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There are these developers nowadays that follow the no-code principle: the development is done without writing any code.

What is the current status about this way of development. Does Stack Overflow cover such Q&A? How inclusive is the site to such users?

Is asking for code appropriate as long as the person asking is a no-code developer?


In my understanding - which is far from a leading definition - a no-code developer is a developer not writing any code. I come more and more to the conclusion that this is off-topic on SO as it is about writing code:

Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers, people who write code because they love it.

from: https://stackoverflow.com/help/on-topic

But English is not my first language. And it can make a difference if "people who write code because they love it" is the specialization of "professional and enthusiast programmers" or an additional group.

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    As long as it is "programming", code is never a requirement for questions on SO. Though, for those who are not really familiar with no-code development, could you provide some related examples on SO, like existing tags or questions?
    – Andrew T.
    Jun 5 at 12:19
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    Is a no-code developer someone who doesn't write any code but asks volunteers on the internet to write their code for them?
    – khelwood
    Jun 5 at 12:28
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    Also, 'inclusivity' reads like a lead-in to allegations of (racism, misogyny, anti-trans, [insert you favourite woke buzzword here]), should anyone disagree:( Jun 5 at 12:35
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    If the person is a no-code developer I don't understand why they are asking for code. What good is code to someone that calls themselves a "no-code" developer; surely such a person wants no code. Perhaps I don't understand what a "no-code" developer is, but such a scenario sounds contradictory.
    – Larnu
    Jun 5 at 12:40
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    I have no idea what a "no-code developer" is. Does it mean someone who uses a visual programming language, where it is not necessary to write code? That's still on-topic, as long as it's programming. When asking questions on Meta, just like on the main site, you need to include all relevant details and context in order for others to be able to understand the question and its motivations.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5 at 12:42
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    Then if they are asking for code, surely they aren't asking a no-code question... The background of a person asking a question is completely irrelevant to the quality and "on topicness" of a question; so if they are asking a coding question why is the fact they are a "no-code" developer relevant?
    – Larnu
    Jun 5 at 12:45
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    Are you perhaps under the impression that asking for code is off-topic on Stack Overflow for "normal" developers? That's not the case.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jun 5 at 13:04
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    "found no code" doesn't mean they are a "no-code" developer, @hakre . At best it suggests that they searched the problem and found no similar solutions they could adjust for their own environment. Honestly, you're connecting to completely unrelated dots in my opinion. I, when I get stuck, frequently search for examples of similar scenarios; if I don't find a related solutiont that doesn't make me a "no-code" developer; far from it.
    – Larnu
    Jun 5 at 13:04
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    Where does code only answers come into this?
    – Larnu
    Jun 5 at 13:07
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    And what do questions asking for code have to do with no-code developers?
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jun 5 at 13:09
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    Honestly, at this point, I would really suggest you edit your question to explain what a "no-code" developer is; I am honestly none the wiser after some of your comments, and possibly more confused.
    – Larnu
    Jun 5 at 13:13
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    When you say "a developer not writing any code", do you mean that they're using a language like LabVIEW or Scratch that doesn't actual involve writing code, but assembling building blocks? Or do you mean developers that copy-paste code from the internet instead of writing it themself?
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jun 5 at 13:23
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    Users aren't off topic here, @hakre , questions are.
    – Larnu
    Jun 5 at 13:49
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    Who the user is has nothing to do with whether their question is on topic or not; @hakre . I, as a DBA, doesn't mean I can go to Database Administrators and ask the best way to cook egg fried rice... The same applies here; a cook can come to Stack Overflow and ask about programming.
    – Larnu
    Jun 5 at 13:57
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    "No-code" and "low-code" (platforms) are well established terms and should not be conflated with anything else (it causes too much confusion). For instance, a no-code developer should only mean someone who uses one of the (notable) no-code platforms. Jun 5 at 16:13

2 Answers 2

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Is asking for code appropriate as long as the person asking is a no-code developer?

Wrong question.

  1. Asking for code is allowed. As long as it formulated to be on-topic. Questions that ask "How to do <something>" are among the most popular on Stack Overflow.
    Who asked the question is irrelevant. An on-topic question is on-topic regardless of the author.

  2. If a no-code programmer asked a question about code, there is a chance it is an XY problem. No-code platforms and approaches do not lean on code (as the name implies).
    Asking for how to solve a given problem X is probably a better approach. Asking for code might be the Y.

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I don't think we have an inclusivity problem. SO, and its volunteers don't discriminate at all based on the background of the person asking a question.

Good questions get answered, bad questions get closed. The person asking the question is not relevant, only the content being posted is evaluated.

One could even be a welder, or a rocket pilot, as long as their question follows the SO standards, it will be well received.

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    "bad questions get closed" I know what you meant, but I'm not going to let that stop me from nitpicking the wording. Bad questions can be downvoted or simply ignored, but they aren't necessarily closed. Only questions that fail to meet our specific requirements are closed.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5 at 12:47
  • @CodyGray: Thanks for the reference again, no-code is off-topic then: "people who write code because they love it." In my understanding a no-code developer is not writing code.
    – hakre
    Jun 5 at 13:02
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    I still have no idea what you're trying to say, @hakre. "Code" is generally used as a synecdoche for "programming" and/or "software development". The site's scope is not intended to be limited to people who are literally writing code. Visual programming languages are also on-topic, as is architecture, algorithms, etc.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5 at 13:53
  • I beg your pardon, but I need a more easy language. The on-topic description scopes the user-group both as programmers (which likely matches what you say?) and then specializes to "who love writing code". So if a visual developer is asking for written code because she loves writing code = site is for her. If a no-code developer is asking for written code and they dislike writing code = site is not for them. At least this is my current understanding.
    – hakre
    Jun 5 at 13:59
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    First off, there's no "who love writing code" in the definition of what is on-topic for the site. Marketing-speak on the homepage doesn't define our scope. Second, that's not a "specialization"; at best, it's an intensifier or metonym, but it's really just a throwaway phrase someone thought sounded cool. It implies nothing. As you've been told repeatedly, but for some reason ignore, the site doesn't care about people. They're not relevant to the scope. I simply cannot believe that you genuinely are this confused about the site's scope. @hakre
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5 at 14:10
  • Oh, hopefully the site cares about people, it surprises me a bit to read from a mod it would not, to say the least. And just for clarity, verbatim it is: "people who write code because they love it.".
    – hakre
    Jun 5 at 14:21
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    This site cares not at all about people. Not even a tiny little bit. By design and since the beginning, the site has only ever cared about content. And that quoted phrase still doesn't appear in the Help Center pages that define the site's scope. @hakre
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5 at 14:52
  • Maybe you get a different page here: stackoverflow.com/help/on-topic , or you use different names for it or whatever. That is the one I quoted from. Be it homepage, help-center, marketing or whatever - only related to the reference you kindly shared.- And I can't imagine a moderator can speak for the company or override its legal obligations. Nor that these sentences were just written down without thinking about other topics than marketing. Lets leave it as-is.
    – hakre
    Jun 5 at 15:00
  • Oh, sorry; I finally see what the confusion is. Yeah, that phrase doesn't belong there, and the wording is sub-optimal. I will fix it.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5 at 15:02
  • And then you will tell me, you're totally not in a conflict of interest. The force for moderators must be really thin... .
    – hakre
    Jun 5 at 15:03
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    I don't understand what that means. I was trying to explain to you the site's rules and how they are meant to be interpreted. You found a place where the official guidance was misleadingly worded and causing you to think something else. I had missed that nuance, because I'd read the page so many times and already knew what it was trying to say. After realizing what the issue you'd noted was (sorry it took me so long), I fixed it. Isn't that the whole point of posting on Meta?
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5 at 15:06

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