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The question Git refusing to merge unrelated histories on rebase has 3000+ upvotes, 32 answers with a lot of votes… and only 1 of its answers, quite low below the other ones, actually takes care of the “on rebase” part of the question¹, and thus really answers it.

To be fair, the question title didn’t initially contain the “on rebase”, it was only mentioned in the body. The issue is probably more frequent with merge/pull, hence it attracts a lot of people with the exact same error in those situations.

Also note that, as opposed to the situation mentioned in How to resolve incoherence between question and answer, OP didn’t accept any answer, and even pointed repeatedly in the comments that his situation is a rebase and not a merge/pull.

It thus seems that the current situation is unsalvageable if we want to keep the original meaning of the question. On the other hand, the same question has also been asked and answered properly, so theoretically one should be a duplicate of the other… but that wouldn’t make much sense.

What should we do about it?

I would propose this, but I don’t know if it is acceptable:

  1. rephrase the question to match its answers (i.e. remove the “on rebase” part)
  2. add a note in the question about its history, and a link to the question properly describing the original problem
  3. have a mod move the 1 or 2 answers that actually mention the rebase from the former to the latter – not possible

¹ ok, this one as well but it does not really answer the question

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    I would encourage readers to think very carefully about unilaterally editing a Q&A that has been viewed 2.2 million times and literally helped tens to hundreds of thousands of people. Just because an answer doesn't fully answer the question at the top of the page doesn't mean it's not helpful. Apr 28 at 20:41
  • 6
    "have a mod move the 1 or 2 answers that actually mention the rebase from the former to the latter" - this is not a thing we can do. Apr 28 at 21:31
  • @IanCampbell the answers on this question are clearly very helpful… to people who aren’t actually looking for an answer to this question. It’s not that one answer does not fully answer the question, it’s that all answers (except one) do not help at all when you are in the situation described by the question. And the one that really helps is hidden under the pile of highly upvoted answers. I don’t want to unilaterally change anything (hence this question), but I would like to fix this mess…
    – Didier L
    Apr 28 at 23:23
  • @IanCampbell oh yeah, hadn't thought people would do that in this particular case. I thought your comment had something to do with the down votes but it seems not then.
    – Didier L
    Apr 28 at 23:35

1 Answer 1

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Option 4: upvote good answers, downvote anything that is wrong. Use your reasoning skills for anything that falls in between.

And that is all you can do, there is no "we" involved here. Just business as usual. Normally you could also add a comment to grab people's attention to a lower scored but very valuable answer, but that has already been done so no need.

There isn't really a "problem" here to be honest, besides the fact that the question is older and very popular and thus inevitably turned into a mess of answers and high upvote counts because the human condition made it so. The information is there, you just need to do a little effort to find it. I frequently find my solutions in late answers with a score of -1 to at most 2, that tends to be the case for nasty production software issues where happy flows are only a dream. People who need such answers know not to do selective reading.

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  • upvote good answers, downvote anything that is wrong > this is completely useless. The only right answer has 45 votes. There are 11 answers with more votes. The highest voted answer has a score of 3459, it gets new votes almost every day, and the second highest as well. And I would like to avoid serial-downvoting 10+ answers. So basically all of this is “let it rot”. Also, this implies that the other question should be closed as a duplicate, right?
    – Didier L
    Apr 29 at 18:40

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