2

The game Wordle is in vogue right now, and we got . There also exists , and . Are these really necessary? We don't have , . These game and puzzle tags read to me as metatags. They don't add anything of value to the question. is a bit of a grey area to me.

Should we remove , , and ?

3 Answers 3

25

Burnination is not appropriate because none of them fail the four required tests. In fact, each only fails the second test:

1. Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?

Yes. Such questions can be assumed to be implementing algorithms mostly unique to those types of games.

2. Is the concept described even on-topic for the site?

No. On their own their subjects have nothing to do with programming.

3. Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?

Yes. It may be useful to understand the type of game the programmer is attempting to write when solving a problem related to it.

4. Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts?

Yes. Each tag is colloquially understood as the name of each game. could be made to be ambiguous with string searching but there are already more appropriate tags for the latter.


Similar declined requests

4
  • I would argue that Wordle, crossword, etc. are all 'word search' type games; you are trying to guess the word.
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 14:45
  • wordle-game probably could be merged into wordsearch since it's really the name of a game, I'll give you that. But the others are all types of games and while searching for words is their common feature, there are enough nuances with implementation of each game type that I feel there is some value in differentiating. Perhaps a rename would be in order to instead append the -game suffix to the end of each type of game. And let's not forget that we kept flappy-bird-clone which had the same vein of argument against it.
    – Bender
    Apr 19 at 14:50
  • 2
    @TylerH but being specific is not a burnination criteria. I'm not even sure you could argue that that it is overly-specific given the prevalence of Wordle clones and the utility of being able to discriminate such questions from other word game questions. Apr 19 at 14:50
  • 1
    @StephenOstermiller I am not disagreeing with Bender's overall post/argument (in fact I agree with it), just one point under section #4.
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 14:54
4

I would think there is some value in the kind of game you want to implement. A lot of game programmers start out with "more basic" games like Sudoku or Tetris or Crossword puzzles (e.g. in PyGame or elsewhere) and it can be useful to filter on questions about the kind of game you are trying to create since the shared rule-set means you will usually implement your game code the same way.

That being said, I think there is a distinction to be made between some of the tags you have mentioned. Sudoku for example is a type of game, whereas Wordle is a specific game in a type of game (word guessing/word searching). I don't think we need specific game tags (e.g. , etc.) at all.

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  • 2
    We should have an Doom tag, also elden ring, mario, celeste, metroid, etc.
    – Braiam
    Apr 19 at 14:39
  • 1
    @Braiam So you disagree with my answer?
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 14:40
  • I think Braiam was being sarcastic, but didn't read the second paragraph where you suggest that tags for specific games shouldn't exist. Apr 19 at 14:51
  • 1
    Yeah, I was being sarcastic. Having tags for "games" or "complete product for users" is basically setting ourself to failure. None of those tags are topics in the programming context, aka off topic tags.
    – Braiam
    Apr 19 at 15:25
  • 4
    @Braiam That take seems to preclude any question on any topic unless it's not only about programming, but programming for something that is also used by programmers/for programming, e.g. writing your own IDE.
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 16:07
  • No, it doesn't. It just reject the idea that you should create a tag for it.
    – Braiam
    Apr 19 at 18:54
  • 2
    @Braiam Then you reject the tag system, by and large, because that's the tag system is for: classifying questions based on their subject matter.
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 18:56
  • 1
    No, it's to "describes the topic of the question". The topic of the question isn't "making a game", not even "making a specific game", it is "a practical problem unique to software development". Those topics do not belong here, but on Arqade
    – Braiam
    Apr 19 at 19:01
  • 5
    @Braiam The question title, not its tags, is for describing the topic of the question. Tags are a classification system. Arqade, by the way, is for questions about playing games, not programming them. Questions about programming, whether programming a game or anything else, belong on Stack Overflow. Some programming questions can be asked on GameDev.SE as well, but they are not off-topic on Stack Overflow just because the thing being programmed is a game.
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 19:26
-6

Should we remove wordle-game, wordsearch, sudoku and crossword?

Yes, we should. And not because they succeed/fail the burnination criteria, but because they fail the meta tag criteria. You are speaking about the overall goal of the code you are writing, not about the specific technologies that you are using within the programming context. I could have the world record on Wordle or play Sudoku professionally in championships, but I would be unable to answer the question asked if I do not know anything the domain software development context of the question, like I wouldn't know how to answer Java questions either. Yes, knowing how those games work can help, but that's on the asker to explain what the supposed code should achieve, not the tags.

I've created calculators, plugins, web apps, etc. and people knowing what is the final product of all the code I'm writing rarely helped. I would say that it would be useful for code review (code is supposed to do X, review that it does efficiently), but for that reason we aren't in the code review business anymore.

11
  • 2
    The tag burnination criteria cover all tags; there is no separate criteria/process for 'meta tags'.
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 16:07
  • 4
    By your reasoning, the active-directory tag wouldn't belong. However, I am well versed in both powershell and active-directory, and as such I can filter on them to find users having problems writing automation integrating with AD. And as an experienced user of AD I can offer more targeted solutions or even spot problems with their implementation where a general PowerShell expert might not have the same AD experience and miss these subtle cues. Or maybe someone wants to avoid AD questions because that isn't their area of expertise. The tag is useful for negation filters, too.
    – Bender
    Apr 19 at 16:53
  • 2
    Additionally, meta tags aren't against the rules. They are recommended against by some, but ultimately if a tag is taxonomically useful and isn't causing problems, then there's no reason it needs to be burninated.
    – Bender
    Apr 19 at 17:01
  • @BendertheGreatest you do not compile against active directory, you compile against the ldap library/api. This question is off topic, this is on topic. So, you are being particularly misleading, or creating a strawman for yourself
    – Braiam
    Apr 19 at 18:58
  • @BendertheGreatest "meta tags aren't against the rules" [citation needed urgently]. Meta tags are prohibited by definition "A tag is a word or phrase that describes the topic of the question". That post of Cody is misleading. A meta tag will always hurt when it becomes too big or crowds out other more relevant tags, which I haven't seen a meta tag not do.
    – Braiam
    Apr 19 at 19:00
  • @TylerH of course there isn't one, because they shouldn't exist by definition. It shouldn't be created at all.
    – Braiam
    Apr 19 at 19:02
  • 8
    It sounds to me that in your view, every question should have exactly one tag for the programming language. Any aspects of the question that are tangential to programming or are unrelated to programming shouldn't have tags? Apr 19 at 19:08
  • 3
    @Braiam So if you acknowledge a separate process does not exist for meta tag burnination, then why does your answer argue that we should apply said imaginary process to the tags under discussion, rather than the real/extant process?
    – TylerH
    Apr 19 at 19:24
  • @StephenOstermiller Not that are on topic no.
    – Braiam
    May 4 at 14:44
  • @TylerH because process should have an objective. Not merely exist for the sake of it.
    – Braiam
    May 4 at 14:45
  • @Braiam It sounds like your issue is with the burnination process, not with this thread.
    – TylerH
    May 4 at 17:11

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