0

I am just curious why this question was closed as "needs details or clarity". To me it seemed the task was clear, it even attracted 4 answers.

13
  • 10
    Is there no fitting duplicate for such a basic question? Why does this question need to be answered at all.
    – BDL
    May 6 at 7:09
  • 4
    Seems entirely clear to me, really.
    – Ryan M Mod
    May 6 at 7:11
  • @BDL maybe it is hard to find a duplicate, it is somewhat specific question May 6 at 7:19
  • 5
    @GiorgiMoniava I'm not even a js programmer, but it took me less than a minute to find two targets: stackoverflow.com/questions/69462167/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/48329551/….
    – BDL
    May 6 at 7:20
  • @BDL Your first suggestion isn't exactly the same (contains objects and has some additional tasks) but it is close. Your second suggestion, doesn't even have an answer, which is not downvoted. May 6 at 7:23
  • 5
    Anyway, I reopened it. It could probably use a better title. Feel free to continue the search for duplicates, of course (and remember, duplicate closure can go either way: the canonical should be the better one, not necessarily the older one).
    – Ryan M Mod
    May 6 at 7:35
  • 30
    "it even attracted 4 answers." when this happens in a really short amount of time, it usually indicates that there should be a duplicate. Because it's a very simple question, if people can answer within minutes, thus it's most likely been asked before.
    – VLAZ
    May 6 at 8:01
  • 1
    hm meta is a strange place, despite many agreeing that specified close reason wasn't adequate, still got negative score. May 6 at 11:31
  • I think despite the specific close reason being inadequate, there was still an adequate close reason you didn't choose: voting for a duplicate.
    – VLAZ
    May 6 at 11:57
  • @VLAZ I already explained that, question seemed too specific to me to look for a duplicate. I might have even tried few times. But this meta post wasn't about that. May 6 at 12:03
  • 9
    Grouping and summing is "specific"? You believe never once in the last 14 years has such a question been asked about JavaScript? There are so many questions about this. And the answers are always very similar to each other: loop through and keep keep track of which the unique property of the objects is. Then for each match merge the objects by summing other property/properties. That operation is definitely not "specific" nor "unique". Using an array rather than objects barely has an impact, yet we also have a bunch of questions of doing this with 2D arrays, as well.
    – VLAZ
    May 6 at 12:15
  • @VLAZ Yes, the fact that it was 2D array made me feel it was specific perhaps. With objects that operation is more common. I don't plan to explain this any further. May 6 at 12:20
  • I'm not going to address everyone's points, but I can share a bit about why I did what I did. I am a novice dev who thought the reduce method could not be used (which is wrong). I myself had created a solution with a forEach in a forEach in a forEach, but it got so messy that I didn't trust it anymore. I searched for similar questions for about 30 minutes. I always try to make my questions as simple, concise, and straightforward as possible without including all the noise from my personal situation. My question is not worded well and comes across as lazy.
    – Fabian
    May 6 at 16:15

2 Answers 2

11

Let's get a couple of things out of the way first:

why this question was closed as "needs details or clarity"

The initial closure as "needs details or clarity" was incorrect. The question is, indeed, has a well-defined goal (and is a subset of tasks for uniquifying arrays) and provides the input and expected output. However, this is also where the positives end.

it even attracted 4 answers

Attracting answers is entirely orthogonal to topicality or quality of questions. The only metric that can be reliably determined from observing that a question got N answers in the first hour of its existence is that it is easy, which brings us to the crux of the issue: it should've been closed as a duplicate (as it now is thanks to a gold tag badge holder).

Please do not forget (as you mentioned in comments that you did not look for a duplicate target because you thought the question was too specific) that being a duplicate is determined by answers and not by the question itself. This question (unsurprisingly added to the duplicate target list), for example, has answers that apply 100% to the post in question, so there is nothing specific to it that should've prevented duplicate closure.

9
  • That it had answers was just a hint that others understood the question. About duplicates, I never said there wasn't one, just it didn't seem to me I would easily find one. May 6 at 13:41
  • 1
    That's exactly why I mentioned it, @GiorgiMoniava - that others understood what the question is about is no indication that it is a clear question (however paradoxically it might seem at first glance). However, I do agree with your assessment that the initial closure was, indeed, not correct. May 6 at 14:02
  • 5
    @GiorgiMoniava "just it didn't seem to me I would easily find one" you are right, it's not easy to find one. I found more than a dozen of these and even tried to clean up some. Eventually, I gave up tying to find a canonical because there are just so many questions, each with a few answers. And this is because each time, each of the answerers thought it's going to be too much effort to look for the existing questions. So, now, there are dozens of sources for solutions, not one is the source. With the knowledge so diluted, doesn't seem easy for one to emerge, either.
    – VLAZ
    May 6 at 14:24
  • 1
    yeah but if we just keep answering the same questions over and over, eventually they'll reach a critical mass and automatically merge into a single unique source, right?
    – Kevin B
    May 6 at 14:26
  • @VLAZ You are making me repeat myself. I explained why I didn't bother much to look further for duplicate. At least 6 other people didn't bother too (3 who gave answer, and 3 who incorrectly voted). In the future, I might try bit more. But this meta post is about something else. I hope we are done and I have explained everything. May 6 at 14:47
  • 1
    @GiorgiMoniava I'm not making you do anything. I just explained what the current situation is and how it came by. I've not asked you to repeat what you've said. You already shared you had neither the inclination, nor a reason to uphold the mission of SO. I was trying to show you what this accomplishes. Getting a simple confirmation from the meta post would not have lead to anything useful, without also understating what the correct course of action should have been and why.
    – VLAZ
    May 6 at 14:55
  • @VLAZ I am not sure I understand you, so you mean I disregarded mission of SO? I always close obvious duplicates, this time I didn't think I'd find one. I might have been wrong, but that's it. Our talk started by me stating that my post had negative score, which is not fair, because the post is correct. But yeah if someone had tried harder, duplicate could have been found. That's all there is to it. May 6 at 15:02
  • "that being a duplicate is determined by answers and not by the question itself" no, it's the question. Questions are duplicate even if there's no answers.
    – Braiam
    May 6 at 17:18
  • 3
    @Braiam please, stop trying to revision the policy ad hoc, it's the answers. May 6 at 17:22
-4

I would argue that this was unclear because all the OP does is dump some requirements on us, with no indication of what the actual problem or question was. Even after reading the question several times, I have no idea what the OP is actually confused about.

An MRE would've helped to clarify this question a lot, but there's no evidence the OP tried anything at all. (Yes, I do realize that "no attempt" is not a close reason, but in this case I think that the fact that they didn't show this makes the question unclear).

This fact is reflected in the fact that the answers all write the entire thing for the OP (because that's the only possible answer to this "question").

See also: How much research effort is expected of Stack Overflow users? and especially Why is "Can someone help me?" not an actual question?

17
  • 2
    Are you seriously claiming the linked question is unclear? Imagine for a moment that you were presented with this question (outside of SO), say for an interview, or an exam, would you really need to ask any follow up questions about what the problem statement is asking? Understanding the question doesn't even require any programming knowledge; I would expect any high schooler to understand what the question is asking.
    – cigien
    May 6 at 14:32
  • 7
    @cigien It's completely clear what the OP wants, but it's not clear why the OP is confused. May 6 at 14:51
  • 2
    That's true, but it's not really relevant to SO. If the goal were to help the OP specifically, then yes, it matters what exactly they're confused by, and why they're having difficulty solving the problem. However, the goal of SO is to have a Q&A pair that is useful to any users who want to know how to solve the problem. For that goal, the question is more than clear enough, and wouldn't benefit from the OP's confusion being added to the question. Of course, this particular question is a duplicate, but that doesn't make it unclear at all.
    – cigien
    May 6 at 15:03
  • 1
    @EJoshuaS-StandwithUkraine why does it matter what OP is confused by? They are asking for how something should be done. And "How to" questions are not only accepted on SO, they what the platform was build for. A library of detailed, high-quality answers to every question about programming. How to group and merge values from an array is a question about programming, therefore it fits.
    – VLAZ
    May 6 at 15:03
  • @cigen If I got that as a question in an interview my first thought would be "are you having a laugh?" then politely make my excuses and leave.
    – user692942
    May 6 at 15:12
  • @user692942 Sure, but that sounds like you find the question too simple, which it may well be for an interview question. I'm only pointing out that it's not an unclear question. (Also minor point, if you try to ping someone in a comment, you need to spell the username correctly, or even better, start typing out @ and if it autocompletes the username, just use that.)
    – cigien
    May 6 at 15:22
  • @VLAZ My point was that it's not clear what they're actually asking about that, beyond just "here's my requirement." The only possible answer to this is to write the whole thing for them (which all of the answers do). May 6 at 16:12
  • @cigien As written, it's not really a question at all. The OP doesn't actually ask a question at any point - all they do is state their requirement, with no further indication of what the problem was in implementing that. May 6 at 16:15
  • @EJoshuaS-StandwithUkraine "The only possible answer to this is to write the whole thing for them (which all of the answers do)." that's how to answer "how to" questions.
    – VLAZ
    May 6 at 16:15
  • 2
    @EJoshuaS-StandwithUkraine I don't follow. The OP is asking how to aggregate arrays (it's in the title), and has included input and desired output, which looks very much like a question to me. They don't need to show their difficulty in implementing the solution, unless they want to ask a debugging question.
    – cigien
    May 6 at 17:48
  • @cigien not everyone is open to call OP complete <self-censored> and not being able to perform basic bing.com/search?q=javascript+aggregate+array+of+objects (which gives stackoverflow.com/questions/39885606/… as second link) or being able to understand the suggestions. So it is plausible approach to assume OP did they research but still confused with something - but what exactly they are confused with is unclear. May 6 at 19:24
  • 4
    Whether or not research occurred isn't the reason we request people do the most basic research before asking. The op saying they did some research doesn't answer the concerns those asking for research have. If the most readily available solutions via pasting the title into the search bar didn't work, knowing both that information and why it didn't work are important to the question. Otherwise we're just acting like an inefficient LMGTFY service.
    – Kevin B
    May 6 at 19:55
  • 2
    @GiorgiMoniava That doesn't help unless they show us what that research was. If we knew more about what research they did and why it didn't help, it would be a better starting place for answers. May 6 at 20:34
  • 2
    @VLAZ I thought it was well established that Stack Overflow is not a code-writing service? Are we not still supposed to close questions that can only be answered by writing code that satisfies a specification, such as is the case with homework? May 7 at 0:14
  • 1
    @KarlKnechtel No, it's not a service. However, SO is very much into writing code. We do that in order to answer questions. We've also established that "How to" questions are on-topic. An answer that doesn't supply code but outlines an algorithm is acceptable. As is an answer that supplies code. Unless you're trying to argue that "how to" questions are off-topic, I don't see what your point is.
    – VLAZ
    May 7 at 6:28

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .