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I've looked for existing questions along this line, but the only one I've found is this Stack Exchange Meta post, which seems to be asking a similar question, but is from a decade ago, so I don't know that anything it says is relevant here, or anymore.

Context:

Shortly before 1 AM GMT (midnight UTC), I was sitting at 979 reputation.[1] I went away, read/slept, whatever. At 10 am GMT, 9 hours later, I went to check my notifications on Stack Overflow, and saw something about a vote reversal. It seems someone upvoted a bunch of my answers during the night—so that I reached ~1,150, the algorithm caught it, and the reputation has been subsequently removed.

All of this is fine; I understand the purpose of the algorithm for checking this, and why the reputation is removed.

Question:

What I don't get, is why it is displayed as an actual loss of reputation in my reputation graph:

A reputation line graph showing a flat line for the period before I became active, then a steadily-increasing peak with a sharper rise and then fall at the end—these last being the serial voting and reversal.

A bar graph version of the reputation graph, showing several green columns of varying heights over 12 days (the last of which is much taller due to serial voting and a bounty), and then one red column for today.

(Yes, my reputation for 9 April exceeds the maximum—I got a bounty.)

I don't know if this is what also happens with reputation 'lost' from posts that are removed because when this has happened to me it's been overshadowed by my daily gains. That is a different discussion, though.

My question has three parts:

  1. The serial voting and subsequent reversal are not a reflection of anything I did, so why should that gain and subsequent loss appear in my reputation graph at all?

  2. If this is still the same issue as in the Stack Exchange Meta post from 10 years ago—that the serial voting gains and reversal aren't applied on the same day—why hasn't this been fixed?

  3. Why wouldn't these have been applied on the same day? From different badge requirements I gather that Stack Overflow operates on UTC time, and it seems unlikely that all of the serial voting in this case was accomplished in the short time between when I left my computer and midnight UTC.

In the grand scheme of things, it doesn't matter, but now these graphs look like I went off the rails today. You also can't hide reputation losses due to vote reversals. And both graphs, exactly as shown above, are visible to me when I am not logged in to my account, so they are also visible to anyone else.

[1]: I know this because I have been making a concerted effort to build my reputation here, recently.

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  • 8
    "now these graphs look like I went off the rails today." How, exactly? Reputation fluctuates over time; that's completely normal. I am not understanding how you expect a dip in reputation caused by a voting correction not to appear in a time-series graph of reputation.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 10 at 11:04
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    Because I would expect that if the gains themselves were deemed not legitimate, that they wouldn't appear in the graph. A graph like these only conveys meaningful information if all of the information shown is equally valid. If the displayed gains and losses can be either legitimately earned or the result of serial upvoting/subsequent reversal—and the two aren't differentiated in some way—the graph doesn't indicate anything useful, so what's the point? Apr 10 at 11:11
  • 2
    I'm wondering if you see that same dip in 48 hours, assuming you got a reputation event in that time period. The reasoning here is that the Graph is cached but didn't had a chance to catch-up yet with the removed vote records from the votes table
    – rene
    Apr 10 at 11:12
  • @rene, I don't know! I'll have to keep an eye on it. If it is purely down to the cache, then that seems fine. But I wonder how the gain and loss showing on different days will affect that. Apr 10 at 14:12
  • IIRC vote invalidation is done by deleting the actual rows from the votes table. If the reputation graph depicting rep-gain / loss is based on the rows in the votes table, it should iron out over time. But we'll see if that holds.
    – rene
    Apr 10 at 14:18
  • If I notice it change/disappear due to something like cache updating, I will definitely update/answer/remove the question as seems appropriate. Apr 10 at 14:20
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    It looks so pronounced in your graph because the graph only covers a short period of time. Over time, it will become less pronounced progressively down to a relatively minor blip, and, eventually, not be something that's displayed, as the time-period of what's displayed in that graph moves beyond today. That process may take a significant amount of time, potentially years. It is, unfortunately, what we have to live with when someone chooses to serially upvote or downvote us. I'm not saying that's a good thing, that it shouldn't be different, or that we don't sympathize with the frustration.
    – Makyen Mod
    Apr 10 at 16:14
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    Unfortunately, it's the way the system works. Other than trying to bring it to the attention of SE staff, and maybe they allocate developer time to change how this works, there's not much any of us can do. The upvote events all happened within a short period of time within yesterday's UTC day. The automatic reversal happened at its normal 03:00UTC. In the future, one thing that SE might be able to do is move when that script runs to, say, 23:45UTC, making the auto-reversals be mostly in the same UTC day, but that would require change on their part and is subject to system loading issues.
    – Makyen Mod
    Apr 10 at 16:14
  • However, in your case, it's currently possible for you to mitigate what's displayed, with substantial effort on your part. The way you could do that is to legitimately earn a substantial amount of reputation within this UTC day. Any amount you earn today will result in lessening the discontinuity in that graph. While it would be a lot of work, it is an amount of reputation which is possible to fully regain today, even just through upvotes. (Note: you can look at your reputation page to see when the upvotes happened.)
    – Makyen Mod
    Apr 10 at 16:14
  • @Makyen, that 03.00 UTC piece of information is interesting. That at least explains how it got clocked as a different day, though I still think it's weird for that to be applied in a way that's out-of-sync with what gets displayed. I get my relatively short period of activity here and that the serial up-voting represented a significant proportion of my total rep make this look so pronounced—and that that will not be the case with time. It just feels like one of those cases where several decisions taken for good reasons interact and produce side effects that are on the negative side of neutral. Apr 10 at 16:38
  • @baileythegreen I agree, unfortunately, there's really nothing we can do about it, other than try to bring to the attention of SE staff the fact that it is experienced as negative by the users on the receiving end. As I've mentioned, for your specific situation, given that it happened between yesterday and today (UTC) and that the amount of reputation is below what's reasonably possible to earn in a single day, it's possible for you to expend considerable effort to try to mitigate the effect on yourself. If you want to do that is up to you. I wish I had better options to offer, but I don't.
    – Makyen Mod
    Apr 10 at 17:17
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    "but now these graphs look like I went off the rails today" - You're still too human. Give it time, eventually you'll start to read the stats like a machine.
    – Gimby
    Apr 11 at 12:10
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    In this case, given that you've already identified a feature-request on Meta Stack Exchange (MSE) which addresses the issue, you could write an answer there describing your personal experience and how it feels negative/demotivating/unwelcoming to you. I'd keep the tone away from being accusatory towards SE or individuals and primarily describing how it felt to you. Alternately, placing a bounty on that question would also be a way to draw attention to it.
    – Makyen Mod
    Apr 11 at 15:46
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    I'm unsure if there's already a duplicate here on Meta Stack Overflow (MSO) (I haven't searched). If there's not already such a question here on MSO, you could create a new feature request here on MSO. In addition to the technically much harder full solution of having reversals be applied on the same day on which each vote happened, I'd be sure to mention the potential mitigation for the auto-reversal script of moving its run time to the very end of the UTC day, rather than near the beginning of the next day, as I don't recall that limited mitigation being previously mentioned/explored.
    – Makyen Mod
    Apr 11 at 15:46
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    "now these graphs look like I went off the rails today" - Actually at first glance, I'd just assume you offered a bounty on that day. Posting a bounty also registers as a reputation loss, so I doubt regular SO users attach much/any stigma to reputation dips. I also doubt non-SO users even pay attention to the graph. However, I do agree in principle that serial voting/reversal should just be wiped out (or applied same day).
    – tdy
    Apr 12 at 8:16

1 Answer 1

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  1. The serial voting and subsequent reversal are not a reflection of anything I did, so why should that gain and subsequent loss appear in my reputation graph at all?

They may not be your actions, but they were applied to posts you own, so they affected your reputation. Thus, your reputation balance increased and decreased. Why wouldn't this be shown on your page? If you were expecting it to show neither an increase or decrease, then you are thinking of what is called a "reputation recalculation". This is separate from a reputation/voting reversal (which just counteracts the vote action after the initial action has been stored permanently in the database); recalculations are very expensive and are only done for rare events (like when question upvotes changed from being worth 5 reputation to 10 reputation)... a recalculation would make it as if the change never happened.

  1. If this is still the same issue as in the Stack Exchange Meta post from 10 years ago—that the serial voting gains and reversal aren't applied on the same day—why hasn't this been fixed?

I haven't read the post you reference, but this is is the same as your 3rd question, which I will answer below:

  1. Why wouldn't these have been applied on the same day? From different badge requirements I gather that Stack Overflow operates on UTC time, and it seems unlikely that all of the serial voting in this case was accomplished in the short time between when I left my computer and midnight UTC.

The voting occurred on 9 April, so it is recorded for that day. The reversal script runs at 1AM UTC and so it did not catch and reverse the votes until that time, which was then 10 April. That is why they are shown as happening on different days. Even if the script ran at midnight, that is 00:00 UTC, or 10 April... AKA a new day. It is 9 April until 23:59:59.999.... then it becomes 10 April, 00:00:00.000 (there is no concept of 24:00:00.000).

In the grand scheme of things, it doesn't matter, but now these graphs look like I went off the rails today. You also can't hide reputation losses due to vote reversals. And both graphs, exactly as shown above, are visible to me when I am not logged in to my account, so they are also visible to anyone else.

You are right, this does not matter. Your reputation decreases when you downvote an answer or give a bounty, or when someone downvotes a post of yours, and sometimes when a post of yours is deleted (depending on its age and score). These are not bad or demeaning events... just like I expect you are not ashamed when your bank account balance decreases by several dollars when you purchase a cup of coffee at a cafe. Your bank account balance is just a ledger of transactions, like your rep history. If you continue contributing to the site in earnest, your reputation will still grow over time and even a 50-point drop of reputation at once will look like an insignificant blip after a few years.

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