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I stumbled across this question: What is a Python egg?

Now, I understand that it is 12 years old, maybe at that time it wasn't as easy to find information, but we are talking 2010, not 1999, so I still think this is a valid example. Please beware that I mean what should be done for a question like this at the time of its publication. This is just an example, and probably, not a very good one as it was stated in the comment section.

The answer to this question must have been available on the internet, in the form of documentation, tutorials, courses etc. etc. at that time.

It is a simple question which is good to have in a knowledge repo-type of web, as that type of FAQ for newbies in Python, and maybe it is a good question because, again, maybe someone in SO can explain it in a really good way for future readers to understand it easier. But on the other side, it just doesn't meet what I would expect from a good question in SO. It looks like a lazy approach to just ask here. Shouldn't people be asking here as a last resort method?

What is the correct approach when stumbling this kind of questions?

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    I'm curious, why does it matter whether the question is "lazy"?
    – cigien
    Apr 11 at 15:54
  • I have seen so many times people saying a question should show some research before being asked. I assume it is a basic part of SO's code of conduct.
    – S. Dre
    Apr 11 at 15:56
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    @S.Dre What makes you think that research was as easy 12 years ago is it is now? You do touch on this in your question, but 2010 was massively different to now. Apr 11 at 15:57
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    A question like this is likely to receive downvotes now days, but that doesn't mean they won't receive enough upvotes to survive if the question is one people frequently enough have to bring in traffic.
    – Kevin B
    Apr 11 at 15:57
  • @NickstandswithUkraine It is an example, what if I stumble a new question like that? And again, it was 2010, the internet was already in a somewhat mature state... example1 example2
    – S. Dre
    Apr 11 at 15:57
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    For a mature technology, a "lazy" question asked nowadays has most likely been asked before, so find the best duplicate and flag it. Apr 11 at 15:59
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    No, it's definitely not a part of the CoC. Also, while users should put in effort to see if their question has been asked, this effort doesn't need to be visible in question itself, as that tends to just be noise. (Note that this particular question might be unclear, etc, but the fact that any research put in by the user is not visible in the question is irrelevant).
    – cigien
    Apr 11 at 16:00
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    Put another way... beginner questions are often popular because they are beginner questions, not because they were poorly researched or for any other reason related to the way it was asked. If a language is currently having a high influx of new users it's more likely for such questions to gain traction, particularly when that language doesn't already have a large footprint here on SO.
    – Kevin B
    Apr 11 at 16:02
  • Thanks, @snakecharmerb, I guess if it is the first time to be asked here, or the by far best question about it, it still is useful for the site.
    – S. Dre
    Apr 11 at 16:03
  • @KevinB , that makes sense.
    – S. Dre
    Apr 11 at 16:04
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    @cigien: I wouldn't say it's irrelevant, given that the downvote tooltip is "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful." That certainly suggests to me that questions are expected to show research effort, and that it's reasonable for readers to consider that relevant to their voting.
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 11 at 16:04
  • @JonSkeet For up/down voting, sure, you could use that as a metric if you want. Honestly, any up/down voting is fine, so long as it's not targeted at a user. I meant it's not relevant for close-votes, which is what some users do for questions that don't show research effort. Perhaps I should have been clearer in my comment.
    – cigien
    Apr 11 at 16:34
  • I recommend to go looking for a different example. This question isn't simple or lazy, and a similar question today would not be simple nor lazy either. That's a really dark pit the asker descended into... Apr 11 at 16:34
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  • They are no longer called "eggs", but "wheels"... (as noted in the updated answer) Apr 12 at 19:25

2 Answers 2

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There's really nothing to do.

This is the kind of question that is perfect for its time, and perfect for the site in its current state. As in, we want to preserve a question like this. This helps others and gets them information that they need as an answer to a specific question. There's nothing off-topic about it, even if in your assessment you consider it "lazy".

I mean today if you tried to ask this kind of question you'd be met with a lot of fervor and downvotes, but I don't see a reason to give this question any more vitriol or dirty looks.

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  • Yes, I meant for a new question we find like this one. This is obviously 12 years old and given it's 'encyclopedic' nature I wouldn't suggest to touch it neither. But if we were back then and thought it was lazy, or if nowadays we find something like this.
    – S. Dre
    Apr 11 at 16:10
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    I'm quite reluctant to use older questions as a basis on what we should do for newer questions, @S.Dre. I'm of the impression that not a lot of painstaking thought needs to be given to a question like this if it was asked today - mostly, if there's a dupe, find the dupe.
    – Makoto
    Apr 11 at 16:12
  • Maybe you are right @Makoto, and this wasn't a good example to begin with.
    – S. Dre
    Apr 11 at 16:13
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The question seems to be on-topic. It is one of the questions that we are looking for.

It isn't lazy. Even in the original form, it wasn't lazy. Maybe this information is freely available in the documentation, but at the time of asking it wasn't available on Stack Overflow. Stack Overflow is not a documentation of the language; it is much more. We can provide examples and a better explanation of the topic being asked for.

A lazy question is one that the asker didn't bother checking if it has been asked before on Stack Overflow. A lazy question has often grammatical issues, typos and generally looks like it was written in a hurry. Lazy questions lack a proper title that would make the question easily searchable. If it isn't an outright duplicate, then it probably has other quality issues that qualify it for one of the available close reasons. That, however, was not the case with the question you gave as an example.

Simple questions are good if they are well-written and haven't been asked before.

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