laurel
    Jun 15 at 11:29
  • 25
    Having "build careers" because it might indirectly help your career makes about as much sense as "make friends" would in the same context.
    – khelwood
    Jun 15 at 11:42
  • 16
    Its a marketing slogan, so it doesn't really have to make actual sense :) It just needs to sound funky.
    – Gimby
    Jun 15 at 12:47
  • 2
    but but SO reputation can help you get a job, right?
    – Kevin B
    Jun 15 at 14:33
  • 2
    Maybe. But idiots like me can build up a pretty decent amount of rep. Jun 15 at 15:45
  • 1
    It lasted 5 years: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/351540/…
    – Marco13
    Jun 15 at 16:03
  • 2
    @Marco13 Your link cites a doozy of a comment from SO's "product manager on the new Developer Affinity and Growth team" (at that time in 2017, with my emphasis added): "Developer Affinity = Developer engagement and love. Our team's charter is to continue building on the love that developers have for SO. Our team is still new and in the early stages, but it is safe to assume our plans will include improvements in the Q&A experience that provide compelling value for signing up and staying signed in". I can't imagine them trying that hogwash now.
    – skomisa
    Jun 16 at 6:32
  • 3
    @khelwood Having "build careers" because there are job postings makes about as much sense as "build houses" does on a real estate agent's website. Jun 16 at 14:21
  • 2
    What I'd want: "where developers compile, debug and build programs". What would suit better: "where students beg, steal or borrow their homework".
    – Lundin
    Jun 17 at 7:01
  • 4
    "Where developers come to get roasted"
    – S. Dre
    Jun 17 at 9:31
  • 2
    @Lundin I've never compiled any programs on StackOverflow. Does it support C99? Jun 17 at 11:10
  • 3
    "Where students outsource their homework"
    – Michael
    Jun 17 at 13:46

3 Answers 3

28

The current phrase is a slogan that's displayed as the main site title and (to me) feels disconnected from reality, which was invented by someone from SO and pushed through without asking the community. So if you're asking for an update, you're practically asking for the SO marketing department or management to invent a new slogan.

Disregarding the fact that there is no need to update a slogan, as it has no effect on how the site works and was never anything but feel-good fluff, I think precedent shows that SO has little interest in community input here. The current slogan was decided without any community consultation, and IIRC the community wasn't even given any notice that the slogan changed. Furthermore, given that SO ignored the community outrage when they rolled out the front page changes, along with many other complaints about similar endeavors (e.g. the blog, #soreadytohelp, "social" features), I doubt anything meta says will have an effect on how SO marketing operates.

That said, if you want to spend time to make up a new slogan and propose it to SO, feel free to do so. You could create a new meta Q/A pair for a slogan contest and we could all vote for the least bad option (using words such as "good" for marketing fluff would be a stretch IMO). If anybody at SO would care about that is however not answerable by the community.

7
18

Stack Overflow was a factor in getting me my current job, even without the assistance of the job board. The interviewers were impressed with my contributions to the site.

7
  • 18
    It might also work against you, showing that you spend vast amounts of time doing Stack Overflow stuff instead of working :) Me personally, I keep my Stack Overflow account completely detached from my work. It's personal data as far as I am concerned, nobody needs to know.
    – Gimby
    Jun 15 at 14:25
  • 15
    I mention my rep (small as it is, still top 6% which impresses folks who don't realize the shape of the rep curve) on my resume, but no link or my handle here. I list it under "Community and Volunteering," because this is quite literally volunteer work in an online community.
    – TomServo
    Jun 15 at 17:17
  • 1
    @TomServo I can understand not mentioning SO on your resume at all, and I can understand linking to your SO handle in your resume, but I can't understand choosing to mention SO on your resume, but deliberately remaining anonymous. How is that helpful for the person looking at your resume?
    – skomisa
    Jun 16 at 6:18
  • 2
    @skomisa Those who've asked about my contribution here have always asked something like "cool, what do you focus on there," etc. Kind of like, "oh you volunteer your time to charity ___ , cool," and then move on. No one has ever asked for my handle to research my profile and answers. At the level I'm at (tech exec, 32 years in the business, bought my first computer in 1979), people probably just consider it a charitable hobby. If I had 200,000+ rep it might be different. I sometimes claim, "My hobby is more technical than the role I'm interviewing for. Smiling, of course. :)
    – TomServo
    Jun 16 at 11:47
  • @skomisa I don't think it's any less helpful than "I have x years doing y". It shows you have experience and allows them to ask more questions about it if they wish. Which if they're interested is good for you and you haven't had to give away personal information (like if you'd asked a question on workplace about an issue you had at work)
    – Sam Dean
    Jun 16 at 11:49
  • @SamDean It's a fair point that if you give the prospective employer a link to your SO handle, they can read absolutely everything that you have ever posted, or at least everything which is still accessible. I hadn't considered the issue from that perspective.
    – skomisa
    Jun 16 at 13:06
  • @Gimby, as long as we tell the employers we won't be using their time to moderate SO or post here on SO (unless its something work related which is very rarely allowed to be posted on SO and that too, at least in my case, needs a separate account) we should be fine. What we do on our personal time is none of their business. Jun 16 at 14:19
6

I did a mid-career pivot into Software engineering primarily based on maintaining an open source software product. And Stack Overflow was the primary place I learned how to find the information I needed, how to properly apply best practices, and what problems the community was trying to find software to solve.

So yes, I built my career with significant help from Stack Overflow, and continue to do so as I expand my career in new directions.

2

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .