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I shared a self-answered Q/A on a small stupidity, just to share this since this stupidity still had taken some minutes, and nothing could be found on the internet since it - yes - was a stupidity.

Talking about Should 'if name == "main":' in Python have a type hint ' -> None'? .

Just 10 seconds after asking, and with my quite lengthy answer coming with it that you cannot even read in 10 seconds, a comment popped up with the mere core of the answer. This is understood: in this short time, you do not look around, you just write quickly since it is a sort of tournament of who is first and right.

10 seconds is the mere writing time to make the comment at all. It is quite clear that my answer was not read. If there is an answer that comes with the question, it should get a time-out for comments of a minute so that you can at least catch with a first glimpse

  • that there is an answer,
  • that the answer is by the OP (you might oversee that in a rush),
  • of what that answer is about before you post a comment.

It is likely not needed for answers since it is up to your own risk not to duplicate an answer. Comments do not bear any risk for reputation or closing points.

Since my question was about a mere stupidity, the risk is that others may see the answer as a follow-up of the comment. The comment got highly upvoted, in a few minutes and then hours. I guess that when you find a stupid question, you want to click somewhere, so you vote the comments. And you do not read the answer anymore to see that the comment was duplicating it.

What about comments that duplicate answers in a few seconds? A short time-out would be helpful. It is a bit like

Is self answering within the same minute an allowed behavior? which also asks generally about time-outs, though misunderstanding the system. But it is a bit of the same debate in that.

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    I'm sorry, but I just don't agree that self-answered questions should be treated differently than others. Mar 31 at 20:10
  • 5
    people aren't expected to read all answers before requesting clarification on the question.
    – Kevin B
    Mar 31 at 20:13
  • @KevinB It is not a clarification on the question. It is an answer in the comment. Mar 31 at 20:13
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    But your proposal isn't to block specific kinds of comments, which is technically implausible, so whether or not that particular comment is a clarification isn't relevant.
    – jonrsharpe
    Mar 31 at 20:15
  • @jonrsharpe Yes, it is not relevant since this feature request of a time-out would not have the issue at all anyway. Mar 31 at 20:17
  • arguably, requesting clarification, can very easily be an answer if the question is excessively basic. "Is that missing semi-colon a typo?"
    – Kevin B
    Mar 31 at 20:17
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    eh, what's stopping you from NLN'ing the comment? And even if it stays, what's the problem? You post a self-answered Q&A pair to share knowledge, not to gain imaginary points. Those who want to read the answer still will regardless of the comment. Mar 31 at 20:23
  • @questionto42standswithUkraine What makes self-answered / canonical questions stand out above others? Just study the successful ones @questionto42standswithUkraine please! Mar 31 at 20:25
  • @πάνταῥεῖ My Q/A of the example is not good anyway. I hope it is clear that the answer is already there at once and that makes the difference, since I thought comments should try to aim at following with an answer. That was my understanding up to now. I thought that the first person commenting also has the right to answer. I think I can accept the answer given since that says a lot what I did not know. I thought commenting under the question is sort of a tournament who is first to answer. Mar 31 at 20:27
  • @questionto42standswithUkraine ". I though that the first person commenting also has the right to answer. ... I thought commenting under the question is sort of a tournament who is first to answer." sorry, that's complete nonsense. Mar 31 at 20:30
  • @πάνταῥεῖ well, it's technically true I suppose (the first part), but everyone else does too Mar 31 at 20:32
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    "Just 10 seconds after asking, and with my quite lengthy answer coming with it that you cannot even read in 10 seconds, a comment popped up with the mere core of the answer." and "10 seconds is the mere writing time to make the comment at all." - you're building this entire point around the 10 second timeframe yet...the comment was posted 2 minutes (2022-03-30 23:12:56Z) after the Q&A was (2022-03-30 23:10:43Z). Which is more than your proposed minute of timeout. Turns out your proposal doesn't solve the situation you showed for it.
    – VLAZ
    Mar 31 at 21:47
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    Some people read faster than others. And type faster.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 31 at 23:41
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    Independent of this Meta question, your self-answered Q&A is perfectly fine. In fact, it seems like a useful contribution to our knowledge bank. I've re-opened it. Ping me or raise a flag if it gets closed again (unless someone finds a good duplicate).
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 31 at 23:48
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    On self-answered questions, you should preempt such comments by posting your own comment (prepared in advance and posted a few seconds after posting the question), countering predictable objections and answering what is not obvious (e.g., "Why is he/she answering his/her own question? That looks weird. Let me downvote."). If nothing else, then that self-answered questions are perfectly acceptable and even encouraged (many users misunderstand this, e.g. misinterpreting self-answered questions as a rep-harvesting scheme). You can link to and quote meta questions about this in the comment Apr 2 at 0:34

1 Answer 1

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No thanks.

That a question has been self-answered has no relevance on comments. A self-answered question is no different than any other question.

I won't necessarily read all (or any) of the answers to a question before posting a comment. (I would if posting an answer).

Comments address the post they are posted under (or at least that's how it should be).

Users are in no way required to read answers, nor should be required. A question should stand on its own, not be supported by existing or potential answers.

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