-113

tl;dr

We'll be using stackoverflow.co as our main domain name for marketing activities - all products on stackoverflow.com will stay the same. We'll start transitioning today with /company, and the product marketing pages and other supporting services over the coming weeks.


We're doing some housekeeping with our domain names (we're obsessed). Starting today (Feb 10th 2022) you will see stackoverflow.co being used to replace the following:

Company pages

stackoverflow.com/company

Where you can learn more about the company behind Stack Overflow & Stack Exchange Network, including our internal job listings and press pages.

Product marketing pages

stackoverflow.com/teams, /collectives-on-stack-overflow, etc.

Where you can learn about Stack Overflow for Teams and our other business products. The products themselves will remain where they are in stackoverflow.com.

Resources, campaigns & promotional email

stackoverflowsolutions.com, info.stackoverflowsolutions.com

Where customers and potential customers can learn in-depth about some of our product fundamentals and features.

Although in terms of business structure this makes sense, behind the scenes the first two sets of pages are actually built from the same questions and answers application monolith that you're reading now.

We're breaking up with the monolith

Long time readers will note we've shuffled these around a few times. In late 2019 we moved Talent and Advertising over to stackoverflow.com from stackoverflowbusiness.com - the main factors at the time being:

  • Brand consistency & authority, keeping everyone in one domain.
  • We wanted to avoid confusion with the Business plan of Teams.
  • SEO benefits from stackoverflow.com being a high ranked domain.
  • Desire to move away from legacy marketing tools.
  • Tech limitations making it much quicker to create static sites in our current stack.
  • Lack of resources for anything too complex (e.g., custom content management system, etc.) in the time allowed.

A lot has changed since then and now it felt time to reevaluate how this very stable, but very manual process worked.

We also looked at what others were doing (e.g., our friends at Reddit have redditinc.com for a similar purpose) and decided from a brand perspective it is an acceptable trade-off to move these pages somewhere else. In addition, there were a few more practical factors:

  • Marketing pages don't make sense in the same codebase as the main site anymore. We're taking up engineering cycles that could be better spent improving the product.
  • Faster pace of work than historically needed—content & design tweaks happen almost daily as we optimize and launch new features.
  • Future desire for a content management system (CMS) to allow internal teams to update the site in near real-time (e.g., adding press releases). We didn't want to build this into the monolith, and again it doesn't make sense to have engineers update text on webpages.
  • Security: user data, site integrity and stability could be affected by non-critical pages and services. There's also no need to know who's logged-in on these pages.

A full list of pages that are moving to the new domain

  • stackoverflow.com/company

    • stackoverflow.com/company/careers
    • stackoverflow.com/company/contact
    • stackoverflow.com/company/leadership/*
    • stackoverflow.com/company/press/*
    • stackoverflow.com/company/research
    • stackoverflow.com/company/work-here/*
  • stackoverflow.com/teams

    • stackoverflow.com/teams/calculate/*
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/customers
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/customer-success
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/features/*
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/integrations
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/pricing
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/security
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/tour
    • stackoverflow.com/teams/use-cases/*
  • stackoverflow.com/advertising

    • stackoverflow.com/advertising/audience
    • stackoverflow.com/advertising/contact
    • stackoverflow.com/advertising/guidelines
    • stackoverflow.com/advertising/policies
    • stackoverflow.com/advertising/solutions
  • stackoverflow.com/collectives-on-stack-overflow

    • stackoverflow.com/collectives-on-stack-overflow/contact
    • stackoverflow.com/collectives-on-stack-overflow/tour
  • stackoverflow.com/talent

    • stackoverflow.com/talent/branding
    • stackoverflow.com/talent/contact
    • stackoverflow.com/talent/solutions

* tertiary pages omitted

Everything should work smoothly with redirects in place, but as always we appreciate any bug reports as an answer to this post (one bug per answer please).

28
  • 98
    Maybe you should also mention the support.stackenterprise.co domain you use for user tickets. I raised one a while back and got an email telling me to click on https://support.stackenterprise.co/register/$randomAlphanumericString which looks exactly like the hundreds of phishing mails I get (familiar yet different domain; weird alphanumeric link etc.). I had to ask an employee to confirm that this was in fact from you before I would click on it. Even better of course would be to use the official domain for these things so we don't need to be guessing.
    – terdon
    Feb 10 at 18:30
  • 14
    Any chance the "team" page can be returned that used to list the folks who work at Stack Overflow? I always enjoyed browsing that page to see new hires or remind myself what someone's title was or who was in such-and-such position...
    – TylerH
    Feb 10 at 19:14
  • 3
    The setup looks sloppy and forced, hopefully the workflow gets improved.
    – Travis J
    Feb 10 at 20:47
  • 58
    Why do you need a separate domain to get all the benefits you listed? Feb 10 at 21:55
  • 59
    Might result in people mistaking the company as Colombian. (.co is the country TLD for Colombia)
    – gparyani
    Feb 10 at 23:17
  • 22
    @ShambhavGautam some international sites do that to separate the various localities but that's not what gparyani is talking about. Each country has a version of '.com' of their own... and .co is the one for Colombia (full list here).
    – Catija StaffMod
    Feb 11 at 4:20
  • 92
    A different domain name under .com would probably have looked less fishy.
    – einpoklum
    Feb 11 at 9:37
  • 8
    @ShambhavGautam Yes, countries can make a lot of money selling domains in their assigned TLDs to people in other countries. The most famous example is ".tv", which belongs to the tiny island of Tuvalu, and is one of its largest exports by value. I thought the value would have dropped with ICANN opening things up for private global domains like ".horse", but clearly Colombia is still managing to market ".co" to the likes of Stack Overflow, Inc.
    – IMSoP
    Feb 11 at 10:38
  • 54
    Stack Overflow devs delivering yet another feature that no one asked for, while neglecting the fact that the actual experience of using the core product has been steadily getting worse for at least 5 years. Why not spend some of your time on QoL improvements to the core product so there's actually a company left in a couple of years to pedal the enterprise version? It's genuinely depressing to see how misallocated the development effort is.
    – Michael
    Feb 11 at 12:40
  • 16
    My first instinct when seeing .co, is that it's specific to a country.
    – Kevin B
    Feb 11 at 21:19
  • 11
    @IMSoP .io and .ai are also good examples of popular exported country code TLDs. As they say, the sun never sets on the British name servers. As far as the popularity of country TLDs after the introduction of private global domains, I think the length is what gives them value (stackoverflow.co looks better than stackoverflow.company). And I think most non-webtech people don't realize popular two-letter TLDs belong to a country anyway, and often get confused by longer TLDs. Feb 12 at 1:21
  • 10
    Sing it @Michael! For instance, they could fix basic issues with the on-site snippets people try to use every day. But no. The rearrange these deck chairs rather than do even quick and easy things. Feb 13 at 14:34
  • 18
    Arriving late to the party, I was about to post a rant about "hey common sense tells that using .co and .com for different sites isn't a brilliant idea and it makes one of them look like a shady phising site". Then I realized that some hundred of other people have already made that argument independently of me. I think those hundreds of people might be right.
    – Lundin
    Feb 15 at 14:03
  • 9
    *Expands vote tally.* +44 / -44 "Perfectly balanced, as all things should be."
    – Greg
    Feb 15 at 14:54
  • 32
    But what about this: i.stack.imgur.com/5OkXF.png Feb 16 at 6:59

11 Answers 11

270

Personally, without being told that stackoverflow.co is the new official site, I would have suspected anything directing me to stackoverflow.co to be a phishing attempt. In general .com feels more trustable. I think this change is doing yourselves a disservice, and that you could probably achieve the key aims some other way (or with a different .com domain - though even that might feel scammy).

9
  • 95
    This also actively harms the efforts of training people to recognize phishing. I'm sure even among the more-tech-savvy-than-usual userbase of SO, there are more than enough who are not good at recognizing malicious emails. And usually "typo domain === phishing" is a pretty good indicator for something malicious... Feb 10 at 23:44
  • 23
    As @ThiefMaster said: typo domain == phishing (or at best someone trying to reap some easy traffic). Let me add: == disregard without further thought.
    – Pablo H
    Feb 11 at 0:12
  • 34
    Out of curiosity, I just checked to see if stackoverflow.cc was available. Nope. Registered and redirects you to several different ad sites, and at least one phishing type site. 🤮 Feb 11 at 14:48
  • 1
    While I upvote this, bigger threat seems to be that links in emails are usually looks like legitcompany.myclick.me/[someid] nowadays. Is is legit - I don't know until I click. Does it look phishy - yes. Does anyone care - I doubt.
    – Kos
    Feb 14 at 15:28
  • 6
    @Kos maybe I'm old-school, but if I get a link like that I will not click it. If I care enough I'll go to the companies home page and try to find the content from there. Or I'll curl it and look for redirects etc. Feb 15 at 4:37
  • 6
    @Kos I regularly report Paypal's e-mails to their own "report phishing" address. Yes, we absolutely can and should blame anyone who follows these bad practices.
    – IMSoP
    Feb 15 at 10:45
  • 13
    .co should be for the Colombian site. That is what .co means. Anything else just looks like phishing or domain squattting.
    – rjmunro
    Feb 15 at 14:16
  • 18
    .co looks "hacky" and unprofessional and feels like a facepalm for what's supposed to be a site for tech best practices
    – tenfour
    Feb 15 at 15:33
  • 6
    Also looking forward to justification discussions for similar moves by others; "But hey, Stack Overflow is doing it so it must be a good move, right?". Wouldn't subdomains be a more prudent move? company.stackoverflow.com, teams.stackoverflow.com, etc. or even just business.stackoverflow.com/whatever. I'm sorry, but I gotta agree with those that say that you're doing yourself a disservice with this. Do not be surprised if emails from and emails mentioning this new domain is flagged as spam. Feb 17 at 14:21
244

Makes sense to give the marketing team their own separate space to work in, but stackoverflow.co sounds phishy. Why not business.stackoverflow.com or some other subdomain? I wouldn't trust anything from stackoverflow.co unless I got referred there from an official source.

10
  • 141
    +1000 - this is a textbook example of what subdomains are for!
    – deep64blue
    Feb 11 at 21:15
  • 58
    This is not just subjective. It's how the Web fundamentally works. You can get a HTTPS certificate for *.stackoverflow.com but not for stackoverflow.co*. Message back to the StackExchange marketeers: you're signaling to engineers that you, an Internet company, don't know how the Internet works. That's like Ford or Toyota admitting they don't know how engines work.
    – MSalters
    Feb 14 at 9:56
  • 10
    We explored this (along with proxying the subfolders) but it's a related concern described here with sharing our login cookies around meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/338332/…
    – David Longworth Staff
    Feb 14 at 13:39
  • 9
    I see. It's too bad Stack Overflow doesn't have the cookies on www.stackoverflow.com with a www in front to avoid problems with sharing cookies. Let me say that I appreciate you guys posting decisions you plan on making before they are implemented and actively reviewing feedback from the community. Feb 14 at 16:27
  • 15
    This may be a nonstarter as the Stack Overflow company may not own it, but even something like stackoverflow.biz would be less suspicious. It certainly feels more semantically correct, if nothing else.
    – M. Justin
    Feb 14 at 17:50
  • 4
    Seems to me like you would be going in the wrong direction with the domain because of a problem created by a third party cookie issue. I would solve the cookie issue in a different way, and keep all your content under the primary domain.
    – JeremyM4n
    Feb 15 at 18:18
  • 6
    @M.Justin disagree I view .biz as a dumpsterfire TLD only marginally less radioactive than .info. (I have seen 1 or 2 legitimate .biz sites, I've never seen anything that wasn't garbage/malicious using .info.) Feb 15 at 21:39
  • 3
    @hostingutilities.com "We'll start transitioning today with /company" is hardly "posting decisions [...] before they are implemented" though. Feb 16 at 12:17
  • 5
    I agree with @M.Justin that using a completely different TLD that avoids the appearance of typo-squatting would be far less suspicious.
    – jamesdlin
    Feb 16 at 21:59
  • @JeremyM4n how would you propose to do it?
    – Braiam
    Feb 20 at 10:09
166

Now that you're moving the business-related content to a new domain, can you please revert the homepage for anonymous users to how it used to be before 2019? I mean people have complained over and over and over and over about this and how the original content is hidden behind all these "ads".

I can only picture this scenario with the new domain:

  1. Typing "www.stackoverflow.co" in the browser's address bar

  2. Oh, no. Looks like I opened the wrong domain. This is for business; let me get out of here. I should probably click this link:

    The homepage of "stackoverflow.co" with a link that says "Go to stackoverflow.com"

  3. Seriously, business again? Where are the questions?

    The infamous homepage of "stackoverflow.com"

If you're not going to get rid of the stackoverflow.com homepage, can you at least have the "Go to stackoverflow.com" link redirect to /questions instead?

7
  • 46
    Not sure whether the questions page is the best page to open for new users (I would prefer dropping them to some search interface), but definitely agree that anything is better than the current homepage. Feb 11 at 6:41
  • 7
    I didn't know StackOverflow had a homepage. Thanks for that. BTW I agree with you. Feb 11 at 9:58
  • 1
    @DavidMulder did someone fix the search so that we truly can confront new users with it?
    – Holger
    Feb 11 at 13:40
  • 7
    @Holger 7 and a half years ago I was proposing to replace the homepage with a search box... despite search being even worse back then: Give greater dominance/placement to searching rather than asking for new/low rep users My reasoning is simply that searching for a post they saw or asking a new question is the most likely reason a new user might end up on stackoverflow. The latter should only happen after they search, so putting search front and center still sounds like a good idea to me. Feb 11 at 13:49
  • 18
    Let me look at my crystal ball to determine the official response by SO. Oh, here it is: "Thank you for your feedback. After careful deliberation, we choose to blah blah blah TL;DR: lol, no, the homepage will stay." - I fully agree with your request but would be very surprised for any other sort of reaction.
    – l4mpi
    Feb 11 at 14:36
  • Surprisingly, "Our Public Platform" from the .co homepage is already linked to /questions directly.
    – Andrew T.
    Feb 12 at 5:21
  • 2
    @DavidMulder there's /questions/ask/advice which has a search box and is focused on users who want to ask a question.
    – Andrew T.
    Feb 12 at 5:26
63

Why pick such similar URLs? If you want to separate them, separate them properly.

2
  • 42
    overflowsta.ck ... Feb 13 at 16:19
  • 4
    SO achievements of 2022: we removed the m
    – totymedli
    Feb 20 at 15:39
57

Colombia is a beautiful country, so I don't want this post taken the wrong way. But unless you've got a pending announcement that you are moving your headquarters along with most of your business operations to Bogotá, I highly recommend that you stick with a domain that is consistent with the country in/from which you conduct business. That traditionally is .com for businesses based in the United States.

As is well stated in the comments, after the corporate training I and many others have had, if I see a very well known site such as Stack Overflow being linked to a Colombian website (.co is the country code top-level domain for Colombia FYI, if that hadn't come up in your discussions on this decision), then my first response is immediately going to be along the lines of, "Hold on. This might be a trap!"

I wouldn't be surprised if all of my personal email servers and my business email servers have that same philosophy scripted in as well, possibly automatically piping every single one of these messages into the Spam folder.

6
  • 18
    I am in no way an expert on things like this, but my understanding is that .co is used far beyond just for the country of Colombia. As far as I'm aware, even the Wikipedia list recognizes this. "Marketed as a global domain. Anyone can register."
    – Catija StaffMod
    Feb 12 at 15:09
  • 3
    @Catija, absolutely that's true. I'm just addressing the typical expectations and issues that might arise from using a domain not associated with such a well established web site. I don't think most people are going to be expecting any StackOverflow site to come from a Columbian domain, and indeed that's likely to fire up a few flags.
    – ouflak
    Feb 12 at 15:23
  • 4
    That is a good point. I had only heard of the small Pacific nation Tonga (.to) trying to make a business of its TLD. (Incidently, it is where the 2022 eruption took place.) Feb 12 at 16:27
  • 12
    See also: Austria (.at), Tuvalu (.tv), Libya (.ly), British Indian Ocean Territory (.io) etc. Feb 12 at 16:46
  • 17
    Hi, Colombian Here. We dont use .co in the same way than this. We use com.co instead. Actually Colombia have a contract with some american company to manage .co domain in order to sell to companies around the world. Colombian government makes like 500 millions dollars for that. Feb 14 at 3:18
  • 1
    Another case is .nu which supposedly belonged to the island state of Niue, though "nu" happens to mean "now" in several languages including Swedish - the domain is currently controlled by The Swedish Internet Foundation but not without controversy, there's been a lawsuit. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.nu
    – Lundin
    Feb 16 at 14:56
46

The tour link (which is a tour for https://stackoverflow.com/, not Teams or Collectives) seems out of place on this new domain:

enter image description here

If it says "New here? Take a tour", I expect the tour to be about the website that I'm on.

26

In addition to the appearance of being a typosquatter (as many others have pointed out), now if someone makes a typo and accidentally visits stackoverflow.co, they will be taken to a similar but different site and will be completely confused if they do not realize their mistake. And then stackoverflow.co would be an incorrect result in their browser history and potentially would become an autocomplete target when they want stackoverflow.com.

That's terrible usability.

23

As a Colombian, I can say that the .co domain is not associated with Colombian domains.

In fact, the Colombian government gets 81% for every .co domain due to a contract with foreign companies.

The domain has historically been used by companies around the world, especially in the UK.

Because of that, right here in Colombia, we use .com.co to identify Colombian-specific domains instead. We have never associated our internal domains with the .co domain.

As Colombians, we are okay with that. I mean, it is a good business for us.

8
  • "As Colombians, we are okay with that. I mean, it is a good business for us." Sure, no objection there. I guess the main point of for example the answer by Michael Anderson is that this practice of using .co domains is not that well known around the world. Some people might adjust to it, others might stay away. In the end, it's the call of the company how they want to be known.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 14 at 11:08
  • 13
    Quoting Kaspersky: "Typosquatters are especially fond of the Colombian top-level domain, .co, due to its similarity with the most widely used TLD, .com." Similar concerns from other posters here. That makes me curious: how does the Colombian government deal with these concerns? Do they screen potential buyers (for example by verifying buyer owns the .com domain), or is it just first come, first served? Feb 14 at 14:20
  • 7
    Any citation for "especially in the UK"? You may be muddling it with the suffix ".co.uk" which was, until a recent dubious marketing decision, the most common suffix for a UK address, and has nothing to do with Colombia.
    – IMSoP
    Feb 14 at 15:29
  • 1
    @RuudHelderman Colombian government agencies has never had direct administration on .co domain. Because of the contract foreign companies makes everything about administration and just to colombia. Feb 14 at 18:19
  • @IMSoP sorry, I dont have citation right now but I remember that because of that (.co.uk) several companies into uk see .co domain as a abbreviation so maybe this is why. Feb 14 at 18:21
  • 2
    @Trilarion sure, frankly I really believe that Stackoverflow have to make the best decisions not matter what. And I know that, for some people, the country association will be problematic especially because the production of certain products very popular in societies of developed countries. Personally Im fine with .com but Ive only what to make clear that .co its not commonly used for us (colombians). Feb 14 at 18:25
  • @JuanFernandoz Fair enough; not a trend I've ever noticed as a UK native. If anything, I would have guessed it would see less take-up here, since people might assume that "acme.co" is a typo for "acme.co.uk". Mostly, I just see it used for making extra-short domains, like Twitter tracking everybody's links by redirecting them through "t.co".
    – IMSoP
    Feb 14 at 18:28
  • 1
    The TLD for ".com.co" is still ".co". Prefixing it with a ".com" doesn't change the TLD, which remains ".co".
    – Bobort
    Feb 17 at 14:49
22

We'll be using stackoverflow.co as our main domain name for marketing activities

I respect your choice.

But what a shame to miss out on:

stackoverflow.biz

3
  • 13
    Why not "stackoverflow.company"? Or "stackoverflow.international"? Or how about "stackoverflow.kosher", to highlight that this is the real address, and definitely not a domain squatter that's going to redirect you to malware and phishing sites?
    – IMSoP
    Feb 15 at 10:49
  • 15
    I would definitely have at least considered stackover.florist which is currently available for only $8.95USD. A steal! Feb 16 at 7:07
  • 3
    bizoverflow.com would have been pretty neat too :) "Yeah we got so much bizniz it won't even fit on the stack, you know. We have to store it using external addressing."
    – Lundin
    Feb 18 at 8:29
12

Obviously, it's ultimately up to the company (since it's the company page), but I don't understand what the point of the change is TBH. That being said, what's wrong with just leaving it "as is"?

6

While we're here, the "Business" link goes to https://stackoverflow.com/?products instead of the new business site.

screenshot of help menu

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .