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I was halfway through typing a boilerplate comment welcoming someone to Stack Overflow and selecting the appropriate help links to read in order to ask the question properly, when I noticed that the user in question had multiple gold badges and a fairly high reputation score. Then I noticed that the username seemed familiar. Then I checked that user's comment history and noticed multiple questions asked within the last few weeks, perhaps one a day on average. I browsed through some of those and saw that they were of comparably low quality (although not always because of the same problems) and typically downvoted or with close votes outstanding. Only a couple had accepted answers.

I'm not sure the user in question is interested in getting better at asking questions per the site guidelines, or in engaging with the community in a productive manner. However, again - multiple gold badges, so presumably that desire was there in the past.

Can I do anything here? I'm worried I'll lose my cool if I keep stumbling upon such questions from the same person.

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    I'm not sure that multiple gold badges is a reasonable measure (in general) for quality content. There are many ways to get gold badges that don't correlate to being good at asking (or answering) questions. Fanatic and Marshal as examples. Publicist and Famous Question also doesn't necessarily mean "good at asking questions" it may just mean the question/link has been around a while. We have more than a few questions with 10k views but with low score/engagement. Mar 26 at 4:59
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    @HenryEcker Good point. Looking into it further, they're all "Famous Question" badges - and the first one I checked seems blatantly off topic to me. I would definitely have voted to close it - yet it sits at +5. I guess that's just the state of the site now. Mar 26 at 5:10
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    There's a lot of content that's been around a long time. In particular with the "Famous" badges there are more than 35 thousand "Famous" questions (and by extension 35 thousand gold badges) with score less than or equal to 0. I just like to remind people that things like views (and even reputation) can just accrue over time and may not actually indicate anything other than the age of the content. Mar 26 at 5:18
  • These questions are more recent, though. Mar 26 at 5:20
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    It is a well-known strategy to earn loads of sweet reputation points: ask (literally) thousands of low-quality questions and ignore the downvotes, etc. Upvotes will more than make up for it, especially compound interest from the ones with a net positive score. An example is user "oo" (now by a different name), noticed back in 2009 (7106 reputation points on 2009-09-02T10:45:00. And now nearly 2,000 questions and nearly 200,000 reputation points. It only (effectively) stopped around 2016.). Mar 26 at 13:29
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    Don't lose your cool. There are 22,388,950 questions to tend to and very few new questions are valuable. In the grand scheme of things it doesn't matter. A higher impact may be by concentrating on the questions that search engines pick (e.g., by the view rate (global), the view rate for a particular tag, or the view rate for newer questions). Mar 26 at 14:10
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    I think I've seen this user a few times already. He's starting bounties on his own questions, so they can't be closed or deleted. That makes them famous, thus the gold badges. I guess he's getting his job done this way. He just knows how to game the system. He's successful in some way. Mar 26 at 19:57
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    After reading all this, I would bet a $100 the asker will never improve. But now my OCD is more interested in knowing who the question asker actually is. :-)
    – T-Heron
    Mar 27 at 5:02
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    Unfortunately a points recalculation would not help in the case of users assiduously asking borderline questions at the rate of two or three a day - we have had users of that type achieving 50k+ scores. Some of them merely regard any criticisms they receive as evidence the site isn't welcoming, and they increase their rate of asking merely to assert their liberty to do so.
    – halfer
    Mar 27 at 10:24
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    To be clear: my concern is not with such users gaining reputation. I just want people who come to the site to use it as it was intended to be used. Mar 27 at 20:56
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    Ban him. Simple as that. Mar 28 at 12:17
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    I've got a spreadsheet of 60 users I've come across organically in Stack Overflow where I've noticed they exhibit behavior like this. Together, they have 2,034 answers, 24,703 questions, an average of 8,254 reputation, and ask an average of 11.84 questions for every answer they post. I feel like they are a significant source of low quality and set a bad example for new users. However, the upvotes are weighted more than downvotes and thus their sheer volume of posts keeps them from avoiding repercussions. I've been sitting on this a while, as I'm not sure how to frame a Meta post about it.
    – mason
    Mar 28 at 13:42
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    @mason "How we can focus welcoming effort or new users worth welcoming rather on people persistently posting thousands of low quality questions"? Mar 28 at 14:08
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    @PeterMortensen Re:"It is a well-known strategy..." Seriously? There are people who care that much about rep? Why? Just to feel important and throw around their moderation privileges? Some people need to get a life.
    – Mentalist
    Mar 29 at 5:18

2 Answers 2

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Raise a custom moderator flag and explain your concerns in detail. We have a "consistently low-quality questions over time" template message that we can send them. It reads something like this (and can, of course, be easily customized to fit a specific case):

We really want you to have a good experience here, and the first step to that is making sure that questions you submit are clear, on topic and provide all of the information someone would need to answer. You may have noticed that questions you’ve asked weren’t well received by the community; they were downvoted and closed.

Specifically, we would like to highlight these questions:

  • TODO

There are a number of potential reasons for this and we’d like to help you diagnose exactly what’s happening. Questions may be downvoted and closed because they fit one of our closure criteria, or are of the type that we’d prefer users refrain from asking. While we’re excited that you’re contributing, we ask that you please take some time to read the information linked below - prior to asking another question - in order to assure the best possible experience (both for yourself, and also for other community members):

We're generally happy to send a message like this if the problem is brought to our attention, but the scale of Stack Overflow is so large that we cannot reasonably go looking for these cases or send the messages proactively.

Downvoting low-quality questions is, of course, always encouraged, and has more effect than people realize—both at the system level and as a form of personal catharsis, as you move along to things that are a better use of your time.

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    I habitually do not downvote questions below 0 because it seems redundant with the closure mechanism (speaking as someone with the rep to cast close votes!) and because it seems unnecessarily punitive in that context (if the question can be taken out of the running for answering, then there is no need to try extra hard to sort it to the bottom). But maybe the psychological negative feedback is useful in cases like this. Mar 26 at 5:05
  • explain your concerns in detail. We have a "consistently low-quality questions over time" template message that we can send them. It's not clear to me what "detail" involves when the problem is (as I would most instinctively put it) "the user consistently fails to demonstrate research effort or take steps to produce an MRE" - is that enough in itself? Mar 26 at 5:07
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    Downvoting is not redundant with closure. They serve different purposes. Closure means the question cannot be answered in its current form and needs improvements. Also, downvotes feed back into the system in ways that closure doesn't. I think you'll have to be the judge of what level of detail is appropriate on a case-by-case basis. Note that custom mod flags are limited to 500 characters, so you won't be allowed to go overboard with detail. I just always say this because I'm tired of handling "Go Fish!"-style flags that say "duplicate answer", "bad question", and so on.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 26 at 5:12
  • (hmm... apparently I already answered the same question with exactly the same content as here - meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/398811/… - clearly means I agree with this answer :) ) The question whether flagging and subsequent mod note actually change user's behavior is still interesting to me. Mar 26 at 5:25
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    I took my best shot at writing the flag message, thanks. Mar 26 at 5:33
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    I've no idea if it actually helps, @Alexei. No one has done a study on that, or at least not one that I am aware of. But it's not that hard, either for you to raise a flag requesting or for us to send the message. Sending the message also has an additional benefit: it creates an item in the user's history that gives us justification to ratchet up the penalty in future messages, if the behavior does not improve.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 26 at 5:34
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    If you feel it's a waste of your time, or our time, then don't bother raising the flag. It's not a requirement, just an option available to you. Downvoting is easier, simpler, and works just as well, if not better.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 26 at 5:45
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    Downvoting past 0 definitely helps, @KarlKnechtel . The scores of all the users questions, including their deleted ones, is considered by the ban algorithm. A user with many 0 score questions and several 1+ would likely be looked upon more favourably by the algorithm than one with many negatively scored questions and a few with 1+ scores. If the user's really has been posted such poor quality posts recently then downvoting those questions can (will) push them towards a potential ban; reputation doesn't matter.
    – Larnu
    Mar 26 at 20:22
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    On the downvoting, make sure you judge the question on its merits, though. Make sure you vote just as you would if another user asked it, ignoring reputation and history. If you rarely downvote and this specific user hits a nerve, make sure you start voting more, both up and down, to avoid serial voting issues. And after this reply, don't go thinking yes, I should've downvoted those and retroactively downvote many posts by that user.
    – Erik A
    Mar 26 at 20:29
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    @KarlKnechtel Those who downvote bad content are constructively working in concert with human and automated content curators who/which delete content. This layer of housekeeping is super important. There are loads of bad questions and answers that Stack Overflow retains purely because the vote score is out of reach to curators. If you see content that is "bad", lower the score so that others can help make this community better for researchers. Mar 27 at 2:42
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    I see multiple comments in support of the notion of downvoting bad questions in addition to just closing them. My question here is: isn't the purpose of closing a question, to indicate that it does not meet the site standards (thus, that OP needs to do something to fix it) - and won't be useful to third parties, as is? Why, therefore, doesn't closing the question take it out of the public listing? And if it did, why wouldn't that be good enough? Because of reputation? But a single upvote cancels several downvotes of reputation. The ban algorithm could be adjusted accordingly, too. Mar 27 at 21:26
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    @KarlKnechtel there's multiple things at play, including reputation, automatic question bans, and auto-deletion of questions - look up the SO roomba for example. The TL;DR is 1) always, always, always downvote bad content, and 2) if it's a question and it's closeable, also cast a close vote. Only exception to 1) would be if you want to save your limited daily downvotes for even worse content.
    – l4mpi
    Mar 28 at 11:26
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    Re: downvoting, didn't answers with a score of -6 or lower get Roomba'd?
    – walen
    Mar 28 at 11:28
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    @KarlKnechtel The problem with not downvoting below zero is that then it's hard to distinguish between a question that just hasn't been voted on yet and one that has serious content problems. It's definitely useful for future readers to see how serious the quality problems are. A question with a score of -1 or -2 might just have minor problems, whereas a question with a score of, for example, -10 probably has severe problems and likely isn't worth reading (and may require further moderation action, such as closure or flags). Mar 28 at 14:36
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    @walen Posts with 6 red flags (i.e. R/A or spam) from the community will be auto-deleted. Closed questions with a score of -3 or lower are eligible for immediate deletion by 20k+ users. Any closed question (regardless of score) is eligible for deletion by 10k+ users after 2 days of being closed, but the number of votes required to delete it depends on the net score of the question. (Questions with high net scores require more delete votes from the community). Mar 28 at 14:38
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TL;DR

Upvote if good post, downvote if bad post.


What should I do about an experienced user with a history of asking bad questions?

Do you think that Stack Overflow's current automated and manual moderation is not doing enough?

What is your desired outcome?

Do you suspect their account has been hacked?


multiple gold badges and a fairly high reputation score

And??

I'd say I have a fairly good amount of rep and a lonely gold badge but I still don't feel I can confidently formulate a good question.


Then I checked that user's comment history and noticed multiple questions asked within the last few weeks, perhaps one a day on average. I browsed through some of those and saw that they were of comparably low quality (although not always because of the same problems) and typically downvoted or with close votes outstanding.

So, are these low-quality questions in tags which the user has a high score in?

Maybe they've taken on a new language/technology and are still getting their feet wet.

At one point I was tasked with fixing/writing a Perl script for a production process and I asked terrible questions because the Perl terminology was ever so slightly different than PHP.


I'm not sure the user in question is interested in getting better at asking questions per the site guidelines, or in engaging with the community in a productive manner. However, again - multiple gold badges, so presumably that desire was there in the past.

Sure, probably.


Can I do anything here? I'm worried I'll lose my cool if I keep stumbling upon such questions from the same person.

There is only one person who should be in control of your cool, you.

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    In regards to your terrible Perl questions you mentioned: I don't believe that unfamiliarity with the language has anything to do with asking a good question or not. It's still on you to properly research and to include everything expected of a good question, such as a minimal reproducible example when appropriate. I've never written a line of Perl either, but the standards for what makes a good question don't change just because it's a language I'm not familiar with.
    – mason
    Mar 28 at 19:04
  • @mason I'm not asking for anyone to turn a blind-eye. I was properly flogged. I was just offering an explanation for the behavior, not seeking to condone it.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Mar 28 at 19:10
  • @mason I added a TL;DR. Hope it helps.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Mar 28 at 19:12

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