53

I have edited and added explanations to code-only answers, to make them more clear.

Example:

  • I want to merge two list in a single list [duplicate]

  • The above answer is a code-only answer, below is the explanation I have to add:

  • Explantion:

    • It's a list comprehension.
    • Just creating a new list [j,list2[i]] which first adds first index of list1 and then compiles it with the first index of list2 and then the final value is added to the list l, using a for-loop.

Is this OK, or should I ask the answer author to edit and add explanation themselves?

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  • 3
  • 2
    When was the last time you did this? I wanted to see if you could use any specific advice, so I checked your suggested edit history, but didn't see any edits to answers except for relatively minor changes to spelling and such.
    – wjandrea
    Feb 21 at 0:11
  • 52
    It is not scalable to fix the posts, we must find a way to fix the contributors. Feb 21 at 0:41
  • 30
    Don't do this. It can very, very easily go against the OP's original intent.
    – user17242583
    Feb 21 at 1:33
  • 7
    @richardec I disagree. Some cases are clear. A code does one thing, regardless of the OP's intentions. Feb 21 at 9:38
  • 35
    Consider this "code": I have a banana. Now explain whether this is due to an apple shortage or a banana surplus.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Feb 21 at 13:55
  • 13
    @MonkeyZeus what?, can you please explain your self. Feb 21 at 13:56
  • 30
    @FaraazKurawle Exactly. Only I can explain my code.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Feb 21 at 14:41
  • 1
    @Tamás indeed, but what if the code is not what the OP meant to write? I've seen it happen endlessly.
    – user17242583
    Feb 21 at 15:25
  • 1
    @Faraaz Understood. But what if they OP posted their answer and left it - to grab a cup of coffee or even go to bed - but it had mistakes in because the hadn't reviewed it carefully enough? Worse still, it actually works, but is not what the OP intended... It's not a likely scenario, but it's possible.
    – user17242583
    Feb 21 at 15:34
  • 2
    @richardec ,That's why the accepted answer suggest to wait for few days and then edit Feb 21 at 15:36
  • 4
    To stay with the banana example, any domain expert on bananas should be perfectly able to understand the code and explain it. So any monkey should be able to make an edit there. If only the original Fruit Salad maker can explain what he/she did there and didn't ... then the code is probably useless.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 22 at 9:25
  • 3
    @RyanfaeScotland All you are doing is pointlessly repeating the effect of the code on the program state, a la useless/redundant comments. You are not explaining it in terms of the abstract/application state. Such an explanation is not determined by the code & should be judged by votes after posting. (Your banana example is misleading: in the original banana comment we don't know the import of "I have a banana"; bananas being part of the real world, it might seem like you are giving an abstract/application explanation, but your analogy changes having a banana to be mere program state.)
    – philipxy
    Feb 22 at 9:44
  • 4
    @philipxy the comments aren't useless/redundant to the future readers who aren't domain experts and don't understand what the code does. Q: "How do I split a banana?" A: Knife.Slice(banana, 1, 6). If that was all the answer was can you tell me what Knife.Slice does? Presumably it splits a banana, but what do the parameters do? An edit to add that info is useful. Edit: "Knife.Slice takes the item you want to slice, how many of them and how many pieces you want each sliced into. In this example it would return an array of 6 BananaSlices. You can read more here: official docs" Feb 22 at 11:06
  • 4
    @philipxy I still don't understand where you are coming from. If you want to explain it further I'll consider it further but equally happy to leave it there and accept we disagree but have both put our thoughts forward. Feb 22 at 11:28

8 Answers 8

95

No, you should not insert explanations into code-only answers.

An edit is to clarify the poster's intent. If they didn't explain, you are communicating your explanation, not theirs. And changing the author's intent is an edit rejection reason. And you are rewarding the posting of a fundamentally poor post. Post your own answer, giving credit for their code. Downvote and/or comment for clarification on their post.

https://stackoverflow.com/help/review-suggested-edits:

Basic workflow

  • Reject if the edit is unnecessary, destructive, or counter to the original author’s intent.

https://stackoverflow.com/help/editing:

Common reasons for edits include:

  • To clarify the meaning of the post (without changing that meaning)

(However in typical Stack Overflow unclear documentation fashion, it isn't actually clear whether the preceding is actually a limitation on the general advice:

When should I edit posts?

Any time you see a post that needs improvement

)

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  • 26
    I agree with this especially for brand-new answers. But I can think of some possible exceptions, like if the answer is old and popular, there are a lot of other answers, the answerer is inactive, and/or the explanation is short and widely-accepted. Then it's best to put the explanation where more people will see it.
    – wjandrea
    Feb 20 at 23:24
  • 10
    What if a mega-high repper refuses to explain the most simple posts? What if they are habitually demonstrating that it is completely okay and can earn unicorn points with code-only answers (an answer accompanied by a meaningless quote in relation to the answer and requests for question clarification is still a code-only answer)? I've plead multiple times for the prolific contributor to role model better posting behaviors but they adamantly refuse. And they still get upvotes. stackoverflow.com/a/71134862/2943403 Downvotes do not deter high reppers. Feb 21 at 0:39
  • 15
    Downvoting a correct answer that has no explanation "does not work" as a means to improve content. Feb 21 at 1:04
  • 6
    In my experience, down-voting code only answers is fairly effective. Particularly so if the poster realizes they are getting down-voted because of the lack of explanation. But keep in mind that code can also be self-explanatory in many cases.
    – Lundin
    Feb 21 at 7:30
  • 8
    I think you're over-interpreting "intent". If they don't like the explanation you added, they can always roll it back if it turns out to be wrong, or if their intent was to post a worse / lazy answer. Adding explanation for how/why a given piece of code is a good answer is a good thing if you're confident you understand how it works and any relevant nuances. That's the relevant factor, although I agree with your suggested course of action of posting your own answer, except in cases of old highly-voted answers when there are many other answers, as @wjandrea said. Feb 21 at 9:09
  • 6
    I frankly don't care what their intent was, if they didn't care about their answer enough to post literally any explanation. Or I'm satisfied with assuming their intent was the ideas demonstrated in the code posted. If such an answer is old and highly voted, improving it seems like the best course to me. (Again, when I'm sure I understand the question and answer well enough to not accidentally make it worse.) Edits bump the question, so if I did mess something up, someone else should notice. Feb 21 at 9:12
  • 4
    @mickmackusa If everyone keeps upvoting that answer, it means people find it useful. If you find it lacking, you may post your own. If people find your answer more useful, it will eventually have a higher score. This is how the system is set up.
    – Passer By
    Feb 21 at 12:02
  • 5
    @mickmackusa If more answers makes the page worse, that's a problem with the UI, not with the system. But I don't think it gets worse. The highest score answer floats to the top, and people only look downwards if that isn't sufficient.
    – Passer By
    Feb 21 at 12:27
  • 8
    Upvotes lie. I have seen plenty of highly upvoted answers that are incorrect, inappropriate, and misleading. The less scrolling a researcher needs to do, the better. It is not too much to ask for contributors to explain their solutions EVERY TIME. Code-only answers are the most selfish way of contributing. Feb 21 at 12:28
  • 8
    I am so bored of trying convince people that explaining snippets is more beneficial than not explaining. I really can't be bothered trying to see eye to eye with lazy contributors who just post "try this" snippets and walk away. The behavior is so myopic. Feb 21 at 12:34
  • 11
    The solution: annoy code-only posters until they either change or go away. Either way, Stack Overflow wins. SO is substantially huge, it doesn't need more contributors or more contributions. It actually needs fewer and better contributions. There is far too much noise and redundancy here. Feb 21 at 12:39
  • 14
    This post goes against one of the basic tenets of the site: All contributions are licensed under Creative Commons, and this site is collaboratively edited, like Wikipedia. If you see something that needs improvement, click edit!
    – Braiam
    Feb 21 at 13:19
  • 6
    I don't mean this in a bad way, but to me this reads like "we can't evaluate things on a case by case basis, better to have an unfortunate, but easily enforceable rule than to trust editors". It's OK to edit out "thanks" because there's no judgement call (you could make a regex for that). It's not OK to fix anything of consequence, because that takes judgement calls, and expertise. Not unlike how likes promote clickbait content on Youtube, voting is optimizing for... something, but is it really on "your side"? Why put so much faith in votes? Are you sure you want to tune out experts?
    – jrh
    Feb 22 at 3:10
  • 6
    @philipxy is not that you can, you are explicitly encouraged to. SE doesn't have unclear or contradictory instructions. SE only writes what is in the help center. Follow that guidance alone and you will find it very consistent. They only say "respect the author" and "don't change meaning". They do not say "if there's something that needs clarification, do not edit it". In fact, they go the extreme opposite "Common reasons for edits include: [...] To clarify the meaning of the post". The only sources of inconsistency appear when you include meta discussions. Ignore them.
    – Braiam
    Feb 22 at 11:35
  • 8
    I wholeheartedly disagree with this. If the code is correct, you're not changing the author's intent, you're simply explaining how the code works. There's zero reason not to do this.
    – Clonkex
    Feb 22 at 21:10
26

Is this OK, or should I ask the answer author to edit and add explanation themselves?

You should preferably let the author do the editing and explaining, so ask for it first. But in case the author doesn't do it and you're quite sure you know what you're doing and you use comments only where comments are useful, then go ahead and do it.

I say this because the idea in philipxy's answer ("Post your own answer, giving credit for their code.") won't work in my opinion.

I could do that and add another answer saying something like "The code in that other answer is nice but poorly documented, here it is again with some documentation" but that would result in fragmentation and duplication of content as well as an increase of the number of very similar answers, which is not desirable. Yes, there is a risk that such edits would break something but that risk is outweighed by the disadvantage of having lots of similar pieces of content clogging the system if we wouldn't make the edits and post additional answers instead.

Therefore it's either the original author that is doing the documentation of the code, or you, or nobody. In case the original author is gone or not reacting, it's either you or nobody. Stack Overflow is a collaborative effort. That's why I prefer that somebody does it. Of course there is a risk that quality actually goes down, not up, so you have to be really careful.

15
  • 1
    SO answers are CC-BY-SA; you can copy (with attribution) the code into your answer to go with the explanation. I agree that editing an explanation into answer is a good thing, especially on questions with lots of existing answers already (where a new one won't get much attention), especially when the answer in need of explanation is the highest voted. But your suggested reason of distance between answer and explanation isn't a show-stopper at all; the actual problem is vote totals for a fresh answer and being buried. Feb 21 at 9:15
  • 3
    @PeterCordes For fun, let me just try to take the idea to the extreme :): We could regard answers as extremely lightweight and spawn lots of similar answers (once again with more explanation, ...) and then show people all these answers and they have to read them all and then cluster them and compare within a cluster. Then we could pick the top of each cluster, discard the rest and again spawn new similar ones. Kind of like evolutionary optimization algorithms do. Main problem might be the explosion of number of answers.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 21 at 12:48
  • 8
    ... yeah, I have to go with this answer. In the interest of reducing duplication and fragmentation, just fix the damned answer. The implication here is that the code is actually good after all, otherwise why are we fixing up junk?
    – Gimby
    Feb 21 at 17:20
  • 3
    @Gimby Yes, the scenario is that someone provides good but unpolished content. Adding documentation by a domain expert I would still regard as polishing. Some contributors know their trade but are too lazy to really make their contributions perfect.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 21 at 20:20
  • 5
    @Trilarion: Yes, an explosion of answers, and duplication / fragmentation, is the actual problem with the "post your own answer" suggestion. Copying the code into an answer with explanation is not great, only somewhat less bad; I'm not advocating it, just pointing out that the reasoning in your question seems like a straw-man argument because there's no need to create that problem. Your points in your first comment are the actual reasons that should be in your answer. TL:DR: I like your conclusion that edits are good, but other parts of this answer were lacking. Feb 21 at 20:32
  • @PeterCordes Thanks for the comments. I think you're right and tried to reformulate the central part. If that is not sufficient for you, you can submit an edit because I'm basically through with it and do not know how to better word it.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 22 at 9:20
  • 1
    Looks good to me now; upvoted as the best explanation for why philipxy's answer is not good, and the voting on this meta question baffles me. I expected some support for the "never touch other people's answers" position, but that much support for such an extreme position seems crazy to me. One bit reason SO doesn't suck is that others can tweak and maintain highly-voted answers on existing questions, especially if the OP isn't doing it. It's not much of a stretch to assume their intent doesn't include being wrong or unhelpful. Feb 22 at 10:10
  • 2
    "as well as an explosion of the number of very similar answers" This is an unsubstantiated exaggeration, the site is premised on individuals giving their own take on answering.
    – philipxy
    Feb 22 at 10:15
  • 2
    @philipxy Explosion was indeed too strong. Nobody knows what would happen, would we consequently open up new answers whenever we see something that needs improvement and might change the intent. Changed to "increase" which is a more neutral description of what would likely happen.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 22 at 10:37
  • 2
    @PeterCordes "One bit reason SO doesn't suck is that others can tweak and maintain highly-voted answers on existing questions..." Not sure many people see the editing feature as so important. If you asked around I guess that most people see voting on different answers as the key element. And that requires answers, not necessarily edits to them. It's interesting to see that Wikipedia is for example going the complete other way with only one version of each article. It's all about different ways to collaborate. There seem to be many different collaboration modes possibly that kind of work.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 22 at 10:41
  • 3
    @philipxy "This is an unsubstantiated exaggeration" it is not, it happened and still happens when something is popular.
    – Braiam
    Feb 22 at 11:38
  • @Braiam nice read. I like that, "answer cannibalisation". We should use that term more often.
    – Gimby
    Feb 23 at 10:29
  • Answer cannibalization could be prevent if we had a merge process for very similar answers. But we haven't.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 23 at 10:50
  • 1
    Stack Overflow is a collaborative effort - but not a collaborative reward.. There is nearly no recognition for those poor souls who toil to make the advice better, wiki style and they're much more educative heroes than the FGITW who sling a code-only answer in quick quick to bag the unicorn points..
    – Caius Jard
    Feb 23 at 13:34
  • @GaiusJard You're right and I also mentioned this on this page. But then, the reward is completely the satisfaction of a job well done, a shining answer for example. The reward is not the unicorn points (at least I hope it isn't).
    – Trilarion
    Feb 23 at 14:02
10

Absolutely you should help make Stack Overflow better.

In the words of some SO users:

It's not our responsibility to make StackOverflow better.

Stephen C, July 21, 2018

They are simply wrong. I take every opportunity to make Stack Overflow better.

  • I format.
  • I add references.
  • I improve.
  • I clarify.
  • I reformat.
  • I add comments.

Because I want Stack Overflow to be the best it can be.

  • I joined SO the day after launch: 2008-09-16 14:53:25.
  • fourteen years, and 230k reputation, later I still hold to that altruistic goal

Please continue to help improve Stack Overflow; especially as a check against the people who insist "it's not our responsibility to make StackOverflow better".

It's not our responsibility to make Stack Overflow better, it's our privilege!


Remember that Stack Overflow was created as a combination of Wikipedia and Reddit. People can post and edit answers, and other people can vote on those answers.

Saying you shouldn't step on someone else's answer-toes, is like saying you shouldn't edit a Wikipedia entry because someone else already typed one in.

No, you should make edits to improve the sum total of all human knowledge.

7
  • 3
    I think the conflict here is rather about some more subtle lines. There is basically one camp that says, please do not edit pieces of content substantially because we are afraid you'll break things or start edit wars, rather create your own piece, even if that results in lots of non-perfect pieces. And there is the other camp that says we all collaborate and work on content together creating a smaller number of pieces which are more polished, even if that means that we sometimes break things or start edit wars or do not get rep for our services. In short: it's all about the way we collaborate.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 22 at 9:09
  • 2
    There's probably something to be said here on whether one should give a man an edit or teach them to edit. There are lots of ways to make something better, and not all of them lead in the same direction. Feb 22 at 12:11
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    @Trilarion "or do not get rep for our services." -- I'd honestly pay rep to fix some of these posts. I'm tired of writing 1 paragraph explanations in emails and internal docs saying "don't do this because" to try and preempt people reading a wrong popular post on SO. I've got the "bad SO post" wall of shame for almost every tech / language I use.
    – jrh
    Feb 22 at 13:25
  • 1
    @MisterMiyagi actually it leads to the same place: a better content. We don't really care how you make better content, we want people to make better content whenever possible.
    – Braiam
    Feb 22 at 16:58
  • @MisterMiyagi What are you specific misgivings? Do you have any example where the end result was undesired irrelevant of the process followed? Because using "is:a" and ordering by score, the end result seems to be consistently in the utopia direction.
    – Braiam
    Feb 22 at 19:17
  • 1
    @MisterMiyagi no, because I do not want this site to continue to be a cesspool going with the current inertia. So I will continue to push towards what would make the site successful. Also, since you didn't show any example that would support your misgivings, know that there are plenty of examples I can show you where it's working just as intended. As before, search for answers and order them by score, and you will notice that many of them have several editors, some in the tens, where they chip away to make the best answer possible. And edits that don't are promptly reverted.
    – Braiam
    Feb 23 at 0:46
  • @Braiam search for answers, order them by score reversed. Then just keep on scrolling until you find the little utopia the current approach has the manpower to sustain. Feb 23 at 6:36
6

Yes, so long as the code is good and you fully understand it, there's no reason not to add an explanation. You're not changing the author's intent; you're simply explaining how the code works. You're improving the answer, which is a good thing.

Some people have suggested that it's better to add your own answer but give credit for the code. I disagree. All this does is add clutter and duplication. We're not here to win at the game of points; we're here to provide high quality answers to high quality questions collaboratively. If the code is already good, just add the explanation of how it works.

If the code is bad, don't bother. It's never worth polishing a turd.

3
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    "we're here to provide high quality answers to high quality questions collaboratively" The problem with that is that if many people disagree with this, they will start undoing these edits and we will not be able to collaborate in such a way. We have to come to a mutual agreement, otherwise we will work against each other. If we truly say that substantial edits cannot be made then there is not much way to collaborate on single pieces of content. This is a fundamental difference about how we can collaborate and it should be discussed more. For the record, I agree with your answer.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 23 at 11:41
  • 3
    @Trilarion Sometimes I get the impression that a lot of people would be happy if it were no longer possible to edit answers created by someone else. (The wiki-like openness to edits is an integral part of how the site is meant to work, so I agree with you and Clonex.)
    – duplode
    Feb 23 at 13:53
  • @PeterMortensen While I agree that the semicolons are technically correct and prevent the comma splices, it's not acceptable to a) make extremely minor grammatical edits like that, and b) break the wording of my answer. I can only assume the removal of "does is" was an accident, but regardless, it made for a really bad edit. Without that change, you wouldn't have even been allowed to post the edit due to editing too few characters. And FWIW, you're not teaching me anything. I'm a grammar nerd. I just don't feel the need to bother with perfect grammar in everything I do.
    – Clonkex
    Feb 24 at 21:14
4

There isn't a one size fits all approach. Consider whether your changes would really make the answer more clear, or actually be a new answer outright.

  • Would your addition offer a small improvement, for example point out a language-specific feature or how some common trick applies?
    An edit is suitable for that.

  • Would your addition offer a significant contribution, for example explaining the approach from the ground up or increasing the answer size considerably?
    A separate answer referencing the original is suitable for that.

  • Does your addition make the answer viable to begin with, for example because the question asked for an explanation instead of just code?
    The downvote button is suitable for that.

3

Explanations for code are welcome. Some people are too lazy to write explanations; others think their code is so clear it doesn't need any explanations; in both cases, explanations can only make the post better (maybe not by much, in second case).

Keep in mind that some people write code and decide to add explanations later; in that case, your edits will conflict, which will make a mess. When I decide to explain someone else's code, I make sure a few days have passed first. But I am not sure this is the best way to prevent conflicts.


As noted in comments, make absolutely sure your explanation is correct. You should only post correct things in general, but when editing someone else's post in particular, it's doubly important: you risk changing author's intent and lowering the quality of the answer. If unsure, post explanations as your own answer, attribute the code and let the community vote.

8
  • 51
    "explanations can only make the post better" - only if the explanations are right ;)
    – user17242583
    Feb 20 at 15:48
  • 31
    For those people who are too lazy to write explanations, it's often helpful to write a comment letting them know that code-only answers are discouraged on SO, and giving them a link to how to answer. Feb 20 at 16:15
  • 10
    Given that OP can only suggest edits, this could risk getting them rejected as Conflicts with Author’s Intent.
    – BSMP
    Feb 20 at 23:00
  • 4
    so "people who are too lazy" will be encouraged to continue being "too lazy" (even getting more reputation) Feb 21 at 7:02
  • 11
    Not sure why this got so many up-votes, since editing other people's posts to insert potentially subjective comments is simply against edit policies. Such edits will get rejected since they might change the intent of the post, making it seem like the poster said things they never said.
    – Lundin
    Feb 21 at 7:27
  • 5
    @Lundin because it's one of the basic tenets of the site: All contributions are licensed under Creative Commons, and this site is collaboratively edited, like Wikipedia. If you see something that needs improvement, click edit! Adding explanations is an improvement, whatever your misgivings are.
    – Braiam
    Feb 21 at 13:19
  • @Lundin For an example of changing intents of posts see Git question with very nonlinear history: Answers cannibalizing each other into redundancy. The Git question referenced therein had 10 answers and over the years all these answers became more and more similar by edits from different people, certainly changing the intent of the original content creators. Should the intent-changing edits to the answers by non-original creators maybe be undone?
    – Trilarion
    Feb 21 at 15:53
  • 1
    @Trilarion all those answers should simply be deleted.
    – Braiam
    Feb 21 at 16:59
3
Provide your own answer with explanation*

Do not edit the answer...but if the user does not respond to a request to update with info, or in the case the user hasn't logged on in years and the reply is now abandoned...I suggest that you reference their post, but also provide a similar answer.

That way you have ownership of a full explanation to the answer. Only do it if it is a direct answer to the OP's question.


Provide a Similar Answer Matrix, if:
  • Has the posted answer been fully abandoned and there are no others which satisfy a proper explanation.
  • It is the actual answer needed to satisfy the OP's question.
  • *Do reference the other answer.
  • Provide a full code example based on the other answer.

This response is a clarification to @philipxy marked answer; expanding on

...Post your own answer, giving credit for their code.

1
  • 6
    Just to be clear, if you actually do this, copy the code (with attribution / reference), don't just reference the other post. You definitely want the code+explanation in one answer, such that if / when this better answer eventually gets voted to the top instead of lost in the clutter, it fully answers the question. (In many cases I think it's better to edit the original answer, especially if abandoned, or if you get an OK to do so in comments. Like when an explanation would be small and directly explain some cryptic code. But there are times when copy-with-attribution makes sense.) Feb 21 at 20:42
0

"Is it okay?" Sure, as long as you don't change the author's intent which is going to be hard not to do when you are adding so much context and language. It's certainly not the best option.

Instead, write your own answer. Explain the answer and take credit yourself. If you used the link-only answer to help with your answer, link to it and give credit where it is due, but no reason they should get the reputation for your explanation.

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