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The specific answer: https://stackoverflow.com/posts/209854/revisions, which is the top answer on a very popular question, How can I make a dictionary from separate lists of keys and values?.

The changelog shows repeated attempts over the past three years to remove noise and clarify how the answer works to solve the problem. I was just about to make a change manually that would have amounted, essentially, to "rollback to revision 9", when I randomly decided to look in to the edit history (it seemed strange that there was a recent edit on an ancient answer that left noise behind).

How should I handle this sort of situation? Is it appropriate to ask the author in the comments for a reason to resist these changes? I'm not sure I'd accept one anyway. I have read What to do when a high-rep user is willfully breaking site rules/meta consensus? but I didn't manage to extract useful guidance from it.

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    That's hardly a rollback war. Jun 1 at 19:02
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    If soneone doesn't like your edits let it be and make our own answer
    – nbk
    Jun 1 at 20:57
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    "Is it appropriate to ask the author in the comments for a reason to resist these changes" - suppose so, I am yet to get a single reply out of doing this on a rare occasion where a rollback is so bizarre, I need to ask for clarifications. In any other instance it's just better to mod-flag explaining the situation and moving on with your day. Jun 1 at 21:44
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    What do you mean by "I'm not sure I'd accept one anyway."? Accept an explanation defending the roll-backs? Or something else? Jun 1 at 22:58
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    Yeah, I don't know what explanation could be offered that would convince me that it's a good idea not to include an explanation of how dict and zip work together to make the solution work. Jun 1 at 23:11
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    I am the author of the answer in question. Which specific changes are you objecting to me having rolled back? It appears that the "noise* you are objecting to is Voila :)… is that so? 🤨
    – Dan Lenski
    Jun 2 at 6:07
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    If we are at a level where we are calling "Voila" noise, zip certainly does not create a list of (key, value) tuples.
    – ayhan
    Jun 2 at 11:22
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    Exactly, @ayhan. The reason I have reverted a couple of past edits is that they don't add accurate, useful, and clearly-explained information… and the example you cite is an example of such inaccuracy… in addition to removing my one-word, one-emoticon enthusiastic aside.
    – Dan Lenski
    Jun 2 at 13:03
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    @ayhan zip(keys, values) does create an iterator of (key, value) tuples. (Not list, admittedly.) I think it's much more helpful to beginners rather than "...zip function are awesomely useful". But I might be a bit biased since that edit was mine. :-) Jul 6 at 6:57
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    @DanLenski my take was that "awesomely useful" is not explanatory, and the overall sentence comes across as an excuse to shoehorn in the reference links without a clear motivation. I would greatly prefer to have a (technically accurate) summary of how the code works, rather than simply praising the power and elegance of the Python builtins. Jul 6 at 7:04
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    While we're being pedantic, zip isn't a function in 3.x; it's a class. The returned value isn't a generator object, but an actual instance of that class. Jul 6 at 7:11

2 Answers 2

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Leave it as it is. It's not the worst noise there can be. There are much worse posts in need of editing. If the author wants this answer to remain in the current style then don't change it.

When we remove noise, we should try to focus on the egregious ones, e.g. signatures, "regards", "hope it helps", "let me know if this works". Of course, feel free to edit any post you want if you think you can improve it, but if it's only some small change and the author disagrees, leave it as they want it to be.

In situations where you removed obvious noise and the author insists on keeping it, flag for mod attention. Don't go into rollback wars. Don't engage the author yourself.

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    Okay, but what about the explanatory text? Jun 1 at 18:36
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    I mean, there's certainly noise that was removed with the edit,
    – Kevin B
    Jun 1 at 19:05
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I think calling "voila :)" noise is rude and if I were in the author's shoes I would likely also rollback. The difference between Stack Overflow and a wiki are the signatures. The answer's author seem to be signing with his real name so I think it is not wrong for him to be a little territorial about his answers. He may feel that the rewrite alters the tone of the answer too much, is not in line with how he would have expressed himself, and thus do not want to have his signature attached to text he didn't write.

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    Every bit of the end is noise, not just "voila :)"
    – Kevin B
    Jun 2 at 21:08
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    For clarity the bit at the end is "Voila :). The pairwise dict constructor and zip function are awesomely useful." I disagree with calling it noise since it does not interfere with the transmission of the communication. Jun 2 at 21:43
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    Signatures thank you and similar also don't interfere with the transmission of the communication, but are always considered noise.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 2 at 21:50
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    Relevant to the answer, points out the succinctness of a pattern, specifies the names/roles of the things used in the answer (a constructor and a function) and links to the official documentation. How is that noise?
    – ayhan
    Jun 2 at 22:46
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    Those 2 links and the explanation aren't, and moving them to the top while removing the rest of the noise improves the content. We can certainly keep the bits worth keeping while removing noise.
    – Kevin B
    Jun 3 at 1:26
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    Then the "noise" is "Voila :-) ... are awesomely useful." We can let users add such flair to their answers without endangering the quality of Stack Overflow. Jun 3 at 7:53
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    @KevinB My interpretation is that there isn't actually any explanation in that version beyond the links - unless you count "dict is a constructor" (really, a type, which in Python is callable to instantiate the type) and "zip" is a function" (incorrect, incidentally). It's evident from context that both are callable anyway. The linked documentation explains what happens when you call them. That is still miles away from explaining why, when you use the two things together in this specific way, it solves the problem. Jul 6 at 7:08

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