3

In the past, dates from previous years were shown like Month Day '<last 2 digits of year>, such as December 31 '21.

However, now the four digit date number has been spelled out, like December 31 2021. Personally, I liked the old one better.

Why is this happening?

3
  • Even ECMAScript had the notion that two-digit year representation does not make much sense, and got a getFullYear instance method. The fact that SE finally followed through with this is a welcome change - why would anyone consider two-digit years in any way superior to a full, unambiguous representation? Feb 11 at 14:07
  • @OlegValter I made a decent living off of Y2K, and I don't want to have to wait for Y10K to get on that gravy train again. Feb 11 at 20:03
  • If you really like the old way better, it should be easy to write a userscript to do that (I wouldn't be surprised if someone already has). Feb 12 at 0:18

1 Answer 1

15

All dates will be rendered using the full four-digit year instead of the abbreviated two-digit year with apostrophe notation.

The rationale is covered in the announcement on Meta Stack Exchange Years in dates will now display with all four digits by Yaakov Ellis

Specifically:

we have found out through user research that this two-digit date format can be confusing to some users, especially to those who have learned English as a second language.

So the date Jul 15 '09 will now be presented as Jul 15 2009. This is done:

with the hope of making dates clearer to all users, without sacrificing significant space in the process (trading one apostrophe for two digits).

Any feedback, questions, and/or concerns should be addressed to the announcement on Meta Stack Exchange.

Nothing else has changed as part of this, including showing all dates in UTC, the format of date tooltips, or the way that we abbreviate months. Also, the date format has not been changed at all on the international sites.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .