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I have a question about my Stack Overflow post: How to set formatting for just a time duration in a Google Sheet using appScript?

This was my first post ever on this site. After making the post, I noticed a nice little blue box notifying other users I'm a "New contributor", so "Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering."

So, one of the first comments by Cooper that I got was:

Please provide minimal reproducible example your example is not reproducible because we have no way of knowing what is in e.postData.content

I'm brand new to this site, and even brand new to coding. I wasn't exactly sure what they needed to make this a "minimal reproducible example", because the JSON I created came from another program, and is created using a ton of code. So I edited my post and added one function from the outside program (the one that makes the actual HTTP POST request to my script), and also added the relevant snippet from my JSON string that shows what I'm working on in e.postData.content.

The user then told me: "Again it is still unreproducible so I'll just move on to another question, if you can't provide minimal reproducible example". And I'm pretty sure they "downvoted" my post. They gave no further information on what they were looking for. (My post has been edited yet again to just show the JSON snippet, as I realized that should be all that is necessary to make a minimal working example.)

I am going on to work on something else now — I found this post. The user also replied to that post, but was more informative, requesting specifically to see the JSON, and what was and wasn't JSON. But for me, they asked for a minimal working example, and when I "didn't provide what they were looking for", downvoted my very first post, making it impossible for me to seek more help.

Is this the "care" for "New contributors" that this community offers?

Is my question a noob question? absolutely! I'm a noob! But we all start somewhere...

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    Please beware of the meta effect, which very likely will get your linked questions (heavily?) downvoted.
    – richardec
    May 7 at 20:17
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    Cooper was trying to help you get your question answered. You don't know who downvoted your question, it could've been anyone. The only one in here being hostile, at this moment, is you yourself.
    – Cerbrus
    May 7 at 20:17
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    What are you trying to get out of this meta question? At the moment, it reads as only a rant, even after removal of the toxic language... That's why this is getting downvoted.
    – Cerbrus
    May 7 at 20:22
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    Nobody is shutting you down. You're putting way too much value into a single downvote. You were being hostile. Look at the lines I removed from this question... Those aren't exactly friendly. Sure, you're new to SO, but you could just ask what you did wrong, instead of going on an all-out offensive against SO.
    – Cerbrus
    May 7 at 20:25
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    There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a "noob". However, the easier it is for anyone to reproduce the problem you're experiencing without much effort, the more likely they will be to help you. If you have trouble coming up with a minimal, reproducible example, try viewing your question on another computing and image you were trying to answer it. You'd probably begin by copy/pasting and running the code...but you can't do that if all the variables, etc., aren't provided. That's what Cooper was getting at. It seems like your 3rd edit provided that information, so I think it looks fine now
    – richardec
    May 7 at 20:27
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    You're throwing around accusations... That's not a "discussion". And that is why this is getting downvoted. Note that (down)votes on Meta don't affect your account in any way.
    – Cerbrus
    May 7 at 20:27
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    It easily could not have been Cooper who downvoted; no user knows except the user who did downvote, Cooper, and the Stack Exchange staff. Also, keep in mind that the downvotes are very, very far from personal. Remember that Stack Overflow has several thousand questions a day, so likely whoever did downvote your question looked at it only for a moment and moved on to other ones as soon as possible. In the review queues this is often the case. Many, many users are looking at lots of different posts very quickly and judging them in a short time.
    – richardec
    May 7 at 20:36
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    As you seem to be mostly complaining about the downvotes, remember this: 1 or 2 downvotes matter very little. A DV doesn't mean you're a bad contributor, it means someone had a problem with your question in some aspect. If you've tried your best to understand criticism and correct your post, you've done the right thing and you don't need to get too concerned about it. I myself, who am a relatively high-reputation user (13k), get lots of DV on my questions, though I know they're in fact good and better than plenty of questions which don't get DV'd.
    – richardec
    May 7 at 20:41
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    Truth is, in a way, you're right, the community can appear to be rough on newbies to the site and newbies to programming, and it is most definitely not easy to ask a well-received question when you're new to the site. Given the shear volume of questions and new members, it is impossible to mentor or guide newbies through the ins-and-outs , and your best bet is to study the site guides, to keep working on question writing skills and to harden yourself to the possibility that you still may get harsh criticism and down-votes. May 7 at 20:43
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    @HovercraftFullOfEels Thank you, this is really great to know.
    – user7907243
    May 7 at 20:46
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    @HovercraftFullOfEels Not only that, but answering other people's questions actually helps you become more proficient in a given technology/topic/etc as you research new techniques and ideas to help them, especially in areas outside of your day-to-day. Maybe it differs for some but I've learned loads more answering questions than asking them. May 7 at 20:47
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    On an off-note: the "new contributor" note has nothing to do with the community. It was imposed by the company during the period when they completely out of touch with the site goal and the community. This is probably going to sound harsh, but we are not a site to learn coding. We are a knowledge repository (see the Tour which you read in 2017), and every post is a contribution to it, so there are standards one needs to uphold, in particular, providing an MRE for debugging questions. May 7 at 21:09
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    What we also are not is a forum (quoting from your post on main). To reiterate, we are a repository. May 7 at 21:12
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    I mean, if I was into drawing conclusions, what might I make of 'I'm brand new to this site, and even brand new to coding' from a JSON developer who has been an SO member for 5 years? May 8 at 7:33
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    What I'm trying to explain is that I did not know what he needed to make it a minimal working example. This is something you can test yourself when writing your question. You should be able to reproduce the problem you're having using only the information you put in the question. If you have to use code/data/etc. that is missing from the question to recreate the problem then that needs to be added.
    – BSMP
    May 9 at 4:45

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