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I came across an answer some days ago which was an exact copy of a comment on another answer to the same question (screenshot). After downvoting the answer, I flagged it for moderator intervention explaining that the answer was an exact copy of the linked comment without proper attribution and asked for the answer to be deleted.

The exact text of the flag was: "This answer is a direct copy of a comment on the question without proper attribution. I suggest to delete this answer. Link to comment: [...]"

This flag was declined with the note "comments are fair game" which I find quite peculiar.

I agree that a comment can be turned into an answer by anyone willing to do so. However, giving appropriate credit is still a requirement under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license. The copied answer therefore directly violates these terms and is clearly plagiarised in full. If the original content should not be a comment, it could be directly added to the accepted answer.

Here are my questions:

  • Are verbatim copies of comments without attribution tolerated? If yes, to what extent and how would this be compatible with the CC BY-SA 4.0 license?
  • How should such situations be handled properly (without the privilege to vote for deletion of the answer)? → I'm interested in a general guide on how to approach this.
  • Why was my flag declined and no action taken by the moderator? → This is only a secondary question in order to improve flagging in the future and understand the rationale behind the decision.
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    The attribution to "answer in comment" is kind of an interesting matter since the comment will possibly get deleted as "no longer needed" after that, and the link will be useless for anyone other than mods.
    – Andrew T.
    Mar 16 at 14:29
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    @AndrewT. And how does that matter? Those words are still not yours. Just because "some" users can't verify the attribution anymore doesn't mean that you're not obligated to properly attribute stuff taken from someone else.
    – Tom
    Mar 16 at 14:34
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    @NickstandswithUkraine The suggested duplicate does not exactly fit this case as I'm not asking from the perspective of the plagiarised user. Additionally, the copied comment was an answer to a follow-up question that got asked and answered in the comments – so it cannot be argued that the plagiarised answer attempted to address the original question. A post already existed that could have easily been edited to add the content; there was no need to add an additional answer. I'm interested in a generalised guide on how to handle such situations.
    – Matt
    Mar 16 at 14:53
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    Comments are not that "fair game". This shouldn't be a matter of an opinion, the comments are licenced as well as other parts of the posts, the fact that a comment can be removed at any time doesn't make an exception to the terms of the licence.
    – Teemu
    Mar 16 at 15:34
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    "comments are fair game" This feels contradictory to an answer I have flagged in the past that was a copy pasta of one of my own comments, without citation or attribution, which I flagged and was removed. I'll admit that the user in question was a repeat offender (I ended up find 17 of their answers were plagiarised) but still just posting a comment as your own answer, cited or not, feels "wrong". Answers are meant to be the majority of your own content, and simply quoting someone else's comment doesn't do that. At least, (as linked by Zoe) such as answer should be an CW answer.
    – Larnu
    Mar 16 at 15:50
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    While I'm not the moderator who declined the flag, I have a couple of relevant answers which explain my opinion on the underlying question of attribution for a copied comment, but they are not direct duplicates. They are: answer to: 'A: Comment "no longer needed" flag declined, but comment removed anyway?', which explains that attribution is required when copying a comment; and answer to: "Removing Documentation: Reputation, Archive, and Links" which explains my understanding of what is required for attribution/copying under the CC BY-SA license.
    – Makyen Mod
    Mar 16 at 16:50
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    Relevant meta.serverfault.com/a/1931/180142
    – Braiam
    Mar 17 at 14:23
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    If the issue was that the answer lacked attribution, why would the correct response be to delete it? You should just add the missing attribution. Mar 17 at 23:04
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    @SteveBennett In this case, the answer didn't actually attempt to answer the original question but was a plagiarised response to a follow-up question in the comment thread of the other answer. Therefore, lacking attribution was not the only issue with this answer as it did not fundamentally answer the question.
    – Matt
    Mar 18 at 6:47
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    Whenever I post an answer-comment on a question, I do so with the intent that anyone else can turn that into an answer, and I specifically don't want attribution (if I wanted to post an answer, I would've posted one). Although in this case the comment was a follow-up by someone who already posted an answer, for which the above doesn't apply (and it was on an answer, not on the question, as your flag said). Also, it was an exact copy, which does cross the line into plagiarism (and/or likely bot) in my opinion and I would expect an answer to expand on a comment (since comments are usually short) Mar 18 at 20:01
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    FYI, there's a significant difference between "direct copy" and "exact copy". An "exact copy" is word-for-word the same. Some may interpret "direct copy" to mean "exact copy", but for others the meaning wouldn't really be that much different from just "copy" (the opposite of "direct" is "indirect", and an indirect copy would presumably mean you copied from something that was already a copy, or you went about creating the copy in a more roundabout way). Mar 18 at 20:21
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    @BernhardBarker Thanks for pointing out the difference between "exact copy" and "direct copy" as I was not aware that their meaning is actually that much different. I changed the wording in the question now to be more precise by using "exact copy".
    – Matt
    Mar 18 at 20:35

3 Answers 3

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Are verbatim copies of comments without attribution tolerated? If yes, to what extent and how would this be compatible with the CC BY-SA 4.0 license?

In my opinion, this shouldn't be allowed. If a comment taught you how to answer a question (and the commenter didn't post the answer themselves), by all means, post the answer! But do so in your own words.

I would (and recommend to) always add attribution when copying a comment verbatim. I would format it in a quote, and include something like "By @UserName in the comments".

How should such situations be handled properly (without the privilege to vote for deletion of the answer)? → I'm interested in a general guide on how to approach this.

Honestly, I probably would've done the same thing you did if I saw this; flag the answer for moderator intervention. But as of now, we know that the flag would get declined...

I want to say the next best thing is to edit the post, but one would need >2K rep to have their edits applied immediately, and suggesting an edit would likely have the edit declined by the user who posted the answer.

Another option would be to ping the author of the comment to make sure that they're aware of the situation. If they don't mind, then it's sort of problem solved.

Why was my flag declined and no action taken by the moderator? → This only a secondary question in order to improve flagging in the future.

The reason your flag was declined was pretty much clearly stated in the note left by the moderator: "comments are fair game". I'm not saying I agree with this, and I hope that pasting other user's comments in answers would require proper attribution in the future.

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    About the "suggesting an edit would likely have the edit declined by the user who posted the answer.", that's definitely something that should be mod-flagged. It's basically the same as rolling back an edit that adds attribution. Also, re your last sentence: attribution is definitely required, even for the first post, it's just that it doesn't need mod intervention to add that attribution in.
    – cigien
    Mar 17 at 1:34
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    @cigien If the statement that "comments are fair game" still stands, then what good would flagging the rejected edit do?
    – Ann Zen
    Mar 17 at 2:39
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    I'm guessing that the mod message was in response to the flag asking for the answer be deleted since it's a copy-paste of a comment. That's not a reason to delete an answer. Flagging the answer if the user rejects the edit adding attribution is to notify mods that the answer needs attribution, and that regular users have done what they can already. To be clear, flagging the answer after the edit is rejected would not be in order to delete the answer.
    – cigien
    Mar 17 at 2:47
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    @cigien "That's not a reason to delete an answer." Correct me if I'm wrong... but you wrote in your answer that if you were to flag the post, you would include in your flag "At a minimum, the answer should be deleted".
    – Ann Zen
    Mar 17 at 3:34
  • Yes, but because it doesn't attempt to answer the question, not because it lacks attribution. I mention both those things clearly in the paragraph above.
    – cigien
    Mar 17 at 3:55
  • @cigien I see. So in your words, a NAA flag would also suffice?
    – Ann Zen
    Mar 17 at 4:00
  • No, a NAA flag would not be appropriate because it looks like an answer. It requires looking at the comment on the other question to realize that it's not an attempt at answering the question, which means it needs a custom mod flag to explain that.
    – cigien
    Mar 17 at 4:20
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    Even if the answer is in "your own words", this still (can) be plagiarims: since plagiarism is not about the exact words, but about stealing someones "intellectual product": it is pretending that you came up with something, but in reality someone else did. Of course verbatim copying is easier to detect than writing the same concept in your own words. Mar 17 at 7:41
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    @WillemVanOnsem >90% of all answers are telling things the answerer learned somewhere. The whole point of Stackoverflow is to spread knowledge and of course, those who learned at Stackoverflow are permitted to come back and teach. If someone thinks their idea is unique and must not be retold without attribution, they should post it as an answer instead of a comment.
    – Holger
    Mar 17 at 9:23
  • This answer gives conflicting advice. The first bit is correct; copying comments without attribution is not allowed by site rules, so saying "it should not be allowed" is correct. The wording about "should not" and "would" are irrelevant because there is a clear legal requirement to do so, let alone a site rule. However, the end of the first paragraph is a totally separate recommendation that is not necessary ("do so in your own words".
    – TylerH
    Mar 17 at 15:03
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    Stack Overflow is a collaborative site; if someone posts an answer in a comment, you can convert that exact content to an existing (or new CW answer) instead so long as you attribute it properly. There's no need to rewrite the contents, which I would argue is more 'plagiaristic' (or rather, untoward, at least) behavior than simply posting the contents as they originally were. This way you are not putting words in the original author's mouth or stealing content that you didn't originate.
    – TylerH
    Mar 17 at 15:03
  • @TylerH If you think it would be more 'plagiaristic' to explain a concept you learned from a comment in your own words, are you saying that if a user writing an answer noticed that someone just posted a comment explaining the same concept, they would be inclined to give credit to the commenter to avoid being seen as 'plagiaristic'?
    – Ann Zen
    Mar 17 at 15:21
  • @AnnZen It certainly depends on how much effort someone puts in. If someone learns of the existence of a concept and then studies that concept, and from that study writes a novel, thorough answer of that concept, sure... that's not plagiarism. But that's also not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about your recommendation, which is simply "post the answer in your own words". Simply moving a few words around or substituting a new word here or there (which is what your suggestion implies to me) is still plagiarism. At the very least, it is not totally honest.
    – TylerH
    Mar 17 at 15:23
  • A comment isn't enough space to present a solution complicated/advanced enough to rise to the level of being something anyone couldn't have just come up with on their own on the spot. This whole plagiarism issue with comments is moot.
    – Kevin B
    Mar 17 at 15:25
  • @TylerH The way I interpret it, the term "in your own words" is definitely not simply moving a few words around or substituting a new word here or there.
    – Ann Zen
    Mar 17 at 15:28
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Am I the only one who sees that the original comment was made below an answer and doesn't make the slightest sense outside that context? Of course it should be deleted - because the answer is completely useless and senseless. It is not an answer to the question. It does not attempt to answer the question.

If we are just discussing if this answer should be deleted or not, then it's a no-brainer and we need not even need to start the discussion of copyright/plagiarism. This is perhaps the 100th time or so I make this argument on meta: crap needs to be deleted. It should not be hugged, it should not be polished, it should not be put on a pedestal in a museum for the benefit of future generations. It needs to go, period.

Still over and over we have this incredibly tiresome attitude from moderators and meta veterans: "I could delete this crap and make the site a better place, but I won't because you filled out the wrong form." This should simply have be deleted and it isn't important what label we put on the crap prior deletion.


Then of course there's a second thing to consider here, namely if disciplinary actions should be taken against the poster for plagiarism. It's quite likely that the moderator only considered this part of the flag and not the quality of the answer.

Traditionally, the stance have been "comments are not important". Someone posting an answer as a comment shouldn't be upset if someone takes that comment and posts it as an answer - this is generally fair game. Although making a verbatim copy of the comment is quite lazy and possibly even a copyright issue(?).

No matter, plagiarizing someone else's text verbatim without attribution given is rude, it's a CoC violation for that reason. Tactful, polite answerers who grabs someone's comment and post it as answer do so as a community wiki, meaning they won't benefit from it themselves. And give attribution to the person who commented. This ought to be the highly recommended approach to situations like this.

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  • I was actually wondering what the answer was for. Not for the rep because the question is technical so someone who went that far would immediately see that it does not tmake sense (even without looking,g at the comment). I wonder what drives such 1 point accounts (5 months old)
    – WoJ
    Mar 18 at 12:55
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    OP did notice, but they asked about the declined flag, which was about plagiarism.
    – Teemu
    Mar 18 at 13:18
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    +1 for the first half of the answer. In the second half, "Although making a verbatim copy of the comment is [...] possibly even a copyright issue(?)" -- the comment is posted under the CC by-SA license, which says you can copy it as long as you give attribution. So it is a copyright issue. But moderators don't police copyright issues on this site, I'm told. :/ Mar 18 at 15:04
  • @WoJ The question had a bounty at the time, so they were probably hoping to get the bounty. Mar 19 at 10:46
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I think the flag was declined because it doesn't require a moderator intervention. You can handle it yourself.

  1. Edit the answer

  2. Put the comment in a quotation block

  3. Add a link to the comment together with the commenter's name.

Only if the author of the answer rolls it back, flag for moderator intervention.

There's nothing inherently wrong with reposting a comment as an answer, and such answers need to have proper attribution. It is wrong though, to post an answer in a comment.

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    This means that no flag for plagiarism can be justified, as the same steps can always be followed whether the original source is a comment, another answer, or a blog post? Mar 16 at 14:33
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    @francescalus No. This is only relevant for reposting comments and/or answers added as edits in questions. We have no other tools of moving the content into relevant space. The usual way is to mark it as CW or use quotation box and attribute it to the original poster. The intent is unlikely to be plagiarism, just trying to put the content into the right place where it belongs.
    – Dharman Mod
    Mar 16 at 14:35
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    I feel this misses that moderator intervention is also relevant for calling attention to the plagiarism being unwanted, to put it mildly. Me editing attribution into an answer is just pedantic cleanup that people can shrug off and then carry on. A moderator action seems like a whole different level. That plagiarism might be unintentional is all the more reason to call attention to it. Mar 16 at 14:56
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    "The intent is unlikely to be plagiarism" - when is the intent to be plagiarism? Most people who copy from external sources to so for at least one of these reasons: rep, wanting to answer, or wanting more answers so their profile looks better on a CV/portfolio/similar. The vast majority of plagiarists don't plagiarise content for the sake of plagiarising content Mar 16 at 15:20
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    @ZoestandswithUkraine Whenever someone wants to take credit for someone else's work... which is quite often on the internet.
    – TylerH
    Mar 16 at 19:39
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    I'm not sure why this is so heavily downvoted. It is the correct response.
    – TylerH
    Mar 16 at 19:40
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    @TylerH I'm a little surprised at the number of downvotes too, but I suspect many of the downvotes are not necessarily because the answer is wrong, but because users want it to be wrong. That's understandable; when I got a declined flag on the grounds that I should just edit it myself, I was a little put off, and definitely considered posting about it on meta. (It was an instance of undisclosed affiliation in that case, but that's similar to this case).
    – cigien
    Mar 16 at 20:30
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    @cigien why are you defining how users are voting?. In my case, I do think it's wrong, not just "want it to be wrong".
    – Lamak
    Mar 16 at 20:44
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    @Lamak Could you clarify which part of the answer you feel is wrong exactly? I'm curious, because I can't really spot anything that's factually incorrect in this answer, and am interested in knowing what I'm missing.
    – cigien
    Mar 16 at 21:03
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    @cigien being "factually correct" doesn't mean I agree with the premise. Yes, the user could do these things, but no, I think that a mod should have deleted it as a first step...as simple as that. The fact that you feel that people are downvoting this answer because they want it to be wrong just doesn't make sense to me
    – Lamak
    Mar 17 at 1:18
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    I don't see how "comments are fair game" would lead to "I think the flag was declined because it doesn't require a moderator intervention.". At least to me, "fair game" means to me that nothing needs to be done, not just that nothing needs to be done by a moderator. Since the rest of the answer hinges on this interpretation, yes, I think it's wrong. Mar 17 at 7:05
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    I do admittedly have a problem with "It is wrong though, to post an answer in a comment.". Plagiarism is a serious issue in my book, and it is sugarcoated by this answer with attribution being "nice to have" and there being "nothing inherently wrong with reposting". This is a very stark contrast to calling out that the initial author for just not wanting to write a full answer with speculation, and in this case even as a direct reply to another comment. Mar 17 at 7:16
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    As for the downvote, I don't think the proper response is to have a member of the community, properly cite and quote material for another user. I think the proper response is for a moderator to get involved, remind them of our citation and quotation requirements, and handle it appropriately based on the user's history. I also feel that "It would be nice to have a proper attribution.", is just plain wrong. Mar 17 at 8:25
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    @TylerH I have zero interest playing ball with you when the game is "you just said". I didn't say what you claim I did. We're past the third round. Let's call it a day. Mar 17 at 15:54
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    @TylerH My issue is still the same as before: Sugarcoating plagiarism while calling out a red herring. FWIW, I deleted one snarky comment as far as I remember, because it was superseded by a reply from you while I was editing. The rest seem to be removed by someone else. So I would appreciate if you would stop assuming things about me. Mar 18 at 6:00

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