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I have a boiler plate comment I use to help prompt new users to provide more detail to spartan posts. Particularly posts where they show no attempt or post images of code. I use it as I try to be welcoming while still encouraging good questions. It is something like:

Hi and welcome to SO. It is important for the community that you also demonstrate that you are working to solve your issue. The best way to do that in my opinion is to include the text based version of the source code you have so far, even if it is not working quite right.

It appears as though someone recently mass deleted these comments. I can see where some lingering examples remain such as this comment where I added a bit to the end and presumably bypassed the mass delete.

How do I flatten multiple 2d arrays inside a 3d array?

This comment like many is well upvoted so I am surprised to find them subjected to a mass delete. As an example of one that I know (strongly suspect) was deleted you can see here:

Any simple way to get a list of data with certain elements and not counting the 0?

I am almost certain that I posted a comment similar to the one I use here.

Are these comments being systematically deleted and, if so, why? They typically generate upvotes and thus seem well received. If they are being deleted as not appropriate, then am I verging on being punished for something I should not be doing?

If these comments are not being deleted and I am just falsely remembering having used them in the past little while, please excuse this.

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    Boilerplate comments are routinely flagged and deleted, which I think it's perfectly reasonable. It's better to give specific, custom feedback on a post; or if not use standard system features (voting, flagging, etc.) as feedback tools.
    – yivi
    Apr 4 at 18:45
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    Given the question has "text-based" code present, the comment is clearly no longer needed.
    – Kevin B
    Apr 4 at 18:46
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    Instead of “text based version of the source code”, consider “[mre]” which will expand to minimal reproducible example. Apr 4 at 18:47
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    Aside from that... i find it... counter-productive to hide "Please add code to your question" within a paragraph of "Welcome to SO!". Just get to the point.
    – Kevin B
    Apr 4 at 18:49
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    @KevinB As the user in question is almost always flagged a "new user" and I am told by the system to "be nice". It seemed perfectly reasonable to start with a welcome statement. Five words of welcome did not seem verbose or distracting to me.
    – JonSG
    Apr 4 at 18:53
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    If the feedback on a comment has been acted upon, it's even more likely the comments would be flagged and deleted. Comments are deleted all the time. If you are not getting mod messages about being rude/unkind, nothing to worry about.
    – yivi
    Apr 4 at 18:53
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    Not being welcoming, and helpful, is why so many young developers new to the system find it combative, and unrewarding.
    – Andy
    Apr 4 at 19:00
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    Here's my boilerplate for new users who may not understand how the site works that includes links to the help section. "Welcome to SO. You might find reading the site help section useful when it comes to asking a good question, and this question checklist. Code that you have worked on to solve the problem should include a [mcve], and be included in your question." It never gets removed.
    – Andy
    Apr 4 at 19:02
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    i mean... i guarantee we could get one of them removed, there's nothing special about your comment vs jon's that would keep it around when it isn't needed anymore.
    – Kevin B
    Apr 4 at 19:02
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    See, this is exactly the attitude I'm talking about.
    – Andy
    Apr 4 at 19:03
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    Boilerplate like those aren't really that helpful. Those comments simply repeat what's already shown around on the site. If one wants to help, one should post custom comments specifically addressing a post, not simply copy past generic advice.
    – yivi
    Apr 4 at 19:09
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    Useful comments contain actionable requests. If the comment more or less just repeats what the close reason is... it's not doing anything that the system isn't already doing, assuming a close vote is actually being cast. If the system messages aren't "welcoming" enough, that can be fixed.
    – Kevin B
    Apr 4 at 19:17
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    @KevinB My comment contains an actionable request. One to show an attempt via text based code. I am actually not voting to close typically when I post this comment as I am hoping to get the user to edit and improve their question so it does not need to be closed. Is the comment about leaving 10 fruitless comments this month for me?
    – JonSG
    Apr 4 at 19:21
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    Boilerplate comments do not work either. They just add noise. Asking users for specific details about their post and their issue in particular and mention that they shouldn't be posting text as images would be much more useful.
    – yivi
    Apr 4 at 19:21
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3 Answers 3

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Comments are by design temporary and you can expect them to be deleted at some point.

These comments were mass deleted by moderators, because they were no longer needed. In fact, one might argue that they were probably never needed. And here is why:

Hi and welcome to SO. It is important for the community that you also demonstrate that you are working to solve your issue.

It is not. The only things that are important are that the question is on-topic and can be answered. We are not interested to know whether the asker knows what the solution already is, they are actively working to get that solution, or doesn't care about the solution at all. As long as the question is a good addition to our knowledge base, it's the only thing that counts.

The best way to do that in my opinion is to include the text based version of the source code you have so far, even if it is not working quite right.

The code often helps to understand the question, but in many situations it can be only noise. The attempt might be so far off that it's not going to help you answer it. But, if the question lacks clarity, be it code sample or otherwise, feel free to vote to close. You don't have to post a comment as the closure should already convey the same information. Comments should be used to ask for very specific clarifications, not "what have you tried". If you need to know something more about OP's tries, add a tailored comment to that specific question.

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    Don't we routinely ask for users to demonstrate some effort at solving their question? That seems to be what the post stackoverflow.com/help/minimal-reproducible-example is all about. I guess my motivation has been "Let's see if we can get this crappy question into a state where someone can legit answer it" as that seemed to be the productive "nice" thing to do.
    – JonSG
    Apr 4 at 20:48
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    @JonSG True, but that applies to questions such as "Why my code doesn't run properly?" or "I got this error message, how to fix it?". Questions such as this must have code to be answerable. Questions like "how to do XYZ" don't need code.
    – Dharman Mod
    Apr 4 at 20:56
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While Dharman's answer is spot-on, I want to address the obvious apprehension towards voting that you surface:

My comment contains an actionable request. One to show an attempt via text based code. I am actually not voting to close typically when I post this comment as I am hoping to get the user to edit and improve their question so it does not need to be closed. Is the comment about leaving 10 fruitless comments this month for me?

Irrespective of if you disagree with downvotes or close votes on a post, they send a consistent message. A message that says, consistently, that this post is in need of improvement.

If you add a comment, you send an inconsistent message. One that may be riddled with assumptions or other shortcomings in it that further dilute the point of why you're bothering to comment in the first place.

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    That's fair. I'll own an apprehension to close vote a new user. As I said, my hope was to encourage them to improve their question so that they could get help rather than a potentially disappointing experience. I guess I'll just vote to close from this point forward as I agree that is more consistent with how many feel this site operates. I appreciate your feedback.
    – JonSG
    Apr 4 at 21:12
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    @JonSG: It is not your job to encourage them to improve their question. Your role in this is to moderate the question in the moment. If their question is poorly formed, you must expressly say so. It's not like you take the time with every working-age adult in your life to explain to them how to ask you a question while they're trying to ask you the question, so there's no reason to extend that courtesy to an online community.
    – Makoto
    Apr 4 at 21:32
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If you feel that a question lacks information, please vote to close or provide a specific comment about what details the OP must add to the question (ideally after editing the question so it looks like a good candidate to stay on the site).

There is really not much value in semi-identical canned comments instantly posted on the question like:

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  • Thanks for the answer. None of those comments are mine, though your point is well taken. I would like to think I would not "pile on" like that but I certainly might have in the past. As @Makato has pointed out to me the more consistent thing for everyone is just to vote to close.
    – JonSG
    Apr 4 at 21:15

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