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In early times of Stack Overflow, people agreed on giving an OP time to do the first edits of their question on their own, especially when someone is new and the question is less than a few minutes old.

Now I see people rushing to edit a question that is just a minute old, while the OP is editing the question on themselves, leading to frustration and breaks.

I suggest to prevent any editing of a question in the first few minutes, to stop the people breaking OPs changes.

As said, in early times of SO we went for education: Tell someone who is new what should be edited, without directly editing the question. This has changed and makes asking a more harsh and unpleasant experience.

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  • 13
    I have no memory of that - I've always seen people editing questions to format code (for example) very soon after the question is asked. Do you remember whether there was discussion of that on Meta?
    – Jon Skeet
    Feb 23 at 11:41
  • 18
    "people agreed on giving an OP time to do the first edits of their question on their own" - Citation needed? Feb 23 at 11:41
  • 21
    The OP has all the time in the world to make changes before posting the question. Adding barriers to users trying to help fixing content does not seem a winning strategy.
    – yivi
    Feb 23 at 11:42
  • 1
    Maybe you are right and there has never been a real agreement. Doesn't make my suggestion less worthy. Editing someones question within a minute of posting is frustration for the person who is asking.
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 11:42
  • 15
    Why? They get a preview, what possible reason could there be for not simply reviewing your post before posting it, you know, like you're supposed to. Feb 23 at 11:43
  • 20
    I've seen quite a few questions with lack of formatting get downvoted early. The OP had no idea how to properly apply formatting, most prominently code formatting. Editing these can save a lot of frustration, I would say. Feb 23 at 11:43
  • Valid point @MisterMiyagi. I feel like there was an episode when there was more patience within the community. Instead of downvoting for bad formatting, we left comments pointing to the "how to format a question" page.
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 11:45
  • 2
    @DanielW. I've got told off one too many times to do that anymore... As far as I can tell, the general help pages are often way too general for people struggling with such things. And going to the lengths of explaining what I would have edited and how to someone struggling with it in the first place... well... there are only so many hours in a day. Feb 23 at 11:48
  • 11
    I seriously don't know where you got this idea that we should wait a few minutes before doing anything to the question. Once it's posted, it better be ready to be scrutinized and curated. Your recent comments in a question on the main site were not constructive, not good advice, and/or borderline rude, which is why they were flagged and removed. Feb 23 at 12:20
  • 13
    “Rude is if a mod deletes my comment just because he/she disagrees with my opinion.” - No; A community moderator doing their job and removing unnecessary commentary isn’t rude. Feb 23 at 12:55
  • 4
    Maybe OP shouldn't be allowed to subject us to their ill-conceived post. I'd rather see their question go into limbo where only they can see it for 5 minutes, giving them a chance to think about what they've done. Questions have a very very limited shelf life on Stack Overflow so if a community member wants to give OP a chance by quickly improving their question usually via general formatting, you wish to stop them?
    – MonkeyZeus
    Feb 23 at 15:19
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    I like a policy to wait 5 min for allow the poster to fix obvious formatting and/or grammar problems in the post (question or answer). This is for avoid concurrent edits, which could be confusing. I agree that the poster would better fix these problems on a preview stage, which provides almost the same post's view. But "almost the same" is not the "the same". Actually, I have edited several my posts during that "grace period" (when editing doesn't create an entry in the post's history). But I don't like the idea to make this "do-not-edit-in-5-min" policy to be forced for everyone.
    – Tsyvarev
    Feb 23 at 17:05
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    This is a real problem (edit stomping). But an alternative solution could be to let the OP edit a private version (or only visible to a select few (TBD)) in its fully rendered form (not just a preview - for example, the syntax highlighting is very different). After any number of iterations (incl. more than 5 minutes), it could then go to the next phase or be published. Perhaps as a prelude or part of a phased approach. There isn't any universal law that says that publication, refinement, acceptance (close votes), and rating (voting) must all happen at (nearly) the same time. Feb 23 at 17:22
  • 3
    There was a time when Stack Overflow was more patient in general, but this was before the site crossed the horizon into the Eternal September. Feb 23 at 18:23
  • 2
    I have to agree with Peter Mortensen's alternative suggestion. Stopping people from editing for 5 minutes is a solution that would have worked in 2010, but not in 2020+ where we are not dealing with Stack Overflow but Stack Cthulhu. I do agree that a two-phase publication is a benefit. When I write company wiki stuff it takes a couple of minutes of re-reading the actual fully rendered document before I realise how lopsided the current structure is and where there are holes in the information. You have to take your mind out of "create" mode and put it into "review" mode.
    – Gimby
    Feb 25 at 14:41

1 Answer 1

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And then someone posts a question containing blatantly rude or otherwise ToS-violating content, that should be edited out ASAP, but we're stuck with it for X minutes.

As a question author should post their question only after they've reviewed it, this suggestion doesn't solve the described problem, and adds a new issue.

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  • I have never seen this thing happen in almost 10 years SO. You know the contents are still there even after they have been edited? Whenever there is something like that, the right way is to flag the question. The problem solved faster that way too.
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 12:33
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    I've seen this plenty of times, and "If an edit can be made that removes the offending portions without otherwise affecting the meaning of the post, then a rude/abusive flag is inappropriate." (source)
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 23 at 12:35
  • 1
    Besides, how is instantly editing a question slower than flagging it and waiting for the flag to be handled?
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 23 at 12:35
  • How is that a prove? "The post was not inherently rude or abusive."
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 12:36
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    The mod-diamond allows the mod to travel back in time, and edit the post before the idea of posting it was ever conceived. Thus, flags are the fastest option, always. /s
    – yivi
    Feb 23 at 12:36
  • You think "am I crazy?" is rude, offensive or ToS violating?
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 12:36
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    I don't think it's "a prove", whatever that may be. I'm just echoing SO policy in this answer, and I'm speaking from plenty of experience when I say questions like that happen. I don't know where you're pulling "am I crazy" from, and I don't see how it relates to my answer.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 23 at 12:42
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    The point of my link is the moderator's answer that explains very clearly: "If an edit can be made that removes the offending portions without otherwise affecting the meaning of the post, then a rude/abusive flag is inappropriate." The specific example there is irrelevant.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 23 at 13:04
  • The rude/abusive flag is inappripriate because "The post was never rude or abusive". Read your own reference properly.
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 13:05
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    So you're just disregarding the first general statement, because of the answer going into detail about that specific case...
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 23 at 13:09
  • I don't agree with what you say and I already gave the reason. If you edit a post of someone violating ToS, you are essentially assisting the person. I never touch a question thats toxic or ToS violating. Always flag, never edit.
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 16:45
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    @DanielW. As per the given link, along with many other examples, expect at least some of those flags to be disputed or declined. Disagreeing with the policies in place and just having it your way is not a wise move. Feb 23 at 17:32
  • @E_net4thecurator Sorry, I don't understand what you are trying to tell me. If the question is ok but it contains an inappropriate phrase, we remove that phrase. If the question is spam, ToS violating, not a real question - we flag the question. This thread is about "edit stomping" which is a real problem.
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 18:01
  • Recently there was a post where someone advertised their product on SO with no programming question at all, 100% spam. What you do is, you edit the question, remove its contents, and then flag the question as spam? Is this how you do it?
    – Daniel W.
    Feb 23 at 18:13
  • @DanielW. No, spam should just be flagged. But that’s comparing apples and oranges. O refer uou back to the quote I quoted twice now.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 23 at 18:26

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