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Overview

As we know Stack Overflow has a closure process which users begin participating in at 15 reputation with flagging privileges and then later with full closure votes at 3000 reputation

Recently, I've been thinking a lot about our closure reasons/guidance, and if they actually do what they set out to do.

What initially started me thinking about our closure reason's was Cody Gray's answer to Make description of “community-specific reason” close reason more clear in which a complete revamp of closure reasons was proposed.

Discovery

Over the past several months, I've continued to think about how we use our closure reasons, and where we can potentially have room for improvement.

I've also found more than a few related discussions, so it's clear that there are changes that the community is interested in making, but very few are making it to :

In my exploration, I've learned that we really don't have much ability to affect change on the universal/network-wide closure reasons:

  1. Duplicate
  2. Needs detail or clarity
  3. Needs more focus
  4. Opinion-based
  5. A community-specific reason
    • This question belongs on another site in the Stack Exchange network
    • Other - add a comment

If my understanding is correct, changing these reasons would have widespread effects throughout the network and also require dev time to complete.

However, I've also learned that we do have several reasons that are modifiable with CM controls. These are likely things that we would be able to change if we could come together with a consensus of how we want these to be.

Our 5 Community-Specific Closure Reasons:

Something I had vaguely been aware of, but had not fully conceptualised is that there are 5 configurable fields:

  1. Brief description
  2. Usage guidance
  3. Post notice close description
  4. Post owner guidance
  5. Privileged user guidance

The current close descriptions read as follows:

  1. About general computing hardware and software
  2. About professional server- or networking-related infrastructure administration
  3. Not reproducible or was caused by a typo
  4. Needs debugging details
  5. Seeking recommendations for books, tools, software libraries, and more

The full details for our current reasons are accessible via SEDE query

Process

Per Catija's sample process on MSE I'd like to eventually be able to

workshop the five fields for each (probably one meta discussion for each close reason)

But first I'd like to propose we start with a community review of our existing community-specific closure reasons, and consider which reasons we'd like to keep and those we'd like to retire.

Once we've established which reasons we are keeping, retiring, or adding we can then move on to workshopping each reason to nail down how we'd like the description and guidance to read. Then ultimately have the changes applied and improve the process for everyone involved.

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  • 9
    I still don't understand the benefit of "Seeking recommendations for books, tools, software libraries, and more" - It's just Opinion-Based but more specific Apr 1 at 6:37
  • 13
    @NickstandswithUkraine that reason evolved from recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource that at least mentioned off-site resource so you could distinguish between one opinion vs the other. From there on only more welcoming variants emerged.
    – rene
    Apr 1 at 6:45
  • 2
    @rene Yes, I can remember the old reason, and while the specificity it provided then made it more more clear than it is now, I'm not convinced it was distinct enough to be it's own close reason. Apr 1 at 6:50
  • 2
    My thoughts are articulated here on this: the closure system is outdated.
    – Travis J
    Apr 7 at 22:01
  • 6
    Try providing a way for the person asking to question to request clarification on why their question has been closed. Unfortunately downvotes are a great tool for bully's as they are anonymous but closing a question should be very transparent.
    – dannyhut
    Apr 21 at 1:43
  • 6
    Closure is already transparent, @dannyhut. Users closing are publicly visible, as well as the reason for closure. If one needs clarifications, there is a proper way to do so - posting a question on Meta tagged specific-question. Apr 21 at 1:53
  • 2
    @Oleg Valter is with Ukraine Thanks for the info can you tell me how to find out the User who closed the Question and where I find why my question has been closed. I can find no answer to these question with the closure notice.
    – dannyhut
    Apr 21 at 2:17
  • 5
    @dannyhut If you have a question about why one of your own questions was closed you can ask a separate question here on Meta to get feedback about your specific situation. This post is about updating or modifying Stack Overflow’s existing site-specific closure reasons and not about how the current reasons are used or about why any specific question was closed. Apr 21 at 2:25
  • 1
    @Henry Ecker. My comment was in response to Oleg's comment. I am asking Oleg for clarification in response to his comment. I was not asking a question about any question I have asked, though I do see how you could assume I had.
    – dannyhut
    Apr 21 at 2:30
  • 1
    All the information is in the post close notice at the top of the post. In your case it is "This question needs to be more focused" with a link to what closure, including "too broad" means. You can also inspect the guidance we just published as part of this project for more details. Users who voted to close should be visible in the notice as well. IIRC the company changed that for users who don't have the close vote privilege, but they should still be visible in the post timeline. Apr 21 at 2:38
  • 4
    The individuals who closed the post are never visible in the post notice if you’re the post owner @OlegValteriswithUkraine though they are, of course, listed in the timeline for everyone (even users without an account). Apr 21 at 2:40
  • 1
    I always wonder what the difference between "detail" and "focus" is. Aren't these two at least related? Adding detail to a broad question typically narrows it down, doesn't it? Apr 25 at 9:35
  • 2
    There still exists a need to be able to change the close reason either becuase a different reason comes through an edit, or because of a mistake. It's very unforgiving. Apr 29 at 10:47
  • 1
    @sgfit Spam, (too much) Trolling, Harassment are.
    – cachius
    May 13 at 7:54
  • 1
    @sgfit Yes, there are. May 13 at 11:54

10 Answers 10

132

Close reasons which I'm missing, that do not currently exist:

  • The question is not written in English.

    This is very common.

  • Not a question but a copy/paste of a homework assignment.

    Extremely common and very rude. Should optionally lead to disciplinary actions against the poster.

  • The question must demonstrate a minimum of knowledge/research about the topic being discussed.

    We had this one until 2014 somewhere, when the site was still for professional and enthusiast programmers. A programmer being someone who has at least basic knowledge of the programming language in question. Which can be specifically defined as: having read the first chapters of a beginner-level book on the topic.

    Contrary to popular belief, SO is not an interactive beginner tutorial. It is not a replacement for conventional studies. The purpose of the site is not to give answers which can easily be found in the first chapter of a beginner-level book. Or through a brief search with an Internet search engine ("let me Google that for you").

    And before someone makes an argument that the "unclear" close reason should be used: no, the question isn't unclear at all. We simply expect the OP to put a minimum of effort into answering the question themselves before posting here. Questions completely lacking research cannot get edited into shape by providing a clarification.

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  • 48
    Big upvote from me for demonstrate minimum of knowledge/research!
    – jay.sf
    Apr 21 at 15:02
  • 72
    "The purpose of the site is not to give answers which can easily be found in the first chapter of a beginner-level book. Or through a brief search with an Internet search engine ("let me Google that for you")." This is wrong. See the tour, wherein it is noted that our goal is to build a library of high-quality answers to every question about programming. There is no requirement that a question not be too basic. That is not, and has never been, a close reason. "You are conflating three different forms of 'effort'".
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 23 at 10:57
  • 37
    @CodyGray Opinions cannot be right or wrong, that's not how discussions work. One purpose of meta is to decide what site the community wishes to have. I can't blame you for not remembering the "must demonstrate a minimum knowledge" close reason since it was removed by the company some 8 years back, though not through community consensus. It was there though, pretty much since the site was launched. Back in the days the ambition was to create a site useful for programmers and not for students with homework problems in order to gain maximum traffic.
    – Lundin
    Apr 23 at 12:34
  • 23
    Neither demonstrated effort nor non-beginner is required. The real problem is that such mega duplicate (or unanswerable) questions are not immediately closed as duplicates. The opposite happens: They are answered instead and there isn't any effort to find the duplicate. There ought to be some real risk of knowingly answering blatantly duplicate questions. Apr 23 at 13:32
  • 12
    @PeterMortensen Yes and since digging up duplicates is more effort than answering the question, the same boring chapter 1 beginner questions get asked and answered over and over again. One problem is that SO's duplicate system is so bad, but we've asked for a better one for as long as anyone can remember and evidently it ain't gonna happen. This is a quick solution in the meantime. I agree that the rep farmers who keep answering over and over even though a well-known duplicate exists are a big problem - it could perhaps partially be solved by weighing down-votes as heavy as up-votes.
    – Lundin
    Apr 23 at 13:49
  • 18
    It is (obviously) not in scope to add (or even consider adding) close reasons that conflict with the fundamental vision and purpose of the site. So, yes, contributions to a discussion can and will be pointed out as invalid, because they are based on wrong/flawed premises, and thus discounted entirely. Yes, I remember well the "lacks minimal understanding" close reason. It was never a "this question is too basic" close reason, and people abusing it for things like this and lack of "effort" is why the option was removed. There was strong community consensus. And it wasn't there at launch.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 24 at 13:11
  • 22
    There is no "traffic" motivation for making the site useful to everyone; that's just utter fiction and revisionist history. Nor is there any truth to this oft-repeated saw that professional or enthusiast programmers wouldn't ask or be interested in basic questions. Everyone is a beginner at something. If I try to learn Ruby today, I would be a complete beginner, and having high-quality Q&A here about very basic stuff would be exceptionally useful to me, just as is having high-quality Q&A here about the complex stuff that I seek out on a regular basis for languages that I know better.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 24 at 13:12
  • 25
    'No-one is trying to learn to program by just asking questions on SO'.......do you wish examples of exactly that? They are trivial to find:( Apr 24 at 13:37
  • 10
    I mean, 'I have basically no knowledge of for loops' stackoverflow.com/q/71984742/758133. :(( Apr 24 at 13:51
  • 15
    @RichN No? Because I lost count of the "ask on SO instead of reading chapter 1 in a book" questions many years ago. It is not too much to ask of a would-be programmer to read chapter 1 in a beginner-level book. A large part of the programmer trade is about reading technical documentation.
    – Lundin
    Apr 24 at 16:12
  • 25
    @CodyGray Since the scope has changed over the years, we can change it back. [Introducing Stackoverflow.com]: "It is by programmers, for programmers, with the ultimate intent of collectively increasing the sum total of good programming knowledge in the world." Answering some hundreds of "hello world" questions per day is not good or useful knowledge, it's spoon feeding of lazy kids who can't even bother to read chapter 1 in a beginner-level book.
    – Lundin
    Apr 24 at 16:17
  • 13
    SO has 'welcomized' the close reasons so that they no longer clearly represent questions that should surely be closed. I have no intention of spending anything more than the absolute minimum of effort on questions where the poster has made a similar, minimum effort. I will certainly not go looking for dupes or find links to 'Computer 101 week 1' sites. Too many users are taking the piss, and I don't care about their 'feelings', whether real or, much more likely, just claimed. Apr 24 at 16:41
  • 27
    @CodyGray "that conflict with the fundamental vision and purpose of the site" - which vision is that, exactly? The one of Jeff Atwood, which focused on a high quality Q/A repository (e.g. "optimize for pearls not sand") and was abandoned a long time ago? The visions (rather, hallucinations) of "Team DAG" or more recent misguided approaches which went so well that the key people are not being employed by SO anymore? Or the vision of the CEO of the company which bought SO for billions and has a ficundiary duty to shareholders to extract that much value from the site?
    – l4mpi
    Apr 25 at 11:28
  • 16
    @CodyGray "We're still increasing the sum total of good programming knowledge" - a) we still get some decent Q/A pairs but we also bury existing knowledge under a trash heap and discoverability of information is a real issue (thus it's hard to say if the "knowledge value" of SO is going up or down), and b) we're also frustrating a lot of experts who don't want to wade through trash and either quit the site or heavily restricted their interactions with it. Just because there are still some good answers being added on SO doesn't mean the site is healthy or that the status quo can't be improved.
    – l4mpi
    Apr 26 at 14:20
  • 13
    @CodyGray to TL;DR this whole discussion, many people have been fed up with garbage questions for years. The company line since the CR revamp linked by Lundin was always that "no effort" isn't directly corellated with "garbage question" because some zero-effort questions actually have value, thus there shouldn't be a "no effort" close reason as that might deprive us of a few decent questions. Ok, whatever, but we need an actual solution to the mountain of trash being dumped on SO daily, because that just makes the site worse for everyone - and nothing SO did so far worked.
    – l4mpi
    Apr 26 at 14:28
77

Realized I was writing too much in the comments, so posting this as an answer. It addresses only one close reason:

Seeking recommendations for books, tools, software libraries, and more

For context: the "recommendations" prohibition originated as a warning against threads whose result would be inherently transient, - e.g. "what's the best perf/price for graphics cards".

It then picked up a more important use as a tool against spam-honeypots, e.g. "what's the best package for charting?"

It then slowly morphed into its current state, with (sadly) a lot of that crucial context lost, leaving us where we are today: the description for the reason is simply,

This question is likely to lead to opinion-based answers.

...no mention of spam potential or even extremely transient (albeit fact-based) results. No guidance on writing about a problem vs asking for a specific form of a solution!

Convergent evolution

Meanwhile, the "opinion-based" reason has moved in the other direction: it started out as a tool against what we used to call flame-bait, e.g. "What is the worst programming language and why is it Java?"; the reason was actually titled, "subjective and argumentative" for years.

But now it just talks about facts vs opinions. Which... Does seem to bring it close to the underlying rationale for "recommendations", but ... Sorta implicitly ascribes motives to the question author that are unlikely to exist for a true recommendation question.

Taxonomy of bad questions vs guidance for good ones

Critically, the steps needed to make an "opinion" question (of the flame attracting sort) into a more constructive one are vastly different from those needed to turn a "recommendation" question (of the X-Y problem sort) into a problem statement.

THAT is the value of having a separate close reason, if we're to have one: to offer specific guidance, to closers, editors and askers, as to what a problematic question looks like and how it might be corrected.

If this reason is kept, we should strive to improve that guidance; if we cannot do so, it serves no purpose.

Further reading

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  • 5
    Keeping in mind that I've read all of the "further reading" and know all of the context—do you have a concrete recommendation regarding the value of maintaining a separate, site-specific "recommendation question" close reason (putting aside from the moment how we might rewrite the guidance to make it better), instead of collapsing all of that into the network-wide "opinion-based" close reason? If I had free reign, I'd definitely collapse them. My only hesitation is that the network-wide "opinion-based" reason's guidance doesn't seem to be editable by us.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 2 at 5:27
  • 5
    Well, that's one problem @cody; the other one is... The "reference" reason is currently used a lot more than the "opinion" reason. There'd have to be a lot of adjustment. Also... We've been through this; back before we rolled out the site-specific reasons, I went through thousands of closed questions trying to figure out why they were closed based on context... It was crazy; there were sites that had their own very specific reasons for like one reason and didn't align with anything else. Imagine trying to explain this...
    – Shog9
    Apr 2 at 20:18
  • 7
    I could not agree more with your outlook on the opinionated closure reason. Productive yet slightly subjective material is critical to success here, and it is currently stifled. Decades worth of tested and proven expert opinion is being locked away.
    – Travis J
    Apr 7 at 21:56
  • 4
    As a thought experiment,... If one were considering rewording the opinion-based close reason, ... just out of curiosity... would you have recommendations for how we could do better? I've been struggling with the dilution of it for a while but I'm not sure that I've been able to adequately get to a non-accusatory close description that manages to avoid people closing questions that may be subjective but likely fall into "good subjective". That said, I think that having different guidance in the close modal vs the post notice goes a long way. The modal can be more direct.
    – Catija StaffMod
    Apr 7 at 21:59
  • Something like "not authoritatively answerable" might work, @Catija. It is indeed a big issue that we often cling to the "opinion" word and close posts for being subjective rather than for what this reason is intended for - preventing discussions with no way to tell if a given answer is objectively good or bad. Apr 7 at 22:10
  • 4
    @Catija - imo opinionated needs to be fully remodeled. We want material which is based on specific expertise, however, often posts are closed which include any level of opinion. "Opinion-based": This question is asking for general opinions. Edit the question to address facts, references, or specific expertise."
    – Travis J
    Apr 7 at 22:17
  • I think you gotta start by asking, "what problem are we trying to solve?" and then ... Maybe asking if a close reason is the right solution at all, @Cat. I mean, the original reason... Well, back in the very early days there was a close reason for spam too; that got dropped in favor of a flag that makes ZERO effort to avoid finger-pointing. OTOH, a question that isn't straight-up flame-bait ... Maybe it doesn't need to be closed. Maybe it only needs to be closed after it attracts a pile of unsourced answers (and then you can point the finger at those answers).
    – Shog9
    Apr 8 at 6:08
  • 3
    Except that we're trying to stop the problem of a pile of unsourced, low-quality answers getting posted. Closing the door after the horse has already left the barn is hardly a compelling solution.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 8 at 7:40
  • 2
    Then let's call a spade a spade, @Cody - maybe, "Mostly attracts uninformed opinons". That'd be a great fit for questions like this one I pulled off the recent list, but not so much for questions that explicitly ask for sources (e.g. this & this). FWIW, the software engineering site (due to its history as "Programmers") has had a pile of clear & specific reasons over its history aimed at various sorts of questions that inevitably garner uninformed opinions, speculation, etc.
    – Shog9
    Apr 8 at 16:02
  • 2
    Pretty much all advice on how to write code is a developer's opinion in some way on how to best write code to solve a problem. And, we actually want educated and reasoned opinions. So, I'm definitely in favor of nuking the word "opinion" entirely from the reasoning for closing a question and find a different way to describe whatever it is that you're trying to target.
    – jfriend00
    Apr 20 at 17:12
  • 1
    @jfriend00 thing is that that reason is used elsewhere on the network, so it can be a bit more difficult to get everyone on board.
    – Braiam
    Apr 20 at 17:27
  • 2
    @Braiam - Now you're referring to some process that I'm not a part of or aware of. I'm just offering feedback that I don't think it's helpful to denigrate all "opinion" like this close reason does.
    – jfriend00
    Apr 20 at 17:33
  • 4
    @jfriend00 I wish there is a process. There's none. The last several times that the network wide reasons were changed, it was done by SE without our input.
    – Braiam
    Apr 20 at 18:33
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Not reproducible or was caused by a typo

This close reason currently contains two unrelated problems for which a given post may be closed. The "caused by a typo" part is relatively straightforward and intuitive to use whereas the "not reproducible" one clashes with the "needs debugging details" close reason (as community members failing to reproduce the problem is commonly caused by the lack of details about specific configuration / environment / browser / device, etc).

What we end up with is counter-intuitive: we use it to close questions with issues that are obsolete due to changes to the system / environment (most prominently used on Meta when certain features of the network are completely revamped or sunsetted). However, in many cases such questions are still answerable with pointers to sunset / deprecation schedules, as well as still be useful to those stuck with obsolete versions of services / software.

It is proposed that we return the reason to its original meaning and drop the "not reproducible" part. We used to have a more straightforward and intuitive wording for this reason: "too localized" (which can be further refined to "too specific" as this is exactly what it means: that the underlying issue is tightly coupled to the author's situation / code and is not helpful to anyone in slightly different circumstances).

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  • 10
    Maybe it's because I'm not a developer but "too localized" and "Too specific" are neither particularly helpful to me to understand what they mean. If what you're saying is correct, why not expand on the "Needs debugging details" reason to allow for both... "This question can't be reproduced by others either because it lacks debugging details or relates to localized settings that aren't apparent to others. To improve this question, ... {explain what needs to be added to fix the issue}." Again, as I'm not a dev, this may all be nonsense, so feel free to tell me I'm silly. :D
    – Catija StaffMod
    Apr 7 at 21:55
  • 6
    Yes, not sure why they decided to change the wording in a way that would alter the meaning. I actually brought this up two years ago when it was first changed and suggested a slight amendment that would convey the original meaning but it was never picked up. Apr 7 at 22:00
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    @41686d6564 That does seem like a vastly different thing, indeed - so, if someone says "I asked this question but now I can't seem to get the same result - I don't know what I did to 'fix' it but :shrug:, I guess it's no longer relevant"... assuming they don't delete the question themselves, this gives the closers a way to say "we don't know what happend or how this was fixed but we'll never know at this point so... let's move on to something else now."
    – Catija StaffMod
    Apr 7 at 22:02
  • 6
    @Catija - It isn't localized settings, it was worded that like that indicate that the question's usefulness would only be localized to the user asking. Debugging details are something entirely different, and specificity gets into asking for definitions. Expanding solely on debugging details would be detrimental, as we are already so narrowly painted into a corner for only helpdesking people's existing code that to go further would cause damage to the site.
    – Travis J
    Apr 7 at 22:04
  • 2
    @Catija you are silly :) Now, with the sanstioned pun out of the way, let's get to business: that's actually what I am thinking about - the primary meaning of "no repro" is that with the info provided is not sufficient, hence, yeah, "needs debugging details". As for the typo part, I think "too specific" explains well what this is about (too tightly coupled to the OPs code or situation), but not adamant on the wording. Imagine a user posting a question on a syntx error in their code - usually, it turns out they forgot a comma, a semi-colon, etc. Apr 7 at 22:05
  • 2
    I think @Oleg makes a good point here, in that the close reasons need to be decoupled and distinct. Having them overlap only makes it harder on everyone as it introduces interpretation.
    – Travis J
    Apr 7 at 22:07
  • 8
    The thing is they shouldn't overlap @Travis. They never did until two years ago when the wording was changed. Before that, the "typo" reason wasn't being used to close "no repro" questions. Those types of questions have always been closed using the "no MCVE" reason (i.e., "Needs debugging details"). The "typo" reason is for problems that are already resolved either by pointing out a simple syntax error (AKA, typo) or because the problem has "sorted itself out" for one reason or another. No-repro != no longer reproducible. Apr 7 at 22:27
  • 16
    Before changing it to "Not reproducible or...", it used to say "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers." I see that as something completely different from "Needs debugging details", so I'm against merging them. How would the question need debugging details if the problem has already been resolved? CC: @Catija Apr 7 at 22:31
  • 5
    @Catija The two close reasons are different in terms of being actionable: debugging details means there is some information missing and the OP should provide them to make the Q answerable. For typo/not reproducible the question is clear but there is nothing the OP can do - there is just either no problem at all or it is extremely specific to just the OP. No amount of adding/changing details can salvage the latter. Apr 8 at 5:37
  • 2
    The only confusion is that those were the causes that bought about as consqueuences the thing that @41686d6564standsw.Palestine puts in bold. The reason why we are closing it is later, not the former part. Maybe if we turn the whole message around: "This question was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers, it might be caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error."
    – Braiam
    Apr 20 at 17:14
  • 6
    I propose that this close reason be rephrased to something like "no need to preserve for future readers". If a question was resolved by pointing out a trivial mistake (e.g. a typo, an invalid test, etc.) then generally the question gets closed with this reason. Such questions are about programming, are specific and answerable, and indeed do get answered (often in the comments), it's just that the answer will probably not be needed by anyone else so there is "no need to preserve" it.
    – kaya3
    Apr 22 at 6:55
  • 3
    The typo reason is also used for questions whose answer is not exactly a typo, but still a silly mistake on the part of the asker. "Why does my program stop at 10?" "Well you told it to stop at 10, see here" "Oh whoops, I had left that in from some testing. Thanks!" - the essence of "not helpful for future readers" still applies.
    – user253751
    Apr 28 at 13:24
31

I often find myself typing "[I’m voting to close this question because] it is not related to programming" in the "Other" field.

I would suggest merging "About general computing hardware and software" and "About professional server- or networking-related infrastructure administration" into a more general "Not about programming".

It would be great if it were possible to point at a specific site where the question might be on topic, but that can always be done in a comment.

5
  • 3
    That (belongs on another-site) list of other Stack Exchange sites, and the question-migration feature that goes with it, should grow to include askubuntu.com, wordpress.stackexchange.com, and possibly some others (based on my limited question-answering experience).
    – O. Jones
    Apr 23 at 11:23
  • 9
    I agree. Every time I vote to close because the question belongs on RaspberryPi Stack Exchange or Software Recs, I always ask myself why we can't have a full dropdown list all SE sites to choose from instead of the arbitrary and uselss 4-5 options. Apr 25 at 22:51
  • 4
    Let's nip the "increase the migrate list" request in the bud. It ain't gonna happen; no one wants the leftover crap from Stack Overflow. We get too much junk that isn't on topic for any Stack Exchange site that no site in its collective right mind wants that crap after they've graduated. So, no, just because a question mentions Ubuntu or asks for a recommendation doesn't mean it's on topic for those sites, and unless you have a badge or twenty on those sites, they don't want the questions you're recommending. Apr 27 at 21:32
  • 4
    @HereticMonkey I agree that voting for migration from the close dialog is a bad idea, and never use it. But what if it weren't a migration vote any more? You select a site from the dropdown and it puts a comment saying "your question may be on topic here, check the posting guidelines first, etc." and registers a CV.
    – miken32
    Apr 28 at 15:29
  • @miken32 same issue. You are claiming something that isn't true. That the same question would be welcomed on the other site. Instead focus on this site, Stack Overflow, and tell them it's not appropriated here. If the asker is inclined to engage, they will figure out if there's somewhere they should ask (note that less than 5% of questions are ever edited once closed and less than that the asker engage with the feedback).
    – Braiam
    May 2 at 11:41
19

This is long overdue for Stack Overflow. We don't need to tell users where their questions might be appropriate, just that it's not appropriate here. Both SU and SF close reasons made sense when those were the only sites, but there are more.

Now we have a list of potential comments directing users to other sites, which are difficult to maintain instead of a simple single one for anyone, which doesn't require a site to exist. Below is my proposed guidance along with the text:


A community-specific reason > Not unique to software development or programming-related

"This question is not about programming"

How we define unique to software development or programming-related

Questions have to be practical and unique to software development to be on-topic on Stack Overflow. This means that questions that are not practical programming tasks or tasks not intrinsic to software development should not be asked on Stack Overflow.


How to use this reason to close questions

Before closing the question for this reason, consider the following:

Is the question on-topic on Stack Overflow? Being on-topic on another site of the network does not automatically make a question off-topic here. If the question is not on-topic on Stack Overflow:

  • Consider whether the question should be migrated to another site or closed as off-topic for Stack Overflow without migration.

My question was closed. What should I do now?

If the question is not on-topic on Stack Overflow:

  • Determine if the question is better suited for another site.
  • Before posting, please consult the Help Center section of the site to verify if your question is appropriate there.
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  • 2
    Downvoted because of people being pedantic with "unique" (1, 2, 3).
    – jpmc26
    Apr 21 at 0:38
  • @jpmc26 and yet, that's the only thing that separates this site from other "programming" sites. Also, I'm pedantic with practical too.
    – Braiam
    Apr 21 at 2:00
  • 1
    I'm not going to waste my time trying to convince you of how wrong every part of that response is; we've been through it before. But the reasons why it's completely wrong can be found in the links for people who are actually interested.
    – jpmc26
    Apr 21 at 2:10
  • 5
    One thing that occurs to me I didn't see in those links was instead of saying "unique to software development", perhaps say "specific to software development". It still conveys that it needs to be strongly software development related, without implying that it cannot be also related to anything else. I'm sure there are a number of things that should be on-topic for Stack Overflow also have applications outside of software development.
    – M. Justin
    Apr 21 at 5:40
  • Also, as used in that sentence, I think "programming related" is more correct than "programming-related".
    – M. Justin
    Apr 21 at 5:42
  • 3
    Perhaps "specific" instead of "unique"?
    – Ian Kemp
    Apr 21 at 10:04
  • @M.Justin I suggested "strongly related" in the second link. None of the words or phrases seem perfect, though. The idea is that it's something that is part of the expertise acquired with experience doing software development.
    – jpmc26
    Apr 21 at 10:52
  • @M.Justin here's the thing, we haven't need specific, but unique, to distinguish ourselves from other sites that are specific and practical to software development, like Software Engineering, Code Review, DevOps, Software QA, etc. Whiteboard issues aren't unique to software development, it's shared with other engineering tasks, so it's not unique. Quality or reviewing isn't unique either, it's basically universal. The whole thing is meant to be read as (practical software development ^ unique software development). We've (tried to) be that since inception.
    – Braiam
    Apr 21 at 10:52
  • 1
    @Braiam Wouldn't that mean that cross-cutting concerns couldn't be answered in any Stack Exchange site, assuming they all have a similar uniqueness requirement?
    – M. Justin
    Apr 21 at 15:39
  • @M.Justin if none of the sites scopes apply, then yes. But I haven't seen that. This close reason only says that it doesn't fit our scope, it doesn't need other sites to exist, which is what the off topic meant at first.
    – Braiam
    Apr 21 at 16:23
  • @Braiam There is no need to "distinguish" Stack Overflow from other Stack Exchange sites. Having overlap between them is normal and accepted. Furthermore, SO has never been limited to problems that are exclusively within the software development field; there has always been some overlap with other relevant fields. "Unique" is a word with multiple definitions; it is not saying "exclusive."
    – jpmc26
    Apr 21 at 23:27
  • 1
    @jpmc26 "has never been limited to problems that are exclusively within the software development field" well, it certainly hasn't kept itself in the same place: code golfing was moved to its own site, so was Software Engineering (previously Programmers, previously NPR), Code Review, SU and SF (!), TeX, Recommend Things, etc. The scope of SO has been narrowing down to the definition I described, and I would like the momentum to continue and shed away topics that we aren't capable of answering with quailty.
    – Braiam
    Apr 22 at 10:54
  • 1
    @M.Justin again, SO doesn't need another SE site to exist to be off topic, same the opposite way, that is on topic on one site doesn't mean it's off topic on another. For example, creating a developer account on the Google Play console is something that is intrinsic to software development, it's still off topic because it's consumer support.
    – Braiam
    Apr 22 at 15:26
  • 3
    @Braiam Let me provide concrete examples. Questions on Git. While it is primarily used for software development, it can be used for any types of documents that need versioning (web sites, documents, etc.). The general consensus seems to be that Git is on topic for Stack Overflow, but it is not unique to software development, though it is primarily used for software development. Similarly, questions on IDEs. IDEs are primarily used in software development, but one could use an IDE to design a HTML-only website (something that is arguably not software).
    – M. Justin
    Apr 22 at 21:25
  • 1
    @Braiam I wouldn't ask anyone how to "give minimal permissions to a third party piece of software." First, I'd be mad that the vendor is making me set up a user and privileges to begin with, rather than having something that automates that process. Then I'd ask the vendor what they support because no one else is going to know what is actually required. If I'm not confident that it's reasonable, I would ask someone who does work similar to what the software does whether that's really required and why (or maybe even ask the vendor why directly if it's crazy enough), which might be a dev.
    – jpmc26
    May 11 at 20:41
11

Seeking recommendations

Seeking recommendations for books, tools, software libraries, and more
This question is likely to lead to opinion-based answers.

There are several things that could be improved in this one in addition to adding "tutorials."

  • "and more" is useless text and really grinds my gears. There are much better ways to word that.
  • Requests for official documentation are allowed. See When is a resource request on-topic?
  • It would be good to mention attracting spam as well as attracting opinions.

I'd recommend updating this to:

Seeking recommendations for 3rd-party resources
Questions that ask for recommendations of non-official resources such as tools, books, software libraries, and tutorials are off-topic. Such questions are likely to attract spam and opinion-based answers.

Needs debugging details

This close reason can be removed. It is just a special case of "Needs detail or clarity." There is no need to take up a slot.

Not reproducible or was caused by a typo

"Not reproducible" is a special case of "Needs detail or clarity." "Caused by a typo" is a subset of a bigger close reason: "Not useful to others" which I am adding below. This entire close reason should be removed.

Not about programming

I suggest that a new close reason should be for blatantly off topic questions. This can be a generic replacement for the Server Fault and Super User reasons.

Not about programming
This question is not about programming or programming tools. It could be edited to clarify how it relates to programming or asked on another Stack Exchange site

Not useful to others

I suggest that a new close reason should be about the utility of resource created by the question. This would replace the "Not reproducible or was caused by a typo" reason as explained above.

Not useful to others
As currently written, this question will not be useful to others with similar problems. The goal of Stack Overflow is to build a repository of programming knowledge. Problems caused by typos or which are overly-specific to a unique situation are off-topic.

Needs customer support

I suggest that a new close reason be for Why can't I ask customer service-related questions on Stack Overflow?

Needs customer support
Stack Overflow cannot act as a customer support service on any company's behalf. Rather than asking this question here, please contact the company or organization directly.

3
  • 4
    I think there used to be a "not useful to others" close reason years and years ago.
    – miken32
    Apr 28 at 15:33
  • 3
    Indeed, it used to be called "too localized" and was apparently abused a lot as a subjective lever for closing questions. I don't necessarily agree that retiring it was the right thing to do, but that's my impression of why it no longer exists.
    – tripleee
    May 5 at 7:48
  • 1
    @tripleee IIRC, you are correct, that was the exact reason for retiring this. Although I'd much rather prefer it to be tweaked to eliminate the clairvoyance aspect of it to what we ended up with... May 5 at 7:49
7

Addressing the existing community-specific close reasons:

First of all, fix the grammar already! Inconsistent conjunctions with new community close reasons
This has been reported over and over but it's still a mess. How hard can it be to fix basic grammar?


  • About general computing hardware and software

    This one isn't used a lot. It happens now and then, when someone is actually looking for generic PC help rather than programming. I don't think the close reason is particularly useful and can probably be removed.

    Especially since we already have: "This question belongs on another site in the network" -> superuser.com.


  • About professional server- or networking-related infrastructure administration

    I don't think I've ever used this one. It can be safely removed.

    (Maybe add "This question belongs on another site in the network" -> serverfault.com as an option, but again, this is such a rare close reason.)


  • Seeking recommendations for books, tools, software libraries, and more

    Frequently used, leave it as it is.



  • Not reproducible or was caused by a typo

    Frequently used, although I don't think it makes sense to have this as a single close reason. "Not reproducible" is a very different reason than "caused by a simple typo". I think this should be split in two different close reasons.

    Questions where the problem isn't reproducible need a clarification by the OP.

    Questions where the problem was caused by a simple, uninteresting typo just needs to be permanently closed/deleted and cannot be fixed by the OP or anyone else.


  • This question belongs on another site in the network

    Currently we have these options:

    • meta.stackoverflow.com
    • superuser.com
    • tex.stackexchange.com
    • dba.stackexchange.com
    • stats.stackexchange.com

    I'm probably biased like everyone else, depending on which tags I follow, but the only ones I have ever used are meta and Super User, and neither is commonly used. Sites that I refer people to with custom close reasons far more frequently are:

    • codereview.stackexchange.com
    • electronics.stackexchange.com

There are other sites I occasionally use too, but I'd like to add these two in particular to the current list. I'd say I use these a few times per month, whereas the meta and Super User close reasons are maybe used once per year at most.

15
  • 8
    The "belongs on another network" means "good enough to migrate," right? I think it would be nice if there was also at least something for, "This question is more likely to be answered on another Stack Exchange, but is not good enough to migrate." Kind of like the General Computing/Server-Networking one. Apr 21 at 15:40
  • 1
    @GeneralGrievance I think you are looking for my proposed close reason that would replace those two. It should be used for questions that could be answered in another site, but it's not good enough as is to migrate.
    – Braiam
    Apr 21 at 16:21
  • For the questions I tend to see, Mathematics SE is the one I most frequently point people to.
    – kaya3
    Apr 22 at 7:01
  • Frequent use is at best a result of no better option, and should not be the sole reference for whether reasons are left intact. Almost all of the current close reasons contain multiple scenarios, and those need to be broken apart.
    – Travis J
    Apr 22 at 19:21
  • 1
    Did you not notice the "status-completed" tag on that question you linked? The MCVE/MRE help page is again linked in the closure banner for the "needs debugging details" reason. It has been back since I pestered Catija to do it back in October of 2021 and she stepped up immediately.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 23 at 11:00
  • 8
    "About general computing hardware and software / This one isn't used a lot." - Citation needed. I use this constantly. We get many, many questions about general computing.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Apr 23 at 16:05
  • 2
    @RyanM is correct. "About general computing hardware and software" is the 3rd most commonly used Community-Specific closure reason in the last 30 days. It's 6th overall (after Duplicate, Details or Clarity, Focus, Debugging Details, and Typo). Apr 23 at 18:49
  • @RyanM Well, this is kind of subjective: depending on what tags you view you'll get different close reasons. However, when I used to hang out in the close vote review chat, I don't think that one was common either. If someone pulls out stats proving otherwise, then it should stay, obviously.
    – Lundin
    Apr 24 at 16:20
  • @Lundin is 15 742 requests common enough for ya? :) Apr 24 at 16:31
  • 1
    Going over the quote of @RyanM, if you take some of the well known tags, you can close them all with that reason, and you will not be wrong.
    – Braiam
    Apr 26 at 19:33
  • 1
    Regarding "Belongs to another site in the network": Maybe it would make sense to have an "other" option where one can fill in other sites (ideally some kind of a search list, like in "duplicate of", so I don't have to remember if it is "math", "maths" or "mathematics")
    – chtz
    Apr 28 at 9:31
  • Try monitoring one of the cloud computing tags like aws and you will see that both of those "general computing" and "server admin" close reasons are used constantly! To be fair with all the "DevOps" stuff happening I think there is a ton of overlap between StackOverflow and ServerFault, and I often disagree when that close flag is used. It starts to feel like taxonomy for the same of taxonomy, just because programmers generally like organizing things, instead of a helpful action.
    – Mark B
    May 9 at 19:05
  • @MarkB yeah, like directing those that need a DBA towards the site where there are DBA's answering questions.
    – Braiam
    May 11 at 12:52
  • I don't find the 'belongs on another site' reason useful, not least because the sites that might be relevant to the questions I usually deal with are not on the list. Either open up the list of sites to any that are programming/computing related, or drop the reason altogether. I'd be happiest with a prioritized list of other sites (most likely first) rather than a simple alphabetic list, but I also recognize the inherent subjectivity of 'most likely'. Maybe the top ten sites could be listed in priority order, and the remainder listed alphabetically, with a marker between the two parts? May 11 at 17:49
  • @chtz: Mods of the site can migrate posts to any site, but regular users can only choose from the listed options (there can be a maximum of 5, I believe). If regular users want to suggest migrating to another site, they need to flag the post for mod attention. – In general, though, posts usually need a little editing to abide by the other site's rules/guidelines so it's sometimes better to just close the post (for not being suitable for the current site) and then encourage the user to post it to the other site themselves, after reviewing the other site's rules/guidelines.
    – V2Blast StaffMod
    May 17 at 15:21
4

I would propose additional verbiage to

4. Needs debugging details

The question should be updated to include desired behavior, a specific problem or error, and the shortest code necessary to reproduce the problem.

One of the most ignored guidelines is supplying a minimal reproducible example, but another issue with this is the perennial "Here is my code: (in an image)", or "Here is my code: (Link to offsite repository)." These are two separate but related sub issues to "Needs debugging details".

In the first, the code exists, most likely, on Stack Overflow, but it cannot be copied and pasted, requiring anyone answering the question to retype everything correctly. See this question.

In the second, the code can be manipulated, but it does not exist on Stack Overflow and therefore a deletion of the linked resource renders the question unintelligible to someone who is looking for answers to the same question. See this question. (This question also falls under the heading of failed to research, as well.)

Of course, I am not arguing that images of code or offsite links are never appropriate, but only as supplements to the base minimal reproducible example. Good reasons would be showing the location of errors, showing tutorials followed as a basis of showing things tried, etc.

My Proposal:

Amend the language in the Usage Guidance to:

The question should be updated to include desired behavior, a specific problem or error, and the shortest code necessary to reproduce the problem. Images of code, or links to offsite repositories are not acceptable forms of posting the necessary code.

1
  • 6
    One of the most ignored guidelines is supplying a minimal reproducible example - and I'd make a bet that newbies who include a minimal reproducible example have a better joining experience. May 2 at 6:13
0

I don't know where the right place to suggest these is, but there are two close reasons (perhaps community-specific) that I'd love to see added:

  • This is an obvious homework question showing no effort whatsoever, and we're not going to do your work for you.
  • This question is so lame and/or incoherent that it's not worth trying to answer.

Obviously that second one would need to be much more nicely worded so as not to be "unwelcoming", but boy, do we get lots of questions from newbies who are, well, so clueless that they appear to require months of learning before they can even ask a sensible question. (Sorry to be blunt; hope this doesn't count as being meta-unwelcoming.)

20
  • 9
    The first is an invalid close reason. The second is covered adequately by any reason that mentions the lack of clarity of the question, except for the "lame" part, which is also not ever a close reason. In general, you seem to be confusing closure with downvotes.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Apr 24 at 13:05
  • 2
    The thing about "lame" is that it is not an objective criterion that can be consistently applied as it is a function of expertise and interest - the higher the former and the lower the latter, the more likely you personally will consider a question as "lame". Close reasons, however, should not be dependent on experiences and preferences of the user voting to close - a question should be objectively lacking something (research [for dupes]; details; focus; clarity) to be eligible for closure. Apr 24 at 13:29
  • 4
    @CodyGray Thanks for your comments. I guess I need to continue my efforts to disassociate myself from this site, because I've voted to close gobs of questions for that first reason. It's another clear indication that my attitudes are irreconcilably incompatible with SO's. (I say this without rancor.) Apr 24 at 13:45
  • 6
    @OlegValteriswithUkraine I suppose shouldn't have put that word "lame" in there; it's unnecessarily provocative. Your points are well taken, although I personally feel that there are questions that are objectively so incoherent that they should be put out of their misery as soon as possible. But I'm not going to press this point. Apr 24 at 13:49
  • 4
    @SteveSummit oh, there definitely are, and a lot of them, I don't think we disagree here. Maybe it would be better to edit the answer to focus on the incoherent part? "lame" is, indeed, a trigger term implying subjective evaluation instead of objective analysis of the contents of the post. Apr 24 at 13:51
  • 12
    We don't close questions because someone's asking about their homework. We close questions if they are off-topic (too broad, too many questions in one, etc). Usually a bad homework question will fall into that off-topic case. But this does not imply that all homework questions are off-topic.
    – Makoto
    Apr 24 at 14:52
  • 3
    @SteveSummit I phrased a suggestion as "Not a question but a copy/paste of a homework assignment." here. Seems to be the very same meaning as what you intended. Though this would specifically be about "copy/paste" scenarios - asking about homework is otherwise fine if the poster has put some effort into solving it themselves.
    – Lundin
    Apr 25 at 8:59
  • 4
    Or SO could go with the phrasing we picked for Codidact here: "Off-topic: Asking for implementations of a certain feature or a whole homework assignment. You should include your (partially working) attempts in the post". This also covers other "gimme teh codez" questions when the purpose isn't necessarily ones homework.
    – Lundin
    Apr 25 at 9:04
  • 2
    Please don't force people to add crappy partially working attempts. This only makes it more complicated to combine them as duplicates, be it for the same or similar tasks. Separating them all via the countless tiny mistakes that people make provides practically no benefit to the knowledge repository. Asking "how would I do <this>?" is perfectly fine by itself, trying to play whack a mole with illdefined requirements just whittles down curators. Apr 25 at 9:09
  • 1
    @MisterMiyagi If the requirements are off then the question should be closed as unclear, no matter if there's an attempt or not. Other than that, the purpose of forcing people to post their attempts is to filter out those who only wants their work done for them, with no intention of learning anything. Those who have a genuine interest in solving the problem has made some manner of attempt. Also, posting an incorrect attempt could illuminate the root of the problem - some misunderstanding that the OP got which prevents them from solving it correctly.
    – Lundin
    Apr 25 at 9:14
  • 1
    @Lundin Looking through my most recent not answered questions... they would all have been "almost correct but..." or "do like this instead" based on some code example by the OP. Because they would have been of no benefit for practically anyone but the OP, who is likely the only one to do it almost correct in that specific way. Apr 25 at 10:32
  • 1
    @SteveSummit I am in full support of your wish for the first close reason ("obvious homework question showing no effort whatsoever") to be added, though with less provocative wording. But I'm wondering what close reason do you use for such questions right now? Usually such questions are focused, clear and on topic, especially if they are a direct transcription of a homework assignment.
    – skomisa
    May 5 at 2:11
  • 2
    @skomisa In the past, I regularly closed them with a reason of "other", filling in "...because we are not going to do your homework for you" as the comment. No one had ever complained about this, but when a mod with Cody's reputation tells me it's not a valid close reason here, I listen. Thus my comment of Apr 24 at 13:45. May 5 at 12:04
  • 3
    To be fair, @Steven, the vast majority of questions about homework on this site probably need to be closed. The nuance is that they aren't being closed because they are homework, nor because you subjectively feel that the asker didn't work hard enough on the problem themselves. Rather, they need to be closed because they fit into one of the existing close reasons, such as the question being too broad/lacking focus, and/or the question being unclear (e.g., because it lacks enough details/specifications, or because it's a work order not even a question), and/or because it's a dupe, etc.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    May 7 at 5:35
  • 2
    The "how much research effort is expected" post is a great one, and I agree with nearly everything there, but those are recommendations/expectations directed at askers, not guidance for close-voters. A lack of research effort is enshrined as an officially-endorsed downvote reason (see the tooltip on the downvote arrow for a question), but it is not, in and of itself, a close reason. See also: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/260909
    – Cody Gray Mod
    May 7 at 5:37
-10

Bad motive

The wording of the question looks like seeking something or solution that can be be used for some kind of inducement, deception or spying.
For example: fake login interface, intrusion system, beyond authorization

In earlier, I have a question that may have been downvoted by the community by this reason(I guess).

8
  • 3
    This may be a valid reason to downvote, but we don't close questions on this basis. The intent/motivation of the asker is not relevant to whether a question is acceptable on this platform.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    May 7 at 4:34
  • @CodyGray uh...well. it can be a reason of downvote, not a reason of close. But downvote is a reason of close. So it may actually is closed by bad motive, but no reason. May 7 at 5:39
  • 2
    I do not understand your comment. What do you mean by "downvote is a reason of close"? Downvotes are not a reason to close a question. Downvoting and closing are two completely separate mechanisms. Both are a form of quality control, but downvoting merely expresses a user's subjective opinion that the question is unclear, uninteresting, and/or lacks research effort, where closure is an objective statement of fact that the question, as posed, is unsuitable on Stack Overflow and therefore should not be allowed to receive answers.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    May 7 at 7:05
  • 1
    I am really uncomfortable with rating things as "evil". Something stereotypically bad like password cracking/sniffing/... can well be used to for vulnerability detection and prevention. Some well accepted practices like scraping or simply automation can do incredible harm by sheer volume and carelessness. May 7 at 10:04
  • @MisterMiyagi Ok, let me change that discription. Your quesion -> The wording of the question May 7 at 10:33
  • @CodyGray ok, I see now. Now I changed the discription of the "bad motive". What if the question reads as if the author intends to do some bad things?? May 7 at 10:38
  • 1
    "The intent/motivation of the asker is not relevant to whether a question is acceptable on this platform."
    – Cody Gray Mod
    May 7 at 10:54
  • 1
    "bad motive" requires those with the CV/RV privilege to exercise clairvoyance. We do not have or intent to have such a close reason as intent is, indeed, irrelevant to a Q&A platform. If users believe the post is purposefully malicious, they can report the post via flagging, explaining in detail why they think it is made by a malicious actor. If your post was closed explicitly for the reason of intent, that was an incorrect closure (although I do not see any non-deleted recent posts by you that are closed because of that. May 7 at 10:58

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