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Stack Exchange sites are some of the best knowledge resources available. The Stack Exchange network is built on the premise that good questions (asked with a good process behind them) can get good answers. However, it can be pretty daunting for newcomers to get that process right, and current new user onboarding is less than ideal for getting them to a place where they can start asking quality questions and knowing how to write them.

I know this from my own experience. I once participated in a coding boot camp. I was taught that Stack Overflow was the best online resource to get help with programming questions. Most of my questions were not answered. Why not? Like many new users, I thought Stack Overflow was where anyone could come and get any question answered. One of those questions had well-intentioned comments such as, “I think if you read the docs all of your questions will be answered.” which was accurate but not the help I was looking for.

What we are doing about it

We have seen sites like Worldbuilding, Puzzling, and Code Golf have successfully created their own question-asking sandboxes on their meta sites. Recently, we have been actively thinking if we can create a sandbox-like built-in solution that would allow more experienced users to interact with new users in a space away from the active questions on the main site, get some advice and avoid common question closures. The initial research on an approach of this nature has confirmed our belief that this would be a valuable way to approach the problem of new users being able to ask good questions. We want to ensure that new users ask quality questions when they are introduced to the format of Stack Exchange sites and that they are provided with actionable and concrete guidance in case of an issue.

What do you think?

This is the first in a series of posts that will be exploring:

  1. Some of the issues that exist right now with new user onboarding and introducing the idea of the Staging Ground (this post).
  2. Summaries of the different stages of research that have been conducted, which led to our proposed test for the Staging Ground.
  3. An overview of the workflow of the Staging Ground.
  4. What it means to provide feedback to new question askers.
  5. Details on the Staging Ground MVP test that we are planning, including screenshots and descriptions of workflows.

We will be happy to hear your thoughts and address your questions about the research, and Staging Ground on the future posts dedicated to these topics. We’ll also ask you some specific questions that we’d like to hear from you. The first of these:

What was your experience like when you asked your first question on Stack Overflow or on the Stack Exchange network?

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  • 37
    Why is this on Meta.SO instead of Meta.SE, which is more applicable to the broad audience of the whole network?
    – Mithical
    Mar 7 at 19:08
  • 11
    This staging ground sounds similar to the experiment a few years ago: Stack Overflow Mentorship Research Project – was that part of the initial research?
    – Kevin B
    Mar 7 at 19:08
  • 19
    @Mithical We will be testing exclusively on Stack Overflow to start with. Then depending on how that goes, it will be shared on MSE.
    – SpencerG StaffMod
    Mar 7 at 19:09
  • 15
    @Mithical While we hope that Staging Ground will eventually graduate and be made available to all sites on the network, the main use case (and the highest demand for it) will be on Stack Overflow. Thus, our initial series of posts will be on this site. When we are ready to talking about if/how these new tools can help on sites across the network (and what adaptations might be needed there), those discussions will be on MSE.
    – Yaakov Ellis StaffMod
    Mar 7 at 19:12
  • 18
    Also, we're already struggling enough with first questions and answers as it is. Could we please get more focus on our already broken tools before piling on with even more tools? Mar 7 at 19:18
  • 9
    @ZoestandswithUkraine First answers is not struggling. And First questions is doing remarkably better than it was a few weeks ago. But beyond that, this is not an attempt to pile on more tools. As will hopefully become clear, we are trying to test out what will be a change to the overall onboarding experience for new users on the site - proactively trying to help with that experience (and quality). Versus review queues which are by definition reactive.
    – Yaakov Ellis StaffMod
    Mar 7 at 19:41
  • 8
    "You mean a queue" - no, we are not adding a new queue here. Future posts will introduce more about the way that the Staging Ground will work.
    – Yaakov Ellis StaffMod
    Mar 7 at 19:42
  • 19
    I think any step in the direction of reducing poorly asked questions is a good step. I await to see what this will result in, but I am happy either way to see SE trying to tackle this problem.
    – Dharman Mod
    Mar 7 at 19:46
  • 7
    Fair warning, this block of comments is going to jump in topics because writing hard. "no, we are not adding a new queue here" - not necessarily in the old system. Could be a mod flag-style queue, but if you're not adding any type of queue, then you're probably doing mentoring 2.0, and that did not scale the first time around. Either that or you're essentially reimplementing asking, but without asking and without votes, and without closure, but possibly the option to answer either way, and poof, you have an abuse vector with a huge throughput that mods have to manage, assuming we get tools. Mar 7 at 21:13
  • 10
    TL;DR: I don't see any way this is going to work, unless the existing, huge problems with the moderation systems, that severely drag down efficiency at the scale SO operates on, are worked out first. Mar 7 at 21:14
  • 26
    @ZoestandswithUkraine: Would you be comfortable converting that block of comments to an answer? While recognize that it started in response to the OP's comments, and doesn't answer the final prompt, I also think it would be easier for the rest of us to follow (and, if appropriate, respond to) if it were structured as a separate post, and especially since the OP will almost certainly have further responses. Mar 7 at 21:24
  • 8
    @ZoestandswithUkraine This is a lot of good feedback. Thanks for taking the time to share. I want to acknowledge that some, if not all, have been brought up internally. As I mentioned in the post, we will be doing follow-up posts that share some of our research, design mockups, etc. I think you will find the direction we chose satisfying, if not looking forward to your critique to point out what we may have missed.
    – SpencerG StaffMod
    Mar 7 at 22:12
  • 24
    The problem: The vast majority of the time people shouldn't be asking a Stack Overflow question. At the core, it will have a trivial answer. If not, it will be a duplicate. A good, original question is so awesomely rare that it just isn't funny. I'm 100% behind making people ask better questions, be it through the server badgering them or education in effective problem solving techniques and debugging, because the end result will be fewer questions asked due to self-service. That said, I love the sandboxing idea, but I join others in not believing that it will scale. Mar 7 at 23:31
  • 8
    @ZoestandswithUkraine "I don't see any way this is going to work". Thanks for your comments. But we haven't defined anything about how Staging Ground will work thus far, so I think that your determination here is very speculative and a bit premature. We will be devoting other posts to going over how it will work, and those will be the more appropriate places to have this conversation.
    – Yaakov Ellis StaffMod
    Mar 8 at 6:52
  • 9
    My first question pissed off Jon Skeet
    – Sayse
    Mar 8 at 7:56

54 Answers 54

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I was surprised by the first two responses to my first question. They both indicated they hadn't fully read or comprehended the question. I was asking for a simple shell-based convenience tool for filtering text copied from the clipboard at the Unix shell command prompt, without having to divert through an intermediary file. Both responses said to use a file, even though the question was specifically asking for a technique which did not use that.

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  • 3
    Then maybe the question was unclear?
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 8 at 15:43
  • 4
    It was not. stackoverflow.com/questions/71351092
    – Rizzer
    Mar 8 at 15:44
  • 2
    Not completely convinced the question is actually on-topic here. how to copy&paste cleanly into grep?
    – yivi
    Mar 8 at 15:44
  • 2
    That's a different issue. In hindsight the question would fit in Unix&Linux. The boundaries between stacks is not always clearcut.
    – Rizzer
    Mar 8 at 15:46
  • 10
    The downvote here might be because you're asserting that the user that commented on your question (and is trying to help you) hasn't read the question fully. That assumption can't be verified, and is unconstructive. 2 Minutes is plenty to read this question.
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 8 at 15:48
  • 3
    As you can see, there is often a good reason for the reception that you obtained. Please keep Hanlon's razor close next time, before posting the kind of comment you made here. Mar 8 at 15:58
  • 5
    Yeah, well, this comment chain illustrates the issue perfectly
    – Paul
    Mar 8 at 17:00
  • 2
    @Paul Is it an issue that people are subjected to constructive criticism when they post anything on this platform? Mar 8 at 17:24
  • 1
    The problem is more that the criticism was not constructive,
    – Rizzer
    Mar 8 at 20:15
  • 3
    The criticism here is constructive much more often than not but of course humans can err. So in the end nobody knows for sure who's right and wrong, but the amount of feedback might be a strong hint.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 8 at 22:59
  • 2
    So far all the comments posted here have been constructive. However, that still doesn’t stop certain users saying this comment thread "illustrates the problem perfectly". When in fact, it’s more their comment that illustrates the problem perfectly.
    – user692942
    Mar 9 at 21:06
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My first question was the quintessential "newcomer" question. I was stuck on a tkinter problem, didn't know how to describe what I wanted to do, and created a phrase that I thought described the problem. It's also not even formatted that well. I got comments that, at the time, I perceived to be mean, but eventually got an answer that helped me.

It took a while before I asked my next question, but the more I participated on the site and learned how to properly debug programs, I realized why my first question wasn't well received.

There wasn't a good description of what the desired behavior was, nothing showing what was actually wrong, no real MCVE, and jargon that I thought was correct but wasn't.

I've come a long way since then, and I can quickly find answers to most problems that I encounter. The few corner cases I hit where I have to ask, I know how to write much better questions.

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I'm fairly new to Stack Overflow and have only asked two questions overall. As I had already been contributing to the website, I thought I knew how to ask a question (especially one in the same tags I usually answer questions in).

So I did the necessary: did my fair share of googling, was straight to the point, added code, data sample, desired output, explained the issue completely and precisely. I basically wrote my questions the way I'd want to see them asked when I'm the one answering.

The first question got two downvotes and two upvotes, and got some quality answers. The second question got four downvotes and was closed, because "it needs to be more focused and has to be updated to focus on one problem only" (it was straightforward and definitely focused on only one problem).

I'm very open to criticism, but the most frustrating (and infuriating) thing was getting downvotes and my question closed without any indication as to how I could improve it or what was so wrong with it.

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  • 1
    But "needs to be more focused on one problem only" is some kind of indication of how to improve it and what is wrong with it. I haven't looked at this question in particular, but couldn't it simply be a disagreement between you and the 4 people who seems to not have liked it.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 15 at 13:07
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I don't remember my very first question, but asking questions is generally unpleasant and I almost never use the site to ask questions unless I'm answering it too. (I do ask sometimes if I think I have a good question). It is a very good place to document answers however.

I think what is missed by many about question asking is that the question asker is necessarily asking their question from a position of ignorance. The whole point is that I am missing something and I don't know what I'm missing. If I knew what it was, I wouldn't ask. This means there is a strong chance that the question is "off" in some way, but it can't be helped because I am working with a blind spot on that particular concept. Question askers are often criticized (it seems) for this ignorance, when it is a necessary part of question asking. (This is why very often the best apparent quality of question comes from people who already know the answer, because they can ask it without the blind spot.)

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  • 4
    It's not the ignorance, but the lack of effort. In this day and age, not googling something is unacceptable, and that's often what it takes. There's plenty of well-received questions born of ignorance.
    – Passer By
    Mar 17 at 19:41
3

I asked my first question 11 years ago. I was still a student at the time, and my Ruby web application was not parsing data in the way that the documentation indicated it should. I wanted to understand why, but people just gave me code and said "do it this way instead.". It wasn't my goal to "get it working" -- that was the easy part; I came here to figure out why my code didn't work when the documentation indicated that it should. I'm still miffed, because I still don't understand why it didn't work as written.

Since then I've stuck around and answered questions, making sure that I always explain why the original attempt doesn't work, in addition to providing a solution. I'm giving other people the sort of answer I wish I had gotten to my own first question.

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I asked my first question a year ago after a decade of benefiting from reading other questions. Overall, it was not as painful as I anticipated. The first few hours were daunting, waiting to see if I would get down-voted or have my question marked as a duplicate (I was confident it was not).

The question was about a source control issue caused partly by my own misunderstanding but I was pleased to see that the answers were helpful and not dismissive in any way, as I half-expected them to be. It appears that the community is constantly improving, both from the top down and the bottom up.

I haven't asked a second question yet as I've found other answers on SO or results on Google already address what I'm looking for.

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  • 3
    I like this answer (and your attitude) overall, but I have to admit I'm bothered by the notion that it would be "daunting" to countenance receiving a downvote. It just means someone on the Internet thought your question was unclear or not useful. In other words, someone disagreed with you. Big deal. Not anything to get excited about. Certainly not something that should be daunting or fill anyone with dread.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 16 at 4:40
  • Thanks @CodyGray I think it's more a personal thing... I'd had a bad experience on a hardware forum years ago when asking for help so that may have played into my expectations. Mar 16 at 22:11
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I remember asking early on what < > meant in Java. Someone commented something about me needing to read a basic Java book. Another user, though, kindly came to my defense and said that it would be hard to search for those characters. I did get an answer but it was painful. Every downvote in those early days was like a knife stab. Nowadays I don't care much about downvotes, but it was really a bad experience back then. I got question banned, so I opened a new account (this one) because I still needed answers.

These were some some things that helped me to learn how to ask better questions:

  • Reminders to show my research (with links) and describe what I've tried
  • Reduce the problem down to a simpler version (MCVE)
  • Reading topics on SO meta

One benefit of having a bad experience myself, though, was that it gave me more empathy for new users.

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  • 3
    But did you ever read a basic Java book? /ducks
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 16 at 9:12
  • @CodyGray, Haha, I should have taken that advice, but I don't think I ever did. It was easier to be lazy and get people on SO to answer questions for me. I was your typical new question asker.
    – Suragch
    Mar 16 at 9:16
  • @CodyGray, By the way, I want to say that I've been impressed with how well you've done at being moderator and tempering difficult conversations. Thank you for your service.
    – Suragch
    Mar 16 at 9:23
  • Thank you for appreciating my sense of humour :-)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 16 at 9:28
  • 1
    RTFM is never ever acceptable. They utterly failed to find the duplicate among the 1,834,171 Java questions (out of 22,361,395 questions total). Mar 16 at 13:25
  • 3
    Absolutely agreed with @PeterMortensen. At some point, the impression developed among certain "veteran" SO users that we don't allow simple/basic questions, or any question whose answer can be found in the documentation/specification/manual/book/etc. That is completely wrong. Our mission is clearly stated in the tour: "With your help, we're working together to build a library of detailed, high-quality answers to every question about programming." Obviously, if it's a dupe of an existing question, it should be closed (and we'd prefer you not re-ask it), but simple questions are fine.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 18 at 5:09
3

The first question posted on my account was probably the third or fourth question I've written on Stack Overflow. Multiple times, I have started writing a question, and halfway through explaining the problem in the post, I will realize what I've done wrong and cancel the post.

The first question I did end up posting was some extremely niche and strange question that I couldn't find any discussion about on this site or elsewhere. My question got a few comments from people offering advice without being able to fully answer the question.

Its not a good question but not a bad question either. I had been using Stack Overflow as a learning tool for many months prior to posting, so I knew how to format my question to fit the standards of the site.

My first-time-asker experience was improved by:

  1. Researching before posting any question.
  2. Having some experience with the site prior to posting.
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  • This was my experience. Good niche questions don't garner nearly as much reputation as basic questions. Over the years, I've asked (and answered) lots of questions, and some of my better work remains hidden in the corners of StackOverflow. But that's just how the system works. I've learned more and more to try to forget about the point system and focus on asking and answering questions. At this point, I have more reputation than I need for the level of engagement I desire anyway. Mar 18 at 12:35
  • See also Mar 18 at 12:37
2

The first two questions I asked were not on this current account.

  • It was before 2010 and honestly at the time I was thinking "I'm just going to try this site out". Back then I made throwaway email accounts for sites I wasn't familiar with.
  • I don't remember the names of the accounts either unfortunately.

I'm going off memory but, I think my first two questions were:

  • A C (or C++?) question, not a particularly good one, my code had Undefined Behavior that I did not notice.
  • Some question about Visual Studio, not a very good question again. I think I tried to install it on Windows 7 SP1 but I just had vanilla Windows 7. I guess I assumed that the SP1 requirement was just a suggestion or something and I ignored it.

After that I lurked for several years. SE continued to show up in my search results. For quite a while I would have liked to post comments to questions/answers that were missing information or had mistakes but anonymous users can't do that.

I lurked on meta too, to try and get a feel for what sort of content was appropriate, I eventually found this page: https://meta.stackoverflow.com/revisions/261593/1 . I saw that and said "OK, if I post a question, it better be something that I can't even find the slightest trace of an answer anywhere on the internet for."

Several years later, well, I thought I found it: Why does the behavior of overloaded member functions differ from the behavior of non-member functions

  • It was not super clear to me at the time but overloaded methods use static type resolution, not the dynamic type resolution that calling a method on an object uses.
  • There actually was a question that answered this, but it was C#, not VB.NET Polymorphism and overloading with static methods in C#. It seems silly now, but yes, I could read IL, VB.NET, and assembly, but I had trouble reading C# code at the time.

These days, I can find answers to 99% of things on my own, the remaining 1% is stuff like:

  • Esoteric, "10 search results on Google" kind of topics
  • Paid libraries that nobody on SO uses
  • Extremely localized (specific to one machine, one configuration, etc.)
  • Problems that can't be consistently reproduced
  • Bugs in libraries/frameworks with no fixes or workarounds
  • Quirks in libraries that not even the creator knows
  • Ancient Windows secrets probably even Microsoft employees don't know
    • I like ancient Windows secrets though... what if I want to be the Indiana Jones of Windows?
  • Hardware quirks that require you to be an Nvidia/Intel/etc. employee
  • "Why does X do Y" kind of questions that I find interesting but have mixed results on SE
  • Questions that require deep knowledge of complicated subjects (e.g., Linux sound programming)
  • Deep questions about less used / unpopular / "uncool" programming languages (like VB.NET), it seems like only languages like C# get thoroughly dissected.

If I run into something like that, I might try books, reading source code (if available), decompiling, "hacking", experiments, finding a project forum, etc., but if it's not something extremely important I just work around it.

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  • 1
    I have no idea how to interpret a downvote on this. -1 for not remembering something from 12 years ago?
    – jrh
    Mar 16 at 18:39
  • 2
    I think the mistake is trying to interpret a downvote
    – Kevin B
    Mar 16 at 18:40
  • @KevinB probably, still kinda curious though
    – jrh
    Mar 16 at 18:41
  • From the tooltip: "This answer is not useful". Implies that someone thinks your answer is unclear, irrelevant, contributes nothing interesting or unique to the discussion, and/or thinks it is wrong. Kinda goes for all downvotes on all answers.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 18 at 5:06
  • @CodyGray Right. Unclear: with no comment I have no idea what might be unclear. Irrelevant/wrong/not unique: this is a direct answer to the question posed, asking for a unique experience, and I was there. Not interesting: not sure what else somebody would expect after clicking on a question like this, should I add some fireworks gifs or something to make it more interesting? Less charitably, I can guess that maybe it's "-1 because this experience isn't mine / isn't what I hoped it would be" which... I guess is valid, but a little weird? Why come here other than to read other experiences?
    – jrh
    Mar 18 at 16:41
2

I had done a fair bit of lurking and answering on SO before asking my first (and only) question. I had been around long enough to know to put in the effort at bringing things down to an MRE, make an effort to solve the problem myself (that includes checking for duplicates), and explain my issue clearly.

The end result of my efforts was a very forgettable experience - at the time of this writing, I have received one upvote, and an answer in the comments that was turned into an actual answer that I accepted, and has received one upvote (mine). Neither my question nor the answer to it received much attention, but I didn't really care; I had been stumped by a weird edge case Rust's type system, and somebody found a suitable workaround within a few hours.

To sum things up, I came prepared, asked a question, and got an answer. No more, no less.

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  • 1
    But that's more or less as it should be. You asked something that nobody has ever asked before (so likely it is very special). You got help. Others with the same problem may get help too in the future. What more could one wish for?
    – Trilarion
    Mar 10 at 11:45
  • 1
    @Trilarion I am well aware that a timely and correct answer is the best thing I should hope for, but a tiny part of me wishes that my question received more attention, and the upvotes that comes with it, as unlikely as it is for a fairly niche question like this one.
    – Aiden4
    Mar 10 at 16:31
2

I have been using Stack Exchange network for over three years now, and my asking experience was horrible as I didn’t know how to or what/when should I ask.

As a marketer that suddenly shifted his career in 2019 as I really love coding, I must say this site helped a lot, not to mention I had zero knowledge/background of coding.

And here are some of the reasons why my asking experience was horrible.

  1. I had 0 knowledge/background of what I’m asking so obvious things for you is what I’m looking for. Refusing to help or acting smart because I didn’t know how/what/when to ask was a great discouragement.
  2. Programming languages are evolving so fast I remember buying a set of courses online and all of them were outdated. Most of the code was deprecated or very dangerous to use, so, when I ask about something deprecated or an error or style and get duplicates question, but still this code or concept is no longer in use, that was frustrating.
  3. This is a community which means it will have different types of people, different knowledge levels, different backgrounds and different IQ levels. I know that some are very misusing this site and they just want someone to do their homework or acting stupid so you do their code, but generalize it, it is very hurting the community and very discouraging for people who are really looking for knowledge. I, myself, sometimes all I want is a keyword that I'm missing or an example or a reference that has an explanation.
  4. Searching for an answer sometimes was a bit hard and sometimes extremely hard as I didn’t know that exact keyword I was looking for.

I guess these were my biggest problems using the Stack Exchange network. I'm not trying to be negative. I deactivated my account like less than two weeks ago and when I found posts on meta talking about doing positive changes, I immediately reactivated my account, waiting for the beta test and I really hope it can help. I love Stack Exchange and will never forget how much it helped me when I really needed help and didn't know where to find it.

Here are some of the suggestions I really hope to see in the future. I'm not sure if it is feasible or on topic, but I hope it can help.

  1. Adding tags to answer I guess will help people search for answer and ask less. For example, if I'm asking about something in PHP, so I'm going to use the PHP tag, because most likely I don't know what topic or keywords or reference that suits perfect for my question, but the one who is going to answer it has the ability to define the question more. For example, this problem is in PHP 1~5 in select and its name reference is foo.
  2. If number one is feasible, I guess adding a flag on the question that this code is deprecated since PHP 5 and have been replaced to and attach the new answer to it would make people less in need to ask questions as they already have the correct reference, the correct tag and the updated answer that suits PHP 5~8
  3. if 1 and 2 are feasible and someone asks a new question about an already well formatted answered question, add a button to accept this duplication. And instead of closing the question, you can move it to an archive where only some a few have access too. The duplicated question can be used to only enhance the search system. For example, the title and tags used in the duplicated is now tags or similar ways to ask this question under the chosen perfect answer well formatted question.
  4. Add points for people finding the desired answer by searching. Points for good duplicates. Good reinforcement is a good way to encourage behavior to reoccur and negative reinforcement such as downvotes or closed without good explanation is very discouraging

Now you don't have the need to edit every question as someone like me doesn’t know how to well format his English to be acceptable. You have to encourage people to search. And most importantly, you are going to have a good first time question asked experience with your new wizard

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    It is treated differently. Questions marked as duplicate are not as easily removed by the system. They serve as signposts leading to better answers.
    – Dharman Mod
    Mar 9 at 14:18
  • 2
    @TaaLee Hi. Welcome back. You don't need to explain in deep, I believe everyone understand what you mean. An account deactivation after a failure to post a good question can be percieved as a "rage quit" (in gaming). I don't mean it's the case, I mean, you're on the internet where people have the right to interpret your behavior the way they want : don't bother. What you should do : Think a moment about your feelings, what motivated your decision to never ask a question again, for real, and share that honest feeling, it's not because noone provided you direction, what is the real reason ? Mar 9 at 18:59
  • 2
    @TaaLee That means you lack experience in being on point. Don't worry, most people are like that including me. That also tells asking a question requires a lot of effort : taking the time to observe how other good questions are asked, taking the time to be in the shoes of someone reading your question to find out what he/she may not understand about the issue you're encoutering, and providing the means to help them reproduce the same issue. That also means you must find a way to compress the code to a reasonable length, and last, requires you to read books and sites to have the right keywords. Mar 9 at 19:12
  • 2
    @TaaLee Here is my actual example of feeling, on my first question : I was upset because I got so many downvotes and harsh comments, while doing everything I could to meet SO requirements before publishing the question, I wasn't prepared to arm myself with a hard stone mental. While I still believe the way some people welcome new posters is borderline, I learned since SO is not the Q&A resource I thought it was : you can't get here an answer to something too complex (lengthy code and design details), or as simple as a definition, or an evaluation of good/bad design (there are other off topic). Mar 9 at 19:19
  • 2
    @TaaLee One of the main reasons for the lack of feedback on downvotes is humans are petty and revenge votes are, believe it or not, a thing on Stack Overflow. Leaving a comment creates an "impression" that you may have been the user that downvoted the question or answer leaving you open to abuse.
    – user692942
    Mar 9 at 19:24
  • 1
    @TaaLee You are right, many people just silently downvote, and that's the #1 reason why newcommers leave. BUT, think a moment : you and I are talking here, we have the time (imagine I'm giving you directions to improve your question), but that's not the case of everyone, actually, I won't always have that much time. Imagine someone willing to answer questions, finding one good question among 30 other lacky ones per day. It is expected someone, at some point, will burnout, and downvote in a row without any further direction, and unfortunately, you or the next new contributor get that downvote. Mar 9 at 19:31
  • 2
    @TaaLee What I mean is : you can't educate hundreds of thousand of people, it is much efficient to adapt, ignore being slapped, and be better. Changing the downvote system won't solve the problem. A more realistic change would be to inform new members that it takes time to have the right reflexes, and a warm welcome; it is expected the first dozen questions would get negative votes...... a pity, but at some point, I don't want SO to become an MSDN forum where everything gets so hard to find, that side of efficiency explains the strong rules defined here. :) Mar 9 at 19:36
  • 1
    @TaaLee What your asking for is a change to human nature, unfortunately, that won't happen. Sometimes swallowing your pride and taking on board direction when it is given is the clear path to success. This site at the end of the day is a resource for "programmers" if you aren't a programmer don't be deterred but also on the flip side don't expect that you won't receive course correction from time to time. If you can't cope with that then I'd say Stack Overflow isn't for you.
    – user692942
    Mar 9 at 19:36
  • 1
    @TaaLee Most people don't have the time to answer, but many take the time regardless. We all live in a busy world, which I'm afraid is no excuse.
    – user692942
    Mar 9 at 19:39
  • 1
    @KarlStephen i understand a perfect system is hard to achieve but its good to know that everyone on both sided are trying. that why i never gave up trying and id take any chance to improve my skills and improve the quality of my question or my coding
    – Taa Lee
    Mar 9 at 19:43
  • 2
    @user692942 and i appreciate any help and I hope ill be able to serve the community as you "anyone who answer question or take time to help others"do
    – Taa Lee
    Mar 9 at 19:46
  • 1
    @TaaLee The problem with such "experience queue" systems is that there is no automated way to rate content. In order to decide whether a question is fit for experts you need experts to take a look. In order to give feedback how to make questions fit for experts you need experts to take a look. And it won't help people who get their content ratet as "not good enough for experts" to feel less rejected. Ultimately, the downvotes and closevotes that so many people are complaining about is the manual version of such a system. Mar 10 at 8:53
  • 2
    "my asking experience was horrible as I didn’t know how to or what/when should I ask" That's also an important point. People should read much more than ask (books, tutorials, etc.) to get a basic understanding. SO is not good for learning from the ground up. Maybe we should tell that to new askers more often, like as soon as somebody inserts the Python tag recommend some basic online resources about Python. If people then visit these resources they would be more likely to ask a better question afterwards.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 10 at 11:34
  • 1
    @Trilarion very on point i encourage the idea that people should do enough research of the problem they are having before asking. But from experience when i shifted from marketing to coding in general “2019”everybody recommended to start with python as at this time the demand on python was very high for cybersecurity. I remember i have failed miserably to learn as there was not enough applications “exercises/examples” to make me better understand how it work or used. At this time I decided to start with frontend hoping that when i fully understand it ill be able to go for backend
    – Taa Lee
    Mar 10 at 12:14
  • 4
    @TaaLee You don't have time to read a book about a subject and are afraid to not keep up with the pace? May be, but then SO isn't a miracle either. I would even say that you can learn faster from books or tutorials than from asking on SO. Asking on SO is only good to fill in the gaps. For all other things it's search and read and search and read. Summary: SO is a terrible teacher.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 10 at 12:56
2

My first question I was asking for help generating a random number within a range with a weighted distribution.

It was closed because it was deemed a duplicate of a question where there was a random selection from a weighted list of objects.

There was no recourse here for me to clarify that the solution deemed a duplicate would require me to populate a list with hundreds of constructed objects each with an individual weight when really I just want a number between 1 and 100 with a greater likelihood around 30. The question was ultimately closed and I was penalized for asking what I still think was a perfectly valid question.

Ultimately there are a few benefits I think could be done.

  1. I think there should be better flow in these questions so that if they are duplicates there is an avenue for the question asker to fix them up to be more appropriate or to clarify points as to why other posts do not solve the problem.

  2. Punishment sucks. It makes people feel shitty to have a question shot down and points deducted.

  3. Point requirements are needed to properly participate in SO. Largely I made an account because I wanted to upvote comments that were helping me on those issues I have spent hours on. But also commenting to add more detail on workarounds and such were also valuable. Entry requirements to this should not be so difficult.

6
  • 3
    Out of interest, are you aware that you can edit your question to make it clear the duplicate does not apply? Duplicates can be reopened, but it seems this is not communicated clearly enough. Mar 13 at 6:31
  • 4
    I see an edit, but then what it says when your question is closed is telling me to ask a whole new question "Your post has been associated with a similar question. If this question doesn’t resolve your question, ask a new one." . If I were to edit i guess its just not clear how I am supposed to address that it is not a duplicate, can other users see that it has votes marking it as a duplicate? or do I need to explain the whole situation at the end of my post with a link to the supposed duplicate?
    – F Dev
    Mar 13 at 6:37
  • 3
    Thanks for explaining how the information comes across. Indeed I can understand how it does not help you take the actions needed. Mar 13 at 7:18
  • 2
    FWIW, yes, people who can vote to reopen do see that it was closed as a duplicate and by whom. Often enough it is sufficient to reformat a question so as to make the differences more prominent or removing similarities, though for edge cases it can be necessary to directly reference the "duplicate" and point out what is the difference. Mar 13 at 7:23
  • Ah ok I will keep that in mind if it happens again thanks.
    – F Dev
    Mar 13 at 11:36
  • "I still think was a perfectly valid question" And it may well be. Mistakes happen. We used to have a five votes requirement for question closure but reduced it to be more efficient in closing stuff that really should be closed but at the cost of a larger error rate. Question that are valid can be closed by mistake. Please do not take it personally. It can just happen.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 15 at 13:11
2

Back in the day, I didn't dare to ask a question until I had lurked for quite a while and answered a few questions. It was 7 months from the time I answered my first question to the time I asked my first question; by then, I had answered roughly 20 questions.

Moreover, my first question was so good that today it has 28 upvotes (and two downvotes), and it inspired a now extremely well-known programmer / blogger to respond by creating a powerful new interface object.

And that is how I think it should be.

The bar to entry for asking questions should be very high. You should have a certain amount of rep before you can ask a question at all; you should have had to prove your value to the site and your ability to obey the rules. And asking a bad question, for an early user, should generate a significant period of silence, i.e. inability to ask another question.

Stack Overflow has gone exactly the wrong way on this. The day question upvotes changed from meaning 2 points of rep, matching the meaning of downvotes, to 10 points of rep, is one of the worst days in the whole life of Stack Overflow — because it takes a lot of downvotes to give the bad questioner the right message, especially in view of the fact that there is always someone who will indiscriminately come along and upvote a question, thus sending a bad questioner a very wrong message. It now takes all the running we can do to stay in one place, trying desperately to keep the crap off the site, and losing more ground every moment. Be as friendly as you like, but the bar to entry needs to be higher, not lower.

5
  • Well said, @matt. Re: "The bar to entry for asking questions should be very high. You should have a certain amount of rep before you can ask a question at all; you should have had to prove your value to the site and your ability to obey the rules." I couldn't agree more. Mar 15 at 12:13
  • "I didn't dare to ask a question until I had lurked for quite a while and answered a few questions." Back then, when there were still so many interesting unanswered questions. But nowadays, where shall these interesting not yet answered questions come from? It seems we probably run out of askers (of good questions) before we run out of answerers.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 15 at 13:05
  • 2
    @Trilarion If users would search before asking, most of them would not need to ask any question at all. People are so self-centered, they imagine they are the only ones ever to encounter an issue, or that they deserve special hand holding. Instead of treating SO as an encyclopedia, they try to turn it into a code writing service.
    – matt
    Mar 15 at 13:12
  • 2
    It would be an interesting experiment if we publically required all questions to sit around for a week in a non-published form (in an editable for so you can add research), and the asker to come back and explicitly make them public. It seems like that would discorage an awful lot of homework dumps and other low effort questions. Mar 15 at 20:05
  • @user1937198 You know, I think there's a somewhat palatable way to do the experiment. Create a privileged queue of questions with delayed publishing, let the usual questions go on and we can see what we get there.
    – Passer By
    Mar 17 at 19:23
2

My first Question experience was good, it got upvoted a few years later. The reason is because I had read many questions before, checked out how the site worked and had seen people getting roasted for:

  • not including code,

  • errors as images,

  • no actual question,

  • poor format/grammar,

  • in a foreign language,

  • all to common Plz Show Mez Teh Codez and do my job/homework/assignment,

  • or the famous one line "how do I make an chat xyz" tagging 5 different languages.

A tour showing examples of questions getting roasted in the above ways would be the next step IMHO before engaging a staging ground. This maps back to my comment here https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/381759/495455 in the thread The Ask Question Wizard is Live!

ps Disappointing to see User:slakx the first person to help me is no longer contributing.

I wanted to also quickly touch on answering for newbies. The beginning of my answer history isn't great and you might wonder why I didn't give up. It was so hard to even get 50pts rep to comment! I was awarded an Unsung Hero due to the lack of recognition, that's how high the bar was raised! If I didn't have prior experience working in 3rd/4th tier "coding & database" support I would have given up. So if I see a newbie provide a half decent answer, I upvote them to help get them to the 50rep privilege point.

8
  • 3
    Upvoting the "user" is generally frowned upon, because this implies that downvoting is also towards the "user".
    – Stephen Rauch Mod
    Mar 15 at 3:00
  • 1
    @StephenRauch are you replying to the right answer? We are talking about people here, I didn't once use the word user. The problem is that for almost 15 yrs newbies (and old schoolers like stackx, Jon Galloway, etc) have had bad experiences. I'm suggesting a few examples to accompany the Question Wizard. Mar 15 at 3:06
  • 3
    I upvote them to help <-
    – Stephen Rauch Mod
    Mar 15 at 3:08
  • 3
    This is the second time you've tried to twist my words. So if I see a newbie provide a half decent answer, I upvote them to help get them to the 50rep privilege point. I clearly say upvote them because it was half decent. You can check out my 11yrs of voting history, 80% up, 20% down, 50/50 on Q vs A's. It's disenchanting for you to insinuate that upvoting is bad (or is someway unhelpful) or that I do it discriminatorily. End of conversation. Mar 15 at 3:14
  • 1
    End of Conversation. Didn't view this is as much of a conversation, but sorry I twisted your use of the word them to mean "user". I guess the pronoun "they" referred to "half decent answer".
    – Stephen Rauch Mod
    Mar 15 at 3:26
  • 3
    Could you please edit to clarify what the "them" in "I upvote them to help" to help means? Because I read it the same as @StephenRauch. When upvoting the answer, I would have expected "I upvote it to help". Mar 15 at 6:35
  • 1
    Ahem, folks, I think we got a little bit too hang up on the wording - it's pretty clear the OP did not mean the user (although the usage of "them" is, indeed, a bit unorthodox, so I see how it could be misread) Mar 15 at 16:38
  • 1
    I mean, it was pretty clear the upvote is targeted on the post, but it's being done to give the user rep as stated in the answer, so both are correct, and one could certainly argue that's clearly a case of upvoting for reasons other than quality/usefulness. I read it as, you would use the user's (new user) standing to help you decide to upvote a post that was at minimum decent.
    – Kevin B
    Mar 15 at 16:42
2

My biggest problem with asking questions from the first one years ago to this day is the very vague threshold how minimal of an example is too minimal.

I often can trim my question down to a dozen lines of code, but communities feedback is "we don't understand your use case" where my question is basically "I am missing a keyword somewhere. Help me get this to compile"

If I leave to much info, feedback is often "can you simplify your case" / "question is too broad"

This results in me having to edit my question numerous times, integrating the answers to question arising in the comments and trimming down the fat that confuses the community. All this while my question falls down from new into obscurity.

I think a staging area where users can help pre-improve the questions, by posting what-would-be-a-comment, and having a conversation that is not limited by comments character limit would be of great help.

I don't propose that every question goes through the staging area, but that there is a place for users like me who need the help to get it, instead of having 20+ comments on the question, and polluting the review queue with "Improved question" edits. (Correct me if I'm wrong and self-edits are exempt.)

7
  • 4
    About the staging area: Problem is, this doesn't scale. At the size of SO with 7k questions a day, there are simply too few people who want to invest time into questions that might or might not be answerable at some point.
    – BDL
    Mar 17 at 12:33
  • 2
    Also note, that the more you show that you care about SO and that you are willing to investing effort yourself, the better the responses will be. If the first thing I have to do before answering is to capitalize all I, make sure that every sentence starts with a capital letter and add a few ' (like in don't), then my motivation significantly drops. That's something any author can easily do, even with a very bad level of English. Most of this things are even handled automatically by the browsers spell checking.
    – BDL
    Mar 17 at 12:37
  • @BDL Just something worth noting, having minor typos like this edited on my post and then receiving no answers or even comments was one of my major friction points as a new asker that made me not want to invest any further effort myself. Not trying to get into reasoning and solutions, it's just another small straw on the camel's back of new askers. Mar 17 at 13:30
  • 2
    To clarify, what I mean is "capitalization doesn't help clarify my question, I thought the point of editing was to help the question get answers". So it's confusing, which leads to a feeling that the editor(s) are just being pedantic and not interested in helping, regardless of their actual intention. Mar 17 at 14:35
  • 3
    @Appleguysnake: I usually tend to fix typos and capitalization when I read the post for the first time. At that point I usually don't even know what your asking about, whether it's on-topic or if I know the answer. At best, I save other people some headache when reading the question, at worst I wasted a few minutes. IMHO, the point of editing is to improve the question. Fixing tzpos makes it easier for the next person to read, so (in theory) it should improve your chances of getting an answer
    – BDL
    Mar 17 at 17:04
  • Knowing what's minimal involves a certain level of debugging skill and knowledge. Unless SO teaches debugging to new users, this is kinda hopeless. But I also don't believe a staging area, as a place to teach that, can scale.
    – Passer By
    Mar 17 at 18:51
  • @Valerij Self-edits are exempt from the edit review queue. You don't need someone to approve an edit to your own question! Mar 18 at 12:32
1

I got thousands of comments stating my question was a duplicate (it actually was).

8
  • 10
    Thousands? Are you sure you're not a few orders of magnitude off? :D Either way, were those comments helpful? How did you experience them?
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 8 at 17:21
  • 7
    It was just 3 btw
    – Leo
    Mar 8 at 17:23
  • 5
    Small margin of error :-)
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 8 at 17:24
  • 8
    If a couple thousand means 5000 then I had a 166,567% relative error.
    – Leo
    Mar 8 at 17:25
  • 1
    Three orders of magnitude is nothing in astronomy. Wasn't there some prediction of string theory that was more than 100 orders of magnitude off? Mar 9 at 13:51
  • Ok why are we talking about quantum physics
    – Leo
    Mar 9 at 14:56
  • @Cerbrus Presumably it was "first-time asker experienced" as thousands.
    – philipxy
    Mar 9 at 22:09
  • 2
    Small margin, in the log-scale. Mar 10 at 18:49
1

It was fairly early on in the Android days, and I asked what hardware I should buy to test out and develop with the novel USB host stack on Android with my proprietary devices.

It was closed because it'd be an opinion-based question. This was before Reddit was a big thing and I really didn't know where else to ask. I actually got a fair amount of pity upvotes (and it stayed undeleted up until a few months ago), but I was frustrated that it was closed without really any pointers to where I could ask.

These days, there are plenty of communities I can ask about stuff like this.

1
  • 1
    What are some of those communities? Mar 10 at 15:13
1

I started my question journey in 2014. While not new to SO (I answered a couple of questions before), it was still a bit nerve wrecking to post a question for the first time. I had learned enough about SO to know that the question better be good.

If I remember correctly, the question was closed (I don't remember the close reason). I looked it over, did not agree with the closure and asked for it to be reopened. If memory serves right, it was reopened by a mod and not the reopen queue.

So despite having some SO experience, not a good experience. I remember feeling put off by the fact that the question was closed with an (from my point of view) invalid reasoning. Today, I know/can guess that the people that closed the question likely did not have knowledge in the question's tags and mistook it for sand.

Maybe that information (people with no knowledge of the tags will evaluate the question) should be added in some form to the Staging Ground so new contributors can take it into account?

I guess the biggest eye opener was to see the mechanisms of SO in practical action instead of reading about them in theory. Maybe the help could do a bit more show instead of tell or add some videos illustrating examples of closed/downvoted questions and what to do about them? The question wizard might also benefit from some examples of bad questions with explanation why they are bad and how they could be improved.

2
  • 4
    Did this occur with a different account than the one you are using now? Because your account has never had any questions closed (and you have no deleted questions).
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 13 at 13:17
  • 1
    To be honest, I'm not sure. Details are hazy by now, but I thought it was this account, since I never had any other (or at least can't remember others).
    – FH-Inway
    Mar 13 at 16:37
0

I have only ever asked a couple of questions, although I have been an active user of SO for multiple years. I found it a bit tricky to ask the first question in a way that I thought the community would like, as I have experienced that people can be a bit harsh in their critique of inexperienced users. Based on my own experience, it can be a bit hard to decide to post the first question, as I was afraid of being shut down for either asking a stupid question, asking it in the wrong way, or being told that I should have done more research myself before posting.

0

I found that the first question of most people is not a specific technical detail. On the contrary, they often need a technical implementation idea and specific executable code, but these questions are often asked by people for technical details.

They are newcomers, and if they can clearly know the technical terms corresponding to the technical problems they encounter, why don't they google it?

Even if they have made it very clear that these posts are finally closed, I think it can be replaced by setting up a【newcomer section】for these low-quality, but helpful posts for newcomers.

4
  • 6
    Consider the entire rest of the Web as the "newcomer section", containing "low-quality but helpful posts". That is not what Stack Overflow intends to be, nor is there any lack of places containing low-quality but possibly useful content.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 11 at 6:09
  • 1
    @CodyGray But there is a point here. People with better search skills will ask less. The ones that remain and do ask will probably be biased towards not being able to search that well. Or saying it another way: the average asker may even have below than average skills because of a selection bias.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 11 at 14:25
  • 1
    Re "setting up a【newcomer section】for these low-quality, but helpful posts for newcomers.": No, they ought to be condensed into (real) FAQs. A mechanism for it is lacking; the closest is/was some tag wikis, like the one for C++ (e.g. sections "New to C++?" and "Stack Overflow's C++ FAQ") and PHP (now destroyed). (The length limitation of tag wikis is also sometimes a real problem (32,000 characters?).) Mar 11 at 21:48
  • @PeterMortensen Can you explain what you mean by "now destroyed" in reference to the PHP tag wiki? The length limit is 30k characters, as far as I recall. So, yeah, that's a bit of a limitation if you're trying to create a consolidated FAQ. But I oppose that strategy. On a Q&A site, the FAQs should be... wait for it... asked as questions.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 12 at 4:49
-1

I asked my first question in 2012.

By this time, SO had already gained a reputation for being unfriendly to new users. I took the time to research other questions and search elsewhere and write what I thought was a good question. It was moderately successful -- no downvotes, a couple upvotes, and an amusing comment.

I was probably the exception as a new asker -- one who did what the community hopes a new asker would do. And I was frightened into doing it by an unfriendly community. Did I care about contributing to an encyclopedic Q&A? No. I just wanted my question answered.

I've still asked very few questions. 22 in over 10 years. Why? Because I know that this community has such high ideals for questions that it doesn't tolerate stupidity. As a programmer, I often make mistakes and ask stupid questions. But not here.

1
  • 2
    I really won't say it's stupidity. For most bad questions, it's either plain bad communication, where I really have no idea what might constitute an answer, or absence of effort, e.g. homework dumps.
    – Passer By
    Mar 17 at 18:43
-8

Researched the topic before asking the question, read several other questions on the same problem, none of them helped, despite me following the answers, so I asked my own question, citing the preceding questions and my own research.

About 10 people said my question is a duplicate and gave a link to the very same questions I cited in my own question, explaining how they did not apply to my case.

3 more were unsatisfied how my question wasn't pretty enough, therefore they weren't going to answer it.

~3 posted answers that were just copy-paste of some standard response template (that they did not understand) for my general problem.

All in all approximately 16 people were commenting on my question without reading it, at all.

Then 1 lone soul answered my question and that fixed my problem.

So, just your basic, everyday experience on SO.

9
  • 9
    So... you think this kind of hostility and abuse (calling users "illiterate") is OK, but you were annoyed by the lack of thoroughness of volunteers? Why, exactly, do we owe you so much when you don't even treat us with respect?
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 14 at 22:53
  • 1
    @CodyGray, because I started treating you disrespectfully only after my experiences on SO.
    – Tessaract
    Mar 14 at 22:56
  • 3
    "So, just your basic, everyday experience on SO." That's a rather fitting description for the casual abuse of over a dozen people. As far as I can tell, none of your (undeleted) question are anywhere near this badly received. Why paint such a bleak picture? Mar 15 at 6:44
  • 8
    As with a couple of the other users posting answers here, the account used to post has no questions (deleted or undeleted) that match the descriptions given. The only one of Tessaract's questions that have ever been closed is this one, which is the third most-recent question they've asked, certainly not one of the early ones. So... I don't know what is happening. Either users are operating multiple accounts, or they are misremembering what happened. (cc @MisterMiyagi)
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 15 at 7:44
  • 1
    @CodyGray, yes, the first question I've asked was over 9 years ago, if I remember correctly, and I've lost that account to time. If it was only me it would seem possible to misremember what happened, but seeing other people having similar experiences I'd say we are remembering pretty well. Also, that wasn't an isolated incident, hence the "So, just your basic, everyday experience on SO.". Only after experiencing so much negativity did I start to tailor my questions to really picky people, which demotivates me to ask questions, at all. Hence not a lot of questions on this account.
    – Tessaract
    Mar 15 at 12:42
  • @MisterMiyagi, please see my response to Cody Gray.
    – Tessaract
    Mar 15 at 12:43
  • 2
    "About 10 people said my question is a duplicate" What a waste of valuable time. 2-3 would probably have been enough to establish the fact with sufficient accuracy. Really so much energy is wasted while trying to curate the content.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 15 at 13:02
  • 8
    @Tessaract "but seeing other people having similar experiences I'd say we are remembering pretty well" Sorry, I am not convinced by this. The internet is full of echo chambers for SO bashing and hyperboles. Even SO itself is no exemption – when cleaning up my curation-following list I'm regularly surprised myself that most question interactions aren't as bad as both sides on Meta would make it seem. Despite the "bad" experience you asked 30 Qs in 11 months – I'm at less than 10 Qs in 9 years – so even the assertion that you are demotivated to ask needs to be taken with a grain of salt. Mar 15 at 13:19
  • 1
    Re "my question wasn't pretty enough": In what way? Can you elaborate? They can't possibly literally have said that. Mar 16 at 13:40
-12

What was your experience like when you asked your first question on Stack Overflow or on the Stack Exchange network?

That's very easy to answer. It felt almost exactly like how answering this question feels. I'm an experienced software engineer, not even the dumbest one around (excuse my arrogance) there is a good discussion to have, and I genuinely feel I can contribute to it, and... despite all of this I have absolutely no idea if I will be downvoted into oblivion for:

  • my tone being too informal
  • breaking yet another rule I was not aware of
  • posting supposedly irrelevant anecdotes
  • not taking the discussion seriously enough
  • someone being on a downvote spree (yes, this happens)
  • someone methodically downvoting my questions (even old ones) because I got into an argument with them (or more likely one of their friends) on an unrelated stackexchange site

I think the elephant in the room is this:

https://abstrusegoose.com/590

As it had been explicitly pointed out in the past, with the exact same comic strip, but it was dismissed as 'anecdotal' and as 'just a silly webcomic'.

Let me state it verbally then: gamification, on what idea this whole site is based on, only works until someone comes up with the genius idea that "I can spend the next 30 minutes improving this question and get +25 reputation tops, or... downvoting a hundred questions, making questionable punctuation edits in two dozen other ones, and closing literally any question that involves a tradeoff as 'opinion based'".

It was a good idea in the beginning but - in gaming terms - the meta has shifted. In the current meta for the vast majority of users, it is not a viable reputation- and trophyfarming strategy to spend time on providing genuine help to question askers and then write detailed well thought-out answers, when they can simply mass-edit their way into the ranks of the top half million users, with 1000+ reputation and additional privileges to prevent those pesky 'newbs' from climbing the ranks through asking and answering.

I am not saying any foul play is involved, but the current system does motivate the described behavior, and the whole point of gamification is that such motivators do work, even if just subconsciously.

Ask literally anyone outside of this 'community' they will tell you the same.

By the way, what's the reason again for this being posted here instead of reddit, hackernews, twitter, facebook, etc? Obviously the answers here will be extremely biased.

14
  • 1
    Aaand... just as expected I got my first downvote in 30 seconds for an answer I spent 30 minutes on. Totally worth my time, thanks for the experience.
    – szmate1618
    Mar 11 at 0:34
  • 6
    A downvote on a Meta site such as this one typically means that someone disagrees with you. Votes are not meant as a way of compensating you for your time; they're meant to signal community agreement regarding the content, presentation, usefulness, relevance, etc. of a particular post.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 11 at 1:11
  • 8
    Just in the first few paragraphs of this answer, you off-handedly use a turn of phrase that my experience tells me may be indicative of your negative experience using this site: "[I feel] there is a good discussion to have…". Probably! Likely, even! But Stack Overflow doesn't do discussions; we actively discourage them (at least on the main site; Meta is a bit different). So, if you're here trying to have a discussion, you're likely to experience a great deal of friction, both from the site tooling and also from other members, who are trying to quell discussions in favor of strict Q&A.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 11 at 1:13
  • 5
    Regarding the webcomic, it's obviously hyperbolic (we don't close questions for being stupid), but that's the nature of comics. Otherwise, I think it's quite apt. This is meant as a Q&A site for professional and enthusiast programmers. Often times, the answer to a question asked by a professional (or someone aiming to do professional-quality work) is going to be... use the existing tools. And that's OK! It's the answer I'm looking for 99% of the time. It isn't the only answer that SO permits to be posted—reinventing the wheel is OK. But it's rarely the correct solution for our audience.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 11 at 1:15
  • 1
    "Votes are not meant as a way of compensating you for your time; they're meant to signal community agreement". Have fun in the echochamber then.
    – szmate1618
    Mar 11 at 1:42
  • 13
    Also, unlike in the cartoon, we do not close or downvote users, we close or downvote posts. If the same user came back later and asked an on-topic, well-researched (meaning it was not asked before), well-written, high-quality question, it would be upvoted and not closed. By the way, no one gets rep for closing questions, and only new users get rep for successfully suggesting edits, so I'm not sure what that whole thing is about. Much more likely is a user answering several hundred duplicate questions, with the attendant upvotes those answers receive, if one wants to rep-farm. Mar 11 at 1:50
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    Allowing people to express opinions doesn't make it an echo chamber. It would be an echo chamber if moderators (or anyone else, really) systematically deleted posts that they disagree with, but they don't, and I'm especially sensitive to anything that might even remotely border on that type of censorship. Being able to express unpopular opinions is one of the key features of Meta Stack Overflow. So is, of course, others being able to inform you without confrontation that your opinions are unpopular. This is why the voting system is important.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 11 at 6:11
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    I mean... if you assume bad faith everything comes off as bad faith.
    – Passer By
    Mar 11 at 6:16
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    I don't quite follow the point on gamification, perhaps you can clarify it a bit? Downvoting, editing and closing gets me no reputation at all – in fact one of them costs reputation. Curating even a little has left me far behind the people who answer questions no matter what (I'll leave the "detailed well thought-out" up for debate) in terms of the site's gamification. So perhaps you could explain a bit better how gamification does "motivate the described behavior"? Mar 11 at 7:04
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    "Ask literally anyone outside of this 'community' they will tell you the same." That's a blatant example of a selection bias. The people who tried to ask a question and failed will tend to link Stack Overflow to a negative aura, and report it as such. On the other hand, most mentions of Stack Overflow in social media pose the site as a (very) useful source of knowledge. Mar 11 at 14:36
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    "By the way, what's the reason again for this being posted here instead of reddit, hackernews, twitter, facebook, etc? Obviously the answers here will be extremely biased." Those venues are just as prone to biases, and are not known to foster constructive discussion. It is only natural for the company to prefer their own system designed to discuss about Stack Overflow itself. Mar 11 at 14:39
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    @MisterMiyagi 100% this! It gets disheartening but it's the difference between caring for the quality of the content and answering questions for imaginary internet points. It's clear the OP doesn't realise that curation is more likely to hurt a curators rep then increase it.
    – user692942
    Mar 12 at 17:03
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    @szmate1618 I want you know that your answer is appreciated because it does a great job summarizing the very obvious problems with the site, and is a perfect honey trap for comments demonstrating exactly what you explained. Mar 17 at 14:15
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    @Appleguysnake The comments only describe that there are many reasons for downvoting which are considered reasonable. This is the only part which goes more in line with the answer's concerns. Everything else in the answer, primarily the argument alleging that gamification is the root of the problem in curation, was only counterargued constructively. Mar 17 at 15:14
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My first experience asking a question on Stack Overflow was fine. Which is why I am still here, many years later.

Things are different nowadays. Often, the first questioner's experience is horrible. The site is crawling with users who delight in picking problems and voting to close any question that is not perfect, often within minutes.

I suggest that no question should be closed for a time, say four hours, after being first asked. This would allow time for well intentioned people to drop by and help out the inexperienced askers.

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    Using this space to make suggestions on how to make things better, is only going to result in people voting on this answer in agreement/disagreement with the suggestion
    – Kevin B
    Mar 9 at 19:41
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    Sounds good to me. Anyway, I was answering the question posed in the OP - but I don't like to complain without offering a solution. Mar 9 at 20:11
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    Is the implication of the last sentence intentional? That people who vote are not well intended? Mar 10 at 6:13
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    I get the impression you may misunderstand the purpose of closing questions. In fact, we close questions precisely to give well-intentioned people the opportunity to drop by and help out the inexperienced askers. While the question is closed, answers are blocked, so the question can be freely discussed, edited, reformulated, or even completely rewritten (either by the original poster or by anyone else), without concern of invalidating existing answers. Once the question has been polished into shape (i.e., to meet Stack Overflow's specific requirements), then it can be re-opened and answered.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 10 at 6:53
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    @CodyGray But there are a lot of questions answered before they can get closed and ravenspoint wants to have this chance even increased. With your model of the life cycle that shouldn't happen at all because closed questions are unanswerable by definition and by rules. Don't want to disagree with anyone here, just pointing out the differences in the approaches.
    – Trilarion
    Mar 10 at 12:05
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    Yes, I think closure should happen earlier and more frequently, @Trilarion; thanks for pointing that out. Unfortunately, the site has gotten large enough that it doesn't scale without an excessive amount of effort. I appreciate the work that everyone puts in to reviewing questions.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Mar 11 at 1:17
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    In the same tone, but opposite perspective, the site is crawling with lazy/spam users who ask low-quality/duplicate questions, and don't care to research or help others. Mar 14 at 16:12
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