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This site of Stack Overflow is designed to sit on two stools: to provide quick on-site help for the person who decided to ask, and to constitute sort of a knowledge base for people who are coming from Google search.

Although, in my humble opinion, Stack Overflow fails a big one with both goals, the second goal suffers the most. For the arithmetically simple reason: if a single person gets a quick and dirty short-sighted answer that solves X problem instead of Y, it's bad. When 100000 people are shown the same answer, it's 100000x worse.

Almost every time I look for an answer to some question, I get literally appalled by what I find. Most of the time the answer is full of absolutely irrelevant details, dwells on some insignificant topics and - quite often - offers not a standard general purpose solution but some trick that could be possibly used with caution in some rare case but by no means should be the first default action taken.

For the especially bad answers there is always a congregation of critical comments below it, many of which get some hundreds of upvotes. But for some reason nobody dares to touch the answer itself. For as long as ten years or more.

Now look at this post through the eyes of a newbie who barely understands the code they wrote, the problem they faced and the answer found, while basically looking for a piece of code to copy-paste. Would they notice these comments or comprehend them? I doubt it. Does a bad answer accompanied by a critical comment constitute a reliable piece of information? Absolutely not. Does such an answer do more harm than good? Highly likely.

So why don't we care for such answers? Why don't we care for the information found on Stack Overflow? Why is the original poster considered some sacred person who is entitled to have the same answer intact even after leaving Stack Overflow ten years ago? Why do we consider the original answer a taboo that cannot be touched? Why don't we look at the answer through the eyes of a person who has a generic problem and needs a generic solution, focused on this generic problem and not on some irrelevant details? Why don't we, as a community, feel responsible for the information provided here?

A distinct question - why do we resort to some palliative suggestions, such as "downvote and move on", "write a correct answer and move on", "mind your own business and move on"? Definitely, none of them work, but nonetheless it is suggested all the time. Why? What good do we get this way? I suppose that Wikipedia is considered a much more reliable source than Stack Overflow. And would it have been so if Wikipedia was contributed to according to the same principles, "write another article and move on"?

I'm trying not to just rant; those are genuine questions I would like to know the answer to. Personally, I very often land on Stack Overflow when looking for the programming questions. And I genuinely don't understand why there are so many short-sighted, outdated or plainly wrong answers that nevertheless by some whim of the search engine appears at the top and nobody cares to fix them. I myself only recently started doing so, and now I am wondering why I weren't doing it before.

And, I hesitate to ask, but still: what can we do to turn the tide? To make professionals not only answer new questions that will be visited by two dozen people, but also take care of the popular posts that are visited by thousands?

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    Almost every time I look for an answer to some question, I get literally appalled by what I find. That has not been my experience when seeking a quick answer to a question. Maybe it's not uniformly distributed among languages/tech here. An example of an appalling answer would make this a lot more meaningful.
    – Mark
    Mar 13 at 18:48
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    "And I genuinely don't understand why there is so many short-sighted, outdated or plainly wrong answers that nevertheless by some whim of the search engine appears at the top and nobody cares to fix them." ... well, what do you get when you answer questions and what do you get when you just fix old/incorrect answers? Exactly and that's one of the core issues, matching your gamification argument. Another issue is that there are too many posts to handle and to few who actually do something. This is a task you'll never complete.
    – Tom
    Mar 13 at 18:50
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    I'm hopeful that trending sort, if it works and can be applied by default, will be a significant step in the right direction along slightly similar lines to what you're describing, so that downvotes have a real effect, and new, better answers will start surfacing above old (and not-too-uncommonly bad) answers. Answers acquiring more votes (and therefore attention) than others simply because they're the oldest and have been acquiring them for years already has been a significant problem, but it may be a thing of the past soon. Mar 13 at 18:56
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    You are not the only person frustrated because of this. What can we do? Currently not much except downvoting and leaving comments. I hope that with the "Outdated answers" project we will also get additional mechanism that will allow us to visibly mark dangerous or wrong answers and hopefully prevent beginners from using them. Mar 13 at 20:02
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    @CertainPerformance I am not sure that Trending sort will help much. Already upvoted bad answers will continue to receive more upvotes by inexperienced users and those will have more weight than few downvotes made by experts a long time ago. Mar 13 at 20:05
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    Downvotes do work, just not enough people use them; especially on answers. Upvotes on historically (bad) answers are a problem that (as mentioned) the new sorting algorithm will hopefully address.
    – Larnu
    Mar 13 at 20:09
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    "to provide quick on-site help for the person who decided to ask" Nope.
    – philipxy
    Mar 14 at 3:20
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    But for some reason nobody dares to touch the answer itself - there is very little incentive for doing so - you don't get any recognition for your improvements, and you risk all your hard work polishing that turd reverted with a single click of "rollback" or "conflicts with authors intent" flag - so you post a much better answer that will never be seen at the bottom of page 4 because it's stuck amid a bunch of inane "me too" plagiarisms of other possibly terrible answers. What to do? How do we overcome the weight of 1K upvotes on an answer recommending some obsolete JSON deserializer?Trends?
    – Caius Jard
    Mar 14 at 10:47
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    Yes, the whole system needs reform. It was very very well designed, but not, e.g., for the Eternal September two years later. But neither the company nor the meta crowd is interested in it (though the company has taken some small steps recently). It will take another company or another organisation to do it. Mar 14 at 13:02
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    I'm not sure I agree with the close reason here (and certainly not the delete votes). While the question is a bit ranty, it expresses the frustration of a user, and does so in a manner that allows for a productive discussion. I've edited the question slightly, and voted to reopen. The question could still be improved of course, and it certainly isn't unsalvageable.
    – cigien
    Mar 14 at 14:21
  • "if a single person gets a quick and dirty short-sighted answer that solves X problem instead of Y, it's bad" I'm sorry, I don't follow; why is this bad? Why should some solve Y instead of X? Are you talking about people who post questions falling prey to the "XY Problem"? Or something else?
    – TylerH
    Mar 14 at 14:27
  • It's also a little unclear what it is you are asking here. Are you wondering why we don't edit existing answers that were primarily authored by another person? or are you wondering why more users don't vote to delete bad content?
    – TylerH
    Mar 14 at 14:29
  • "what can we do to turn the tide?" Absolutely nothing. Each individual person among the millions of such people have their own reasons for why they may or may not assist in cleaning up the mess that remains. Any singular solution is only going to entice the few people that solution actually reaches. If you come across a post you think needs to be fixed or discussed on meta. do something about it. You can only control you.
    – Kevin B
    Mar 14 at 14:33
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    I don't really share your experience from the perspective of Google, I tend to land on valuable answers (even zero voted late ones). It is only when I look at the new questions feed that I start to lose hope very quickly. not only because of the questions asked but also the answers posted.
    – Gimby
    Mar 15 at 14:02
  • I do share YourCommonSense's experience. I am super disappointed at the droves of bad content that Stack Overflow preserves/retains for the sake of not impacting the right of users to post low-value content. The treatment of this meta question indicates that SO still has too many users that don't care about quality content curation. Here's mine: Link-only RTM answers: A new call to cull them for being unneeded page bloat? Like YCS, I am very frustrated. Even after someone isolates patterns of bad content, nothing is done to combat it. Mar 22 at 7:22

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We do look at answers through the eyes of people coming from Google. There are definitely some people who genuinely care about the existing content and edit, delete, and downvote useless posts. I include myself as one. It's primarily the reason why I am here.

I have encountered this issue numerous times. I search for something that should be simple and have a definite and safe solution. All I can find are poorly formatted examples of code that cause my eyes to bleed. And I generalize here, because I am able to find the right content, but it's often hidden behind a ton of posts that I decide to downvote after 1 second of reading. The problem is worse with certain technologies/tags, but applies to all of Stack Overflow.

In the past, I wasn't able to do anything about it other than cast my measly downvote. With time, I gained access to delete votes and a PHP hammer. This allowed me to clean up many of the Google searches I performed. Some of them would take weeks and a lot of help from SOCVR. I can admit I took part in a deletion of a few thousand posts. Moderators were also helpful to handle some exceptional cases.


But for some reason nobody dares to touch the answer itself. For as long as ten years or more.

Not true. Some of us dared. But, sometimes it leads to rollback wars or nasty comments from the author. I am not going to keep track of users whose posts I better leave untouched, so instead, I choose carefully which answers to improve. I tried leaving alternative better answers, but the outcome is often disheartening (for example, I provided up-to-date alternative answer only to see it come down to -2). The new decaying votes might help with that, but time will tell.

Stack Overflow fails a big one with both goals, the second goal suffers the most.

This is because the first goal is not the goal at all. Stack Overflow is not meant to be a help desk for people having trouble with their code. It's supposed to be a repository of useful solutions to common problems. It fails at that because a lot of users don't understand it. We can't assist every single person that has a code problem, but we can try to provide solutions that they can find themselves on the internet. The issue here is that the first goal drowns the real goal.

A distinct question - why do we resort to some palliative suggestions, such as "downvote and move on", "write a correct answer and move on", "mind your own business and move on"?

Because... we don't have better ones. As I mentioned in my experience, that was often the only thing I could do. If you have the power to do more, please go ahead and clean up the site. Downvote, close, delete, merge, edit, flag and provide better answers. I know you already do a lot of that, but we need more people to curate existing content.


Regarding bounties: they work, but they are a difficult tool to use. Example. Note how I was able to salvage this question despite the bounty "going to waste". I didn't do it to promote my own answer and get points. I don't need any more reputation points. I answered it to salvage the question and be able to use in future as a good duplicate target.

In conclusion, all I can say is don't be afraid to take bold actions to curate the content, but know when to step away and focus your effort where it matters.

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  • Note that I'm not suggesting the use of bounties to promote your own answer, I'm suggesting the use of bounties to get more traffic to the question, and hopefully a new, up-to-date answer. (I haven't voted on this answer)
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 13 at 21:38
  • @Cerbrus Certainly, but how can you ensure that a good answer will arrive from someone else? In this case, no one else provide a better answer, but if they did I would happily award them the bounty. I appreciate the downvotes and delete votes on the bad answers, more than upvotes on mine. Another good outcome would be if someone edited the existing answer, but that didn't really happen either.
    – Dharman Mod
    Mar 13 at 21:44
  • Yea, we can't. But what other options are there? We can incentivize people to add an answer and that's pretty much it, I think.
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 13 at 21:55

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