43
votes

Thanks to everyone who took the survey! The 2022 Developer Survey is now closed, and the results are available here. (Also see the announcement on the blog.)


The 2022 Developer Survey has opened today! Whether an active member of the Stack Overflow community or not, we encourage everyone who codes to participate and make their voice heard. The survey will be open until June 1, 2022.

Take the 2022 Developer Survey here!

Thanks in advance for your time, and additionally, thank you to everyone who gave us feedback on our listed technologies for this year's version!

As happened in previous years, any user who completes the survey in its entirety will earn the Census badge. You will have the option to get the badge on Stack Overflow or on a different technical site in the Stack Exchange network.

Anonymized survey results will be available publicly under the Open Database License. You'll be able to download and analyze the dataset later this year. Specific survey answers are treated as personally identifiable information and therefore excluded from the anonymized results. These questions are highlighted in the survey with a note saying, "This information will be kept private." Free-form responses are also excluded from the public data.

If you use security or ad-blocking plugins, you may see error messages. Our third-party software provider, Qualtrics, does not work well with certain ad blockers and security software. To avoid error messages that prevent you from taking the survey, please try specifically unblocking Qualtrics in your plugin or pausing the plugin while you take the survey. Additionally, as a reminder, Qualtrics blocks certain countries from accessing their site and data: Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Syria, and the Crimea region of Ukraine (including Sevastopol). In addition, some users in China may have issues due to restrictions imposed by local internet service providers.

If there are any bugs, questions, or concerns, we encourage you to add them to this post as answers.

Thank you!

35
  • 66
    "How favorable are you about blockchain, crypto, and decentralization?" Why isn't that 3 separate questions?
    – Cerbrus
    May 11 at 13:35
  • 8
    Also,: Objection, relevance! (I learned a thing or 2 from the jonny/amber case)
    – Cerbrus
    May 11 at 13:45
  • 20
    Fishy URL, how do we prevent people from thinking this is even more spam?
    – Lundin
    May 11 at 14:04
  • 14
    How is that url fishy? The survey is hosted by Qualtrics, and the link is provided by a staff member...
    – Cerbrus
    May 11 at 14:21
  • 9
    I would never have heard of Qualtrics but for Stack Overflow using it, and the URL includes unnecessary query parameters for tracking purposes (to me, utm_* is not just fishy, but demands an edit on sight). May 11 at 18:56
  • 29
    If you're worried about those utm_ parameters, you're better off just disconnecting yourself from the internet... I mean, let's have a look at the information they're tracking: utm_source=so-owned&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=dev-survey-2022&utm_content=meta-take-the-survey They're tracking that you're coming from a SO-owned source, which is a "post", namely this post. How on earth is that problematic? You're providing SE with more data by commenting and answering here!
    – Cerbrus
    May 11 at 21:18
  • 8
    @Cerbrus <targetsite>.<nonsense>.<someothersite>.com is a standard pattern used by phishing scams to trick people into thinking it's a genuine <targetsite> webpage.
    – OrangeDog
    May 12 at 7:37
  • 8
    @OrangeDog subdomains have also been used to provide more personalised URLs by some service providers. This isn't really new. Yes, spammers have also used it but if we want to avoid anything spammers have used to trick people, we need to just shut off the Internet.
    – VLAZ
    May 12 at 7:54
  • 7
    So, it looks fishy because they're using a known domain by a known survey provider they used before... Cool
    – Cerbrus
    May 12 at 8:07
  • 6
    @KarlKnechtel: are you seriously complaining a company is using a survey service from a company that specializes in surveys, instead of re-inventing the wheel themselves? If you're that upset about people knowing where you clicked the link from, just copy the link without the tracking parameters! It's not that hard.
    – Cerbrus
    May 12 at 16:51
  • 10
    It's your choice to block JS, which means you have to accept that there will be pages that won't work for you. You're free not to want to submit anything to the other domain. But again, that's your choice. It's absolutely ridiculous to expect SE to develop survey software for a survey they hold annually. That software is not just the form you're looking at. Data storage, analytics, everything that comes with it.
    – Cerbrus
    May 12 at 17:03
  • 6
    Frankly, if you want to be that paranoid that you're blocking JS, why on earth do you desire to give anyone the kind of information the survey asks for? And vice versa, if you want them to get that information, why on earth are you blocking JS? That's so 2000's
    – Cerbrus
    May 12 at 17:07
  • 8
    No, you're just using the scorched earth approach to privacy, while there are so many less-intrusive alternatives. Adblockers and other script blockers; network filters; firewalls; userscripts...
    – Cerbrus
    May 12 at 17:10
  • 5
    I kind of agree with what Karl is saying, @Cerbrus. Yes, it might be unreasonable to expect otherwise given the state of things as they are, a simple fact that we consider that an adblocker, VPN, and a script blocker is pretty much a norm when venturing into the net is... very wrong. Rephrasing their point, it is reasonable to want a company controlling one of the largest knowledge bases in IT to be able to roll out their own survey with graceful degradation (I don't know when it changed, but I remember the times when "it doesn't work without JS" was considered a cardinal sin of web dev). May 12 at 17:19
  • 11
    @Oleg sure, one can hold that opinion. But to justify that with toxicity such as Karl is displaying, I can't agree with. ("they apparently can't implement a simple survey", "disrespect for my privacy", "they think they can swindle me") It's unconstructive, and doesn't exactly lend his argument strength. The perception of JS changed over the last few years because of SPA's, increased standardization and security, and alternatives to utterly blocking JS, as I mentioned before.
    – Cerbrus
    May 12 at 17:24

27 Answers 27

107
votes

How favorable are you about blockchain, crypto, and decentralization?

Why are these three grouped together? Blockchain and crypto are both typically decentralized, yes, but it's perfectly possible to be opposed to crypto, and still be in favor of decentralization, for instance.

At least move decentralization to its own question, or make all three separate choices.

15
  • 70
    The question is also completely out of place in the rest of the survey.
    – Cerbrus
    May 11 at 13:53
  • 8
    Block chain as a technology is really neat. I see a great future in it. Blockchain as it is currently being used... Reminds me too much of tulips. May 11 at 18:25
  • 29
    It should probably be "cryptocurrencies" and "decentralized finance" - crypto and decentralization generally are unrelated.
    – Ryan M Mod
    May 12 at 0:18
  • 6
    Exactly! "Blockchain" is a cool tech, and (in the absence of anything further), I feel most people agree with that. "Crypto" is the controversial part. And "decentralization" is just an unrelated word. I had the same reaction when I saw this question: terribly phrased. May 12 at 15:46
  • 1
    @RyanM Could it be clarified then...? For example, I might like and support a decentralized web (IPFS, for one example), but not support cryptocurrency. I'd appreciate it if it was clarified to refer to decentralized finance/currency specifically if that is what is is referring to, as opposed to decentralized something.
    – cocomac
    May 12 at 15:55
  • Ironically, decentralized web (at least the type IPFS defines) is a specific form of decentralization that would probably need its own, separate entry May 12 at 15:58
  • 3
    @cocomac I'm just a moderator, not staff :-) nothing I can do except comment and upvote Zoe's answer, and I've already done both.
    – Ryan M Mod
    May 12 at 16:02
  • 8
    Easy enough to answer: I'm not favourable to any form of buzzword-barfing without context.
    – Lundin
    May 13 at 9:35
  • 3
    Git is decentralized and so is email or torrent.
    – aloisdg
    May 13 at 12:23
  • i guess we need more time to understand the boundaries between all those terms... we blend them but blockchain is a base technology on which cryptocurrencies sit...web 3.0 and desentralization are an independant (but related) affair.
    – Victor
    May 13 at 17:04
  • 1
    all of the above, also: I'm maybe oldschool, but for me crypto stands for all things cryptology, not just techbro coins. Also I'm salty because in my field of work we talked about web 3.0 for a few years now and meant the semantic web, linked open data, and not...that
    – cypherabe
    May 17 at 14:40
  • 3
    I came here to say exactly this, I'm fully in favor of decentralization as it has been working excellently for decades in email, git et al; I'm not convinced blockchains are that useful, but I'm open for arguments; and crypto (if we use the term this way) is just a giant pyramid scheme which centralizes power to a few VCs May 17 at 15:42
  • 1
    I'm just putting "unsure" to mean "I don't understand the question".
    – wizzwizz4
    May 24 at 17:23
  • @aloisdg: I like those examples for highlighting the absurdity of this question. "How favorable are you about email, git, and decentralization?" Jun 16 at 17:55
  • We understand that this question could've been split into 3 separate questions. We've looked at the individual parts in other surveys: we first asked about blockchain in a survey about a year ago, then did another one on Web3 in Mar/Apr of this year. For the purposes of the Dev Survey, we balanced the need for wanting to ask a broad audience about this topic with the need to not have an overwhelming number of questions - that compromise was asking a single question that encompassed many items. If we include similar questions in future surveys, we'll make them less ambiguous given this feedback
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:36
52
votes

The same two categories of "Worked in PAST year" and "Want to work with NEXT year" were used as the last survey. I want to say that this is not a clear enough information to draw conclusions from. This was already brought up multiple times last year with concerns that the information can be misinterpreted:

https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/407941
https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/407926
https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/407943

And later it turned out that it was misinterpreted by losing any sort of nuance and declaring that if somebody worked with a technology in the past but have not indicated they want to work with this in the future, they dread that technology.

Let me give an example: I have worked with Java in the past. I do not want to work with Java in the future. That is not because I fear it but I am mostly indifferent. My current position has almost no Java involved. If something does come up and I need to work on Java, I will without hesitation. It is just not something I would seek out to do by myself.

There are many other valid reasons to not want to work with a technology in the future. If I were to change fields and start learning and developing in a new language, I would not expect to come back to what I used in the last year. Again, that is not related to fear but pure practicality.

I fear this year the same would happen. Please stop trying to impose meaning on data.

6
  • 19
    This! If SO wants to differentiate between Loved, Dreaded, Wanted technologies, they should just add such named checkboxes next to each technology. Any similar conclusions drawn from this question as it is stated right now is completely unreliable. May 12 at 9:48
  • 3
    I had a similar problem. Working with C doesn't fill me with untold joy, but it's required in my role and I do it without comment. It felt very strange to have a question comparing the past and future, but with two different criteria. I feel like I wanted all four options, [past-want, past-required, future-want, future-required]
    – Korosia
    May 12 at 14:17
  • 2
    @Korosia or how about "What is the feeling of this technology: hate it, love it, indifferent" (or similar)? I feel like giving users actual way to describe their feeling is superior to just imposing one. That's what happened last year. In previous surveys, we could pick our attitude to a technology more directly.
    – VLAZ
    May 12 at 14:20
  • @VLAZ Yes, that would have been a good option
    – Korosia
    May 12 at 14:55
  • When we introduced this question series in 2015, we said "By comparing status quo vs. aspiration we can see how developers perceive available programming tools." The questions and the way we look at the data do reveal a perception of the technology. While the terms Loved, Dreaded, and Wanted are strong terms to describe the emotions felt, and the questions as posed don't directly map to these emotions, we've felt they are lighthearted enough that people understand that developers don't run away from the Dreaded technologies, but aren't making excuses to build more things with them either.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jul 7 at 16:34
  • That being said, we're planning on revising the framing of the question and data that comes out of it for future iterations of the Dev Survey. Plans aren't defined yet, but our initial thinking is that we'll show results using the old/historical way and a new way(s). This way we're able to introduce something new, while not completely removing data points that people currently reference/track. Thanks for the feedback!
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jul 7 at 16:35
44
votes

The wording of the "Which of the following Stack Overflow sites have you visited?" question does not make sense terminology-wise. Collectives are not sites at all. Teams barely fit into this category on a technicality. There does not exist1 such a site as "Stack Exchange" (we, established users, know that it refers to the network, but for an outside observer this is wholly confusing).

Please, call the Collectives and Teams what they are — products, as well as disambiguate the "Stack Exchange" option, something along the lines of "Other Stack Exchange network sites".

screenshot of the "which of the following Stack Overflow sites have you visited?" question with Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange boxes ticked


1 Apart from the stackexchange.com site, of course, but it's not what the question asks about.

8
  • 12
    "There does not exist such a site as "Stack Exchange"": stackexchange.com would like to know your location. May 11 at 13:17
  • 6
    @NickstandswithUkraine yeah, I did not mean the network site literally :) Since from the context they are asking about the network sites, stackexchange.com does not make sense as an interpretation (but I think we do not disagree here) May 11 at 13:26
  • 2
    If we assume "Stack Exchange" means the wider network, then is it a "Stack Overflow site" as the question says?
    – VLAZ
    May 11 at 13:35
  • 3
    @VLAZ ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ May 11 at 13:42
  • 2
    i was hoping the question would be followed up with whether or not i wanted to work with any of those sites in the future
    – Kevin B
    May 11 at 16:08
  • 2
    Why are collectives and teams even options, if they're both stackoverflow?
    – Kevin B
    May 11 at 16:13
  • 1
    This is how we have framed this question in past surveys. But we agree that it should be revised and will be updated in future surveys.
    – David Gibson Staff
    Jun 22 at 22:42
  • The wording here definitely needs some tightening, @DavidGibson - many use SE and SO interchangeably, many others don't even know what "Stack Exchange" is, etc. It would also be cool if the survey linked to /all-sites in the "other Stack Exchange sites" option - that alone is likely to provide more visibility to other sites of the network (provided it's desireable). Jun 23 at 6:35
42
votes

The professional developer series question is unclear.

It states that a survey happened, somewhere, to some unknown group of users with who knows what actual questions/available answers that even the blog post doesn't get into, and then asks if we want to participate in the Professional Developer Series... but neither the question or the linked blog post even begin to explain what the "professional developer series" is. Is this a newsletter? a survey list? a work group? something else?

5
  • 2
    Agreed. Would be nice if they could clear this up on the actual survey.
    – QHarr
    May 12 at 5:29
  • 6
    So what is it? I do not know, I couldn't find anything on google.
    – KamilCuk
    May 12 at 8:18
  • I was also confused by this, but my assumption is that it's just an extension to their regular survey. In other words, if you select yes, you get more questions. If not, the survey ends. But I didn't test this.
    – Clonkex
    May 13 at 0:54
  • 1
    It's not exactly an extension of the main survey, as there appears to be no way to change your mind. I said yes and was immediately asked whether I'm a people manager or individual contributor. I'm both, but that wasn't an option. I selected one, went forward, and decided I didn't want to participate in that section after all. While I could go back to previous pages, within the extended section I could not go back past the first question about being a manager or IC to opt out again. Unfortunately, I think closing the tab would have discarded my entire survey submission…
    – Chris
    May 13 at 10:24
  • 1
    We understand that this survey section was not clearly introduced. If we do another professional series we will ensure that the text is more clear.
    – David Gibson Staff
    Jun 22 at 22:47
26
votes

Select boxes are very hard to read:

Image showing drop-down with black text and very dark grey background

Win11 Pro 64-bit, FF101.0b3 (64-bit), dark mode.

7
  • 2
    When you hover over them, at least for me, the text turns white. But this is just poor design really!
    – Luuklag
    May 11 at 13:24
  • 1
    Weird, they looked fine on Chrome...
    – Cerbrus
    May 11 at 13:43
  • Sounds like a dark mode thing. No repro in FF 100, Linux Mint 20.3, light mode (OS, browser, and SO) May 11 at 13:45
  • 3
    Same on macOS 12.3 dark mode, Firefox 100
    – greg-449
    May 11 at 13:51
  • 20
    Thank you for flagging! After inspecting it appears that this is an issue with dark mode and Firefox. We will reach out to Qualtrics (our surveying system) to see if there is a fix we can implement.
    – David Gibson Staff
    May 11 at 14:06
  • I saw the same on FF on Windows and I don't use dark mode.
    – shoover
    May 12 at 19:39
  • 1
    Same on macOS 12.3 dark mode, Chrome 101.0
    – Tom
    May 12 at 21:52
24
votes

It's time to address the elephant in the room. Let's go through the list of responses on the question collection Q&A and see if they have been addressed. But before doing so: please change the process of evaluating the suggestions to align with the established process of how other projects are discussed with the community (after all, we are your backbone).

Processed concerns should get one of the , , , or . It is a huge waste of contributor time to have them go through the responses manually, and seeing that a lot of them to be simply ignored (or, interpreting this with a highest benefit of the doubt possible, forgotten about).

Without further ado, let's dive into this year's responses (cutting off at score 3 as there are way too many items to process):

As can be seen, the score seems to be not the only contributing factor in choosing what to add and omit, so what's the criteria? If you expect engagement from us, we expect engagement back, at least in terms of responding to what will and will not be included in the survey.

Granted, there is an "other" field, but it only exacerbates the problem unsurprizingly brought up in the top-scored answer, as well as makes the choice of technologies that did make it to the list rather arbitrary.

6
  • 3
  • As the author of the answer you link, you might find it interesting to note that I did not bother inputting any technologies in the "other" list when I filled out the survey. If the authors of the survey cared about such technologies, they would have asked about them.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    May 17 at 21:25
  • Those technologies don't have potential sponsors
    – Kevin B
    May 17 at 21:37
  • Thanks for bringing this up, and for going through the feedback post to compile a list of what was accepted and what wasn't. We agree that our process for going through feedback has been somewhat arbitrary, and not particularly transparent. To address that, next year we plan to more actively [status-?] tag the posts providing suggestions, and to do a better job of explaining the rationale behind accepting or rejecting suggestions.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:11
  • Additionally, we're planning on coming up with logic that is clearer with regards to how the initial list is even generated for some questions that are less clear than others, which should also help the community understand why some techs make it to the list and others don't.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:11
  • "! Oleg will remember that". Joking aside, thanks, providing reasoning as to why something made the list or not will go a long way (especially given that many of the items that did not make the list are part of SE's own tech stack, which is... bizarre), @JNat. Frankly speaking, though, I am not sure why we even need a predefined list of technologies. If that puts too much strain on the analysts?, clearly defining the criteria for making it to the list would help, IMO. Jun 23 at 6:30
23
votes

What's with these intervals? From 1-2 times a week to never? What about 1-2 times a month? None of the options fit my case. I don't interact outside my team very often (maybe once or twice a month) but when I do it's usually because of knowledge silos.

enter image description here

7
  • Yes, it shouldn't only be the two integers in the interval [0; 1] (averages are implied). May 13 at 10:21
  • 3
    The question "How frequently would you say you visit Stack Overflow?" has the five options "Less than once per month or monthly", "A few times per month or weekly", "A few times per week", "Daily or almost daily", and "Multiple times per day" May 13 at 10:34
  • 2
    I skipped these questions because I did not find any of the answer options to apply.
    – Ryan M Mod
    May 17 at 2:54
  • I would have expected the options to get as infrequent as a "few times a year".
    – BSMP
    May 17 at 8:25
  • 1
    I ended up rounding to the nearest, which was "never". May 17 at 20:51
  • @RoddyoftheFrozenPeas As did I.
    – Clonkex
    May 17 at 22:29
  • 1
    Thanks for the feedback! We still don't know if this section will be a part of future surveys, but will take this into consideration if it is.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:20
22
votes

What are the primary version control system you use? Select all that apply.

This is worded weirdly - when I read "primary" followed by "version control system" (singular) I assumed that it was a typo, and it should have been:

What is the primary version control system you use?

until I read to the next sentence. Clearly multiple choices are permitted (I was able to select more than one), so the question should refer to "version control systems", not "version control system":

What are the primary version control systems you use? Select all that apply.

2
  • 1
    Same thing for the Operating System question. It's singular, but multiple-choice.
    – OrangeDog
    May 12 at 9:03
  • 2
    (...Avoiding the pluralization issue, it could also be rephrased to: "What version control system(s) do you primarily use?")
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    May 17 at 16:15
22
votes

That's cool and all, but... what happened to interesting questions?

I may have missed some post or response where staff already covered the topic, but this is the third year in a row where not even a single remotely interesting question has surfaced. The length of the survey is ok and the questions are also ok (more or less). I could personally do without demographic questions, which I skipped, but I understand could be considered of interest to the company.

You have lots of actually interesting questions to choose from, even just looking at past years' suggestions (before you completely stopped asking for suggestions, meh). Why not just pick one or two?

Especially this year, I would have loved to check results about topics like salary expectations, remote working, work week schedule, etc.

9
  • 7
    People kept complaining about the length of the survey; it makes sense that they'd drop suggested questions.
    – BSMP
    May 11 at 17:53
  • 1
    @BSMP one interesting or funny question surely does not add much to the survey length, does it? They used to do it years ago. May 11 at 18:00
  • 26
    Interesting that they apparently thought "are you biracial or multiracial, or a member of an ethnoreligious group?" is a more interesting question than ones that have to do with one's work environment as an employed programmer. It's hard for me to reconcile this with a claim to being interested in, you know, programmers and programming. Last I checked, people of any race, ethnicity or religion are capable of writing code. May 11 at 18:50
  • 6
    @KarlKnechtel yeah... I too feel like a lot of the demographics questions could be replaced by far more interesting ones. Honestly though, I wouldn't mind the questionnaire being twice as long if the rest of the questions were actually interesting. May 11 at 19:29
  • 9
    @KarlKnechtel That does not mean people of all races etc have equality of access in tech or get treated in the same way. Slightly defensive response from me as I know this survey doesn't really inform those discussions. At best it gives a measure of self-reported race, within the defined categories, who completed this survey.
    – QHarr
    May 12 at 5:37
  • 5
    "That does not mean people of all races etc have equality of access in tech or get treated in the same way." Doesn't mean the opposite, either. But more importantly, survey questions like this don't help do anything about it. They only feed the misguided mindset that measurement of a disparate outcome is evidence of disparate treatment, much less by any specific entity. Worse, they get used to assign responsibility for those outcomes in nonsensical ways. May 12 at 16:36
  • Keeping registers of what race the users of the site belong to, for unknown purposes. Not questionable at all...
    – Lundin
    May 13 at 9:43
  • @Lundin the problem here is...it's not even "race". I've no idea what it is but it includes "European" and I'm not aware of such a "race". It also has "North American" which makes it very questionable. Is it supposed to be residency? But it's missing Australian, then. It also has "indigenous" which lumps together native Americans with native Australians. Rather different set of peoples from two different continents. And if it's "race" then what is Dr. Dre - North American + Black? Or just one of these? If just Black, then is Eminem just White? Thinking about the question gives me headaches.
    – VLAZ
    May 13 at 11:20
  • 3
    And so the term "race condition bug" was invented... :)
    – Lundin
    May 13 at 11:40
16
votes

Something that stood out to me that I didn't take a screenshot of, but the education question had the following phrasing:

Professional doctorates (ex., M.D., J.D.)
Other doctoral degree (ex., Ph.D., Ed.D)

I get what the authors were going for, but the usual distinction between doctoral degrees is between research doctorates and professional doctorates. To imply that a research doctorate is "other" compared to an MD or JD is going to raise some eyebrows.

3
  • 1
    Further, in most cases, an Ed.D is a professional doctorate. It prepares for a professional position in education; there are also Ph.Ds available in education that have more of a focus on a research career. Of course academia varies a lot so those generalizations are not always true for everyone's degree program, but it makes little sense to separate them the other way unless you don't think education is a profession worthy of being "professional", like doctors and lawyers. May 13 at 22:30
  • @BryanKrause Agreed, in most cases the EdD is a professional doctorate. There's also been a trend in recent years for the research EdD to be migrated to the PhD (ex., HGSE eliminated the EdD in favor of a PhD or the EdLD tracks).
    – rjzii
    May 16 at 20:10
  • Thanks for the feedback. We'll look into how to better phrase these options for next year.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:19
15
votes

To the first question I responded none of the above: I do not consider myself primarily a developer by profession, but as a research student most of my job involves programming, so none of the options seemed to apply straightforwardly. To my shock, the survey abruptly ended after I gave this response, and it seems to have permanently locked me out of the developer survey. I consider this a great pity: I enjoy contributing to the survey every year, and I do program a lot, so my opinion should be valid here. Could this be fixed please?

(Suggested remedy: split ‘none of the above’ into two options, e.g., ‘I code but am none of the above’ and ‘I do not code’. Also, I’d like to be readmitted into the survey if possible.)

4
  • 2
    For the record: To get the survey again, you need to clear the cookies belonging to the qualitrics site.
    – VLAZ
    May 12 at 4:21
  • 1
    @VLAZ Ah, thanks! (Though I’m not sure that sort of thing should be said publicly…)
    – bradrn
    May 12 at 6:07
  • 8
    I'm not sure it's a great secret. That's how most session tracking works.
    – VLAZ
    May 12 at 6:09
  • Thanks for the feedback, and apologies for the confusion around this one. Given your circumstances, the most appropriate answer would've been "I am not primarily a developer, but I write code sometimes as part of my work," wherein "work" refers to both professional and academic work. We can make this clearer next year by making the option read "I am not primarily a developer, but I write code sometimes as part of my work/studies" or something along those lines.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:17
14
votes

Another year has passed and nothing has changed. Again this year, I got the same response for trying to take the survey:

You don't have permission to access "http://stackoverflow.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5jeoE1pq9sFcwIe?" on this server.

Reference #18.9a743217.1652370335.372d8a7e

I am still speechless. I won't take any other attempts in the future as I figure it out everything will be still the same. It should not happen, but it does.

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    "As in previous years, Qualtrics blocks certain countries from accessing their site and data: Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Syria, and the Crimea region of Ukraine (including Sevastopol). In addition, some users in China may have issues due to restrictions imposed by local internet service providers. This is unfortunate, and we can do nothing about it. We’ve continued to research alternatives, but so far have found no alternative that provides a cost effective alternative, considering the work we’ve already put in to configure Qualtrics."
    – Cerbrus
    May 13 at 5:27
  • 1
    (Source)
    – Cerbrus
    May 13 at 5:27
  • @Cerbrus If that's the case couldn't they try using a VPN to access the survey?
    – user692942
    May 13 at 8:19
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    They absolutely could, @user692942
    – Cerbrus
    May 13 at 8:20
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    I can use a VPN solution, but... what's the point? I am exhausted of doing so. Likewise, I am tired of pretending to be else where like New York, Montreal, Paris, Brasília, etc... exhausted of all that political bull shit interfering in every single aspect of our lives. I have always heard about the open free Internet and every day as times passes by I just see more and more restrictions. That's what I feel every time I'm faced with that "Forbidden access protocol". May 13 at 23:41
  • As noted in the comments, this was pointed out in the original post as a limitation of the platform we chose to host the survey. The comments also point out workarounds that would allow you to fill in the survey. We understand that having the need to come up with a workaround can be frustrating itself, but unfortunately we haven't been able to come up with a solution that provides a cost effective alternative, considering the work we’ve already put in to configure Qualtrics.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:21
11
votes

Approximately how many people are employed by the company or organization you currently work for?

Once again this question is here but it is not clear how to answer it.

The top level group of companies I work for has thousands of employees around the world.

The current company of the group I work for still has thousands of employees around the world.

The programming portion of the company has maybe few hundred people total in a few cities. I am not sure exactly how many are there.

The concrete department I work for has less than a hundred people split into several teams. I work with a subsection of those teams others I know mostly by name.

The concrete team I work for has around 15-ish people.

Finally, the office I am in is administratively separate from the office of the rest of the team. There is 4 people assigned to work here. Yet, that has no impact on the day-to-day job for the team - we are considered the same unit for all tasks related to work.

What of these is the question asking for? If any. Most of the people I have met are from the programming portion of the company and maybe a few that are in the same building. Depending on which thing the question asks, the answer is from 10 to 10k+. Or am I supposed to pick "I don't know"?

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    "employed by the company" How many people have the same company name on their contract? If you don't know how to answer it, then "I don't know" seems like a fitting answer...
    – Cerbrus
    May 11 at 13:39
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    Well, I don't know how to answer it. Is it all of the companies in the same group? People wouldn't have the same company name in their contract but they would be working for the same entity. If we go by literal company name then I literally do not work for the same company as the people on my team I collaborate every day with. It's a slightly different corporate entity for my office for administrative purposes but we are considered the same as the other office. I guess it's an "I don't know" then, since I've no clue what the survey is asking for.
    – VLAZ
    May 11 at 13:50
  • They're asking about your employer so the department/team options don't make sense here. As for whether to use your company or the parent company, that depends on your situation. When I worked for a state university, I would consider the university my employer even though I was a state employee. But if your parent company is in the middle of doing away with the branding for the company you work for then it might make sense to just go with your parent company. They're most likely looking for whoever signs your paychecks.
    – BSMP
    May 11 at 17:42
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    The real answer here is "this barely matters" - it's a standard market research question that's older than the Internet; if you want to be nice, whatever gives you the largest number.
    – Shog9
    May 11 at 17:54
  • @BSMP I mentioned the department/team since they are different administrative entities within the wider company. I technically work for <Company> yet their main business is nothing to do with software development. I was hired through <Company> Software Development. Which is a separate entity but internal and thus not well known outside <Company>. I then signed a contract to work for <Company> Widget Software Development subdivision. Also a separate thing. However, my paycheck goes through with <Company> Widget Software Development <Office B>. Budget comes from <Company> Software Development.
    – VLAZ
    May 11 at 17:56
  • I still think the company name that's on your paycheck makes the most sense; that's the company the government considers your employer and the name most likely to show up in a background check. But if you really don't want to go with that you can always just go with whichever company name you put on your resume. And of course, "I don't know" is a valid answer.
    – BSMP
    May 12 at 10:38
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    I mean, you could also just choose to answer it however you want, as it's going to be interpreted in whatever way they want anyway
    – Kevin B
    May 12 at 16:01
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    I didn't get this question on my survey.
    – shoover
    May 12 at 19:42
  • Wow, big company! I work for a very small company so it was easy for me to answer, but in your case I would just use whatever level of the company is on your payslip.
    – Clonkex
    May 13 at 0:52
  • If you are in a large enough organization that the answer is not obviously "less than 100" then you're in a big, administratively complex organization, no matter how many companies the lawyers organized you into.
    – tripleee
    May 21 at 18:49
  • Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate the source of confusion here, and we'll take it into consideration next year, and try to make the question less ambiguous by including "if part of a holding company, how large is our primary company?" or something along those lines.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:13
11
votes

On the question What online resources do you use to learn to code there's an option Programming games. Does that mean "Games where you learn to program" or "Creating games"? At first I thought it probably meant the former but the more I think about it the less sure I am.

enter image description here

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    Why would it mean "Creating games" though? :) That's just out of context. It is "Games where you learn to program" May 13 at 8:13
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    I stumbled upon that as well (non-native speaker). Eventually I figured it out for the reasons @OleksandrNovik mentioned May 13 at 10:07
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    @OleksandrNovik It seemed a reasonable possibility given that that's exactly how I learned to program.
    – Clonkex
    May 14 at 11:06
  • I would assume it's the former, as "creating games" isn't an online resource, whereas "games that teach you to program" can be. I agree that this phrasing is confusing, though.
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    May 17 at 16:20
  • @V2Blast My confusion is that I've never actually seen a "game where you learn to program", so it wasn't clear if that's a normal thing that people do. That's why I got stuck. Like wtf is a game where you learn to program?
    – Clonkex
    May 17 at 22:29
  • @Clonkex: Based on Googling games learn to program, it seems there are quite a few. Basically, the game presents problems to solve (often with some sort of story as a framing device), and basically has you write code to solve those problems.
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    May 17 at 23:41
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    I agree additional clarification would be beneficial. I will update on future surveys if this question is included.
    – David Gibson Staff
    Jun 22 at 22:52
8
votes

In the ethnographic question "Which of the following describe you, if any?" options "Biracial" and "Multiracial" show up twice:

List of possible options where "Biracial" and "Multiracial" show up twice. Each of the four options is ticked.

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    And what is the source of these groupings? Surely there are some official categories that exist? Does this come from one of them?
    – QHarr
    May 12 at 5:31
8
votes

Middle click/drag to scroll toggles checkboxes

This caused me to accidentally select a few languages that I hadn't intended to. Tested on Firefox on Windows 10.

screen recording of middle-click/drag selecting languages in the survey

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  • Thanks for pointing this out. We'll investigate with Qualtrics on this one.
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:23
7
votes

I would like to take the survey, but as a Tor user, I cannot access it. All Tor IP addresses appear to be blacklisted. Is there a way around this, or are Tor users simply out of luck?

Many people use Tor to bypass firewalls or get around national censorship. Since Stack Exchange hosts the official Tor Q&A site and supports Tor officially, it would be nice if SE/SO's 3rd party survey host supported Tor as well. While some people may be able to use VPNs for the same purpose, not everyone is able to do so.

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  • Yea, use a VPN instead.
    – Cerbrus
    May 14 at 6:48
  • (Also, this is related to this earlier answer)
    – Cerbrus
    May 14 at 7:14
  • 2
    We'll investigate with Qualtrics on whether there are technical reasons for this restriction, or if it's something we have some flexibility for future surveys. Thanks for bringing it up!
    – JNat StaffMod
    Jun 22 at 16:22
4
votes

The description for the Census badge badge says it can be earned multiple times. However, after completing the survey, I get this screen without getting a badge:
Thank you for taking the survey without a badge

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    Hmmm, I got shown a page that said it will be awarded shortly... then got the badge 5mins or so after. May 12 at 6:45
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    Did you take the entire survey, or did it kick you out early on? What was the last question you answered before it went back to this screen? Per Gino's screenshot, if the system thought you were eligible for the badge, it would have displayed an additional message. Here, it didn't think you were eligible for some reason.
    – animuson StaffMod
    May 12 at 18:16
  • @animuson, I remember I finished the whole survey. May 12 at 19:51
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    Sorry about that. I manually awarded your badge for this year's survey. Thanks for filling it out!
    – Adam Lear StaffMod
    May 20 at 17:05
  • @AdamLear is the badge supposed to be awarded on the same day? I completed the survey almost a month ago but I realized I still don't have it. When I click the survey right now, I see the message "You have either already completed the survey or your session has expired." (Sorry if it's not the correct platform to ask this question, you don't have to answer, I just clicked this post as it was bumped to the front page and saw this answer). Jun 15 at 2:29
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votes

On narrow screens, questions for "Worked with in PAST year" / "Want to work with in NEXT year" have the last option in a weird semi-collapsed state. The down arrow indicates that it is collapsed, but two clicks are required to expand it - one to properly collapse it, and one more to expand it. Expanding other entries fixes the collapse state of the last entry too.

Which programming, scripting, and markup languages have you done extensive development work in over the past year, and which do you want to work in over the next year?

...

Reproduced on Firefox 100.0 on Windows 10, and Chrome 100.0.4951.41 on Android 12.

3
votes

It would be nice to have a textbox for free text in order to give you ideas/comments/tips about the Stack Overflow site, the survey, and any other thing that crosses our minds.

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    Yes, every survey ought to have one or more free text fields at the end. There isn't one in this survey (only for some of the individual options). May 13 at 11:03
3
votes

Why is the survey still open when it was announced to close on June 1? (I just tried on a different browser and it is allowing me to start to answer the questions.)

When are the results expected to be posted?

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    This is a good question. I finished the survey on June 2 according to my badge, after seeing a link to the survey on stackoverflow.co (the business oriented domain).
    – Laurel
    Jun 14 at 19:59
  • Apparently it's closed now.
    – Laurel
    Jun 16 at 10:50
3
votes

There is a bug in the close message, it states:

We're sorry, but the 2019 Developer Survey is now closed. See you next year, when we launch the 2020 Developer Survey.

I think it should be:

We're sorry, but the 2022 Developer Survey is now closed. See you next year, when we launch the 2023 Developer Survey.

It would be also cool to have a link to the results, or to something similar.

here is the image of appears to me now: wrong years

2
votes

Salary number input doesn't take separators such as space or '.

It is not good for cheap national currencies, where numbers have many trailing zeros.

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    That's probably because the characters used as thousands and decimal separators vary wildly between countries, so if someone wrote their answer with a decimal place it could be difficult to reliably identify whether it's meant to be a thousands separator or decimal separator, which could significantly throw off the data.
    – Clonkex
    May 13 at 0:40
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    @Clonkex I wonder what kind of employee calculates salary precisely enough to have less than 1 unit of currency (like 38 cents) May 13 at 11:48
  • Just... count the amount of zeroes you're inputting... I mean, 1000000000 isn't exactly difficult to type precisely.
    – Cerbrus
    May 14 at 7:13
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    This is another limitation of Qualtrics that we have found. But we will raise this with their team.
    – David Gibson Staff
    Jun 22 at 22:49
1
vote

enter image description here

I'm assuming this means "when you're in college and have internships, don't count those as professional experience". But what about those of us who worked part-time while attending school (I was leading web ops at a company before graduation)? Or people who were contractors on the side (I know a few who paid their way through school like this)?

Perhaps "How many years have you coded professionally as part of your full-time work?" is what's meant?

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    that's "professionally".
    – Kevin B
    May 12 at 18:04
  • It just means "not including any time you spent at school or university learning to code, how many years...".
    – Clonkex
    May 13 at 0:43
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    As Clonkex said, the question's just asking about coding "professionally", i.e. in a work capacity, as opposed to coding for schoolwork. If you worked part-time while attending school, that work would be counted in this amount, but you would not count time you spent coding for schoolwork (at a time when you weren't coding for a job).
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    May 17 at 16:23
0
votes

As a non-native English speaker, I had to look up 'onboarding'. Even then I am not entirely sure of its meaning. A short explanation would have been nice.

I also had trouble with 'observability tools', but that was on a technical level. I think that a product like the 'PRTG Network Monitor' (which we use to monitor things like server tasks, VPN, toner levels, to name a few) is not an observability tool, but I could be wrong.

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votes

This is the first time I was about to answer this survey this year. I don't remember any earlier attempt. But right after answering the first question, I was shown the following screen and not allowed to go further. WHY??

Survey message

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    Without knowing your browser/version as well as any add-ons and privacy settings, who can say?
    – BSMP
    May 17 at 19:31
-5
votes

How frequently would you say you participate in Q&A on Stack Overflow? By participate we mean ask, answer, vote for, or comment on questions.

This question is a bit ambiguous without some time constraint(s), e.g.:

  • Over the last 30 days? Over the last 90 days? Over the last 365 days? etc.
  • Over Q1 of last year? Over Q2 of last year? etc.

If the intention is to ask about an all-time average, I'm not sure how meaningful that is considering my activity has changed significantly over time. Activity trends seem more meaningful.

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    The answers were time constraints weren't they? wanting the avg over my lifetime would be useless data.
    – Kevin B
    May 12 at 18:26
  • That's unrelated. For example "Multiple times per day" is one option, but over what time period? For me, that options was true a couple months ago but not this month.
    – tdy
    May 12 at 18:29
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    Why would information related to my activity a year ago, compared to activity this week, be more important than activity this week? Last years survey was for last year.
    – Kevin B
    May 12 at 18:29
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    In the end this data is going to be aggregated and used in whatever way(s) they want to make whatever claims they want. Answer it in the way you want your data point to be represented.
    – Kevin B
    May 12 at 18:32
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    "Answer it in the way you want your data point to be represented" Again, unrelated to my point. The question itself is ambiguous. My answer is completely different if we consider the last 30 days, the last 90 days, or the last 365 overall. Sure I can arbitrarily decide what I think they meant and answer it as such, but that doesn't make for a good survey question.
    – tdy
    May 12 at 18:35
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    Given that it is the 2022 survey, maybe it's intended to mean "activity over all of 2022" but again, my activity has been very different even over the past year alone, which is why I also suggested breaking it down by Q1/Q2/Q3/Q4.
    – tdy
    May 12 at 18:39
  • it's literally asking for how you would describe your usage. They already know how much you actually participate.
    – Kevin B
    May 12 at 18:39
  • 1
    "it's literally asking for how _you_ would describe your usage" And I'm explaining why it's hard for me to describe my usage given the wording of the question and options. If you don't have any issues answering this question, please just move on.
    – tdy
    May 12 at 18:47
  • 3
    It's written present-tense. They mean "currently" or "recently".
    – Clonkex
    May 13 at 0:45

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